Items tagged with ryzen 9 5950x

November 5 will here in a jiffy, and so will a bevy of post-embargo benchmark scores and reviews. While we sit back and wait, the folks at SiSoftware have put together a Ryzen 9 5950X 'review' of sorts, based on scores uploaded to its SANDRA benchmarking database, and like everything else we have seen up to this point, it crushes the competition. Not that anyone should be surprised. The Ryzen 9 5950X is a 16-core/32-thread hunk of heavy metal with a 3.4GHz base clock and 4.9GHz max boost clock. It also has 64MB of L3 cache and 8MB of L2 cache, and a 105W TDP. And of course it is based on AMD's latest Zen 3 architecture, which the company claims delivers a 19 percent IPC improvement over Zen 2.... Read more...
Zen 3 is a force to be reckoned with, assuming the various benchmark leaks are even remotely accurate. Not that we are surprised—Zen 2 is one heck of a CPU architecture, so it stands to reason that Zen 3 will be as well. How much better is the question, and some newly leaked scores for a Ryzen 9 5950X may help answer it. This is another validated CPU-Z benchmark run, like the one from earlier this week that highlighted the performance of the Ryzen 7 5800X. To recap, it put the smack down on both Intel's Comet Lake CPUs, and AMD's own Ryzen 3000 series. Or to be more specific, it's single-threaded score came in 11 percent higher than an Intel Core i7-10900K, and 24 percent higher than the... Read more...
If you are not already dreaming and drooling about the prospect of building a high-end PC around AMD's flagship Ryzen 9 5950X processor, some newly leaked benchmarks might just do it. Over on Geekbench (where else?), there exists a handful of benchmark runs showing the mighty processor nudging a little past 5GHz. The Ryzen 9 5950X is a decked out slice of silicon constructed with 16 physical CPU cores and 32 threads of computing muscle. It has a 3.4GHz base clock and up to a 4.9GHz boost clock, plus 64MB of L3 cache, 8MB of L2 cache, PCIe 4.0 support, and all of the performance benefits of AMD's fancy Zen 3 CPU architecture. AMD's rated max boost clock does not factor in its Precision Boost Overdrive... Read more...
November will be here before we know it, and with it comes the retail availability of AMD's latest generation Ryzen 5000 series, based on Zen 3. Then we will have a clear picture of whether the new chips truly deliver upon AMD's claimed 19 percent IPC (instructions per clock) uplift over Zen 2. As we wait, more slightly-early benchmarks have emerged, at a familiar place—the Geekbench database. We have high hopes for Zen 3, based on what AMD is claiming, combined with the spattering of leaked benchmarks that have emerged since the Ryzen 5000 series was officially announced. We always have to take such things with a big pinch of salt, though generally, the closer to retail availability we... Read more...
You have questions, I have questions, we all have questions about AMD's recently announced Ryzen 5000 series, and specifically regarding how actual performance stacks up with the company's claim of a 19 percent IPC (instructions per clock) uplift over the Ryzen 3000 series. Reliable answers will have to wait until the reviews are posted. Waiting is hard, though, and while caution should be taken when looking at unofficial benchmark runs, there is another set of interesting results to digest, this time within SiSoftware's SANDRA database. This latest round of leaked data follows the recent discovery of Zen 3 benchmark results within the Cinebench R20 database, which we wrote about earlier this... Read more...
One of the last places you would expect to see a Ryzen 5000 series desktop processor is inside a Mac system. Apple is even shifting away from x86 processors altogether, having announced plans to phase out its use of Intel CPUs in favor of its own custom processors based on ARM. So what is this business about a an alleged Mac system running a Ryzen 9 5950X CPU appearing in Geekbench all about? That is a wonderful question, and rather than drag out the suspense, we will go ahead and say we do not know for sure. We have some ideas, though, one of which is a nifty Hackintosh setup. It could also be a clever fake with some fancy editing by whoever is behind this, but where is the fun in that? This... Read more...
Yowza! AMD made some bold claims during the unveiling of its Ryzen 5000 series, which will land on retail shelves next month. According to AMD, its upcoming Zen 3 chips are "the fastest gaming CPUs in the world," a boast that belonged to Intel up to this point. But is Zen 3 all that and a bag of sea salt and vinegar kettle cooked potato chips? Well, some early benchmark results on Cinebench R20 are certainly tasty. We'll get to the benchmark numbers in a moment, but first let's recap the Ryzen 5000 series lineup. AMD is kicking off the Zen 3 party with four chips: Ryzen 9 5950X ($799), Ryzen 9 5900X ($549), Ryzen 7 5800X ($449), and Ryzen 5 5600X ($299, with a Wraith Stealth air cooler included).... Read more...
The highly anticipated follow-up to AMD's blockbuster Zen 2 family of Ryzen 3000 desktop processors is finally here. AMD has announced its Ryzen 5000 desktop processor family, which is based on its all-new Zen 3 architecture. Zen 3 is still being produced on the 7nm process node, but AMD has managed to deliver a number of key improvements to provide a significant boost in performance over its predecessor. AMD Is Skipping Ryzen 4000 And Going Straight To Ryzen 5000 For Desktops But before we get into the details, we first need to talk about model naming; specifically, Ryzen 5000. Conventional wisdom would dictate that the next generation of AMD’s consumer desktop processors would be called... Read more...