Items tagged with ryzen 9 5950x

What will Intel's upcoming Alder Lake CPUs bring to the performance spectrum? Perhaps a retaking of the crown against AMD's finest. That is getting waaaay ahead of things, but if you are pulling for Alder Lake to hoist Intel back on top, then you will be interested in the latest supposedly leaked benchmark run featuring a Core i9-12900K processor. The Core i9-12900K has been making the rounds lately, because apparently qualification samples are in the wild (and being sold for insane prices). For anyone who is unfamiliar with the terminology, QS chips are essentially later revision engineering samples sent out to OEMs and sometimes reviewers, in anticipation of a pending launch. They are typically... Read more...
Intel's 11th generation Rocket Lake-S processors are on deck to launch during Q1 2021, and excitement is building. Leading up to the official launch, Intel has been dropping hints about the new processor family's performance compared to AMD's lineup of Ryzen processors. Today, Intel gives us a very early preview of how the storage subsystem will fair against systems using AMD's Zen 3-based Ryzen 5000 processors. In this case, Intel is touting its alleged superior PCIe 4.0 performance with its upcoming flagship Core i9-11900K against AMD's flagship Ryzen 9 5950X. Intel paired its processor with an ASUS Z590 ROG Maximus XIII Hero motherboard, while the AMD processor was coupled with an ASUS X570... Read more...
There was little question, when we took a deep dive look at AMD's Ryzen 9 5950X and Ryzen 9 5900X in our launch day review, we came away thoroughly impressed. Not only did AMD deliver on its promise of a significant performance lift in many areas, versus its previous gen Ryzen 3000 series, but we also realized better power consumption characteristics for even better performance-per-watt results than we expected. But let's take a step back. You might recall that a little over a year ago, we trucked on down to scenic Kenilworth New Jersey to meet with our buds at Maingear for a very special all-AMD DIY PC build in Maingear's new Vybe chassis with its oh-so swank Apex Liquid cooling system. Maingear... Read more...
AMD's Ryzen 5000 family of Zen 3 processors launched last week, and as most were expecting, the reviews were overwhelmingly positive. While AMD didn't take the performance crown in every single benchmark, its lead in the majority of them was significant enough that Intel was seeing taillights the majority of the time.  Needless to say, enthusiasts were eager to get their hands on the processors, only to be thwarted by "out of stock" messages from retailers and inventory that was depleted in mere minutes. Back in late September, Frank Azor, AMD Chief Architect of Gaming Solutions and Marketing, responded to a tweet that claimed AMD would fall victim to the same shortages that NVIDIA... Read more...
At long last, the Ryzen 5000 series has arrived, and as expected, it "sets a new performance bar," as Marco notes in his review of the Ryzen 9 5950X and Ryzen 9 5900X. Check it out for all of the delightful details, complete with a bevy of actual (read: not leaked!) benchmark results. As for overclocking, we saw some modest results, but someone was able to crank the Ryzen 9 5950X all the way to 6GHz across all 16 cores. That is nothing short of spectacular. To recap the specs, the Ryzen 9 5950X is AMD's new flagship consumer desktop processor, with 16 cores and 32 threads. Out of the box, it has a 3.4GHz base clock and 4.9GHz max boost clock, along with 8MB of L2 cache and 64MB of L3 cache, and... Read more...
AMD made some bold claims when it unveiled the Zen 3-based Ryzen 5000 series during its event early last month. Terms like “historic IPC uplift”, “fastest for gamers”, and “leading power efficiency” -- among a few other superlatives -- were bandied about with impunity. Over the course of the announcement, however, as AMD disclosed actual performance data and ran a few live demos, it became clear the company wasn’t kidding. If all of AMD’s claims proved true, the Ryzen 5000 series would be poised to lead the industry in content creation and gaming workloads, single- and multi-core performance, process technology, and power efficiency. They say, “You... Read more...
November 5 will here in a jiffy, and so will a bevy of post-embargo benchmark scores and reviews. While we sit back and wait, the folks at SiSoftware have put together a Ryzen 9 5950X 'review' of sorts, based on scores uploaded to its SANDRA benchmarking database, and like everything else we have seen up to this point, it crushes the competition. Not that anyone should be surprised. The Ryzen 9 5950X is a 16-core/32-thread hunk of heavy metal with a 3.4GHz base clock and 4.9GHz max boost clock. It also has 64MB of L3 cache and 8MB of L2 cache, and a 105W TDP. And of course it is based on AMD's latest Zen 3 architecture, which the company claims delivers a 19 percent IPC improvement over Zen 2.... Read more...
Zen 3 is a force to be reckoned with, assuming the various benchmark leaks are even remotely accurate. Not that we are surprised—Zen 2 is one heck of a CPU architecture, so it stands to reason that Zen 3 will be as well. How much better is the question, and some newly leaked scores for a Ryzen 9 5950X may help answer it. This is another validated CPU-Z benchmark run, like the one from earlier this week that highlighted the performance of the Ryzen 7 5800X. To recap, it put the smack down on both Intel's Comet Lake CPUs, and AMD's own Ryzen 3000 series. Or to be more specific, it's single-threaded score came in 11 percent higher than an Intel Core i7-10900K, and 24 percent higher than the... Read more...
If you are not already dreaming and drooling about the prospect of building a high-end PC around AMD's flagship Ryzen 9 5950X processor, some newly leaked benchmarks might just do it. Over on Geekbench (where else?), there exists a handful of benchmark runs showing the mighty processor nudging a little past 5GHz. The Ryzen 9 5950X is a decked out slice of silicon constructed with 16 physical CPU cores and 32 threads of computing muscle. It has a 3.4GHz base clock and up to a 4.9GHz boost clock, plus 64MB of L3 cache, 8MB of L2 cache, PCIe 4.0 support, and all of the performance benefits of AMD's fancy Zen 3 CPU architecture. AMD's rated max boost clock does not factor in its Precision Boost Overdrive... Read more...
November will be here before we know it, and with it comes the retail availability of AMD's latest generation Ryzen 5000 series, based on Zen 3. Then we will have a clear picture of whether the new chips truly deliver upon AMD's claimed 19 percent IPC (instructions per clock) uplift over Zen 2. As we wait, more slightly-early benchmarks have emerged, at a familiar place—the Geekbench database. We have high hopes for Zen 3, based on what AMD is claiming, combined with the spattering of leaked benchmarks that have emerged since the Ryzen 5000 series was officially announced. We always have to take such things with a big pinch of salt, though generally, the closer to retail availability we... Read more...
You have questions, I have questions, we all have questions about AMD's recently announced Ryzen 5000 series, and specifically regarding how actual performance stacks up with the company's claim of a 19 percent IPC (instructions per clock) uplift over the Ryzen 3000 series. Reliable answers will have to wait until the reviews are posted. Waiting is hard, though, and while caution should be taken when looking at unofficial benchmark runs, there is another set of interesting results to digest, this time within SiSoftware's SANDRA database. This latest round of leaked data follows the recent discovery of Zen 3 benchmark results within the Cinebench R20 database, which we wrote about earlier this... Read more...
One of the last places you would expect to see a Ryzen 5000 series desktop processor is inside a Mac system. Apple is even shifting away from x86 processors altogether, having announced plans to phase out its use of Intel CPUs in favor of its own custom processors based on ARM. So what is this business about a an alleged Mac system running a Ryzen 9 5950X CPU appearing in Geekbench all about? That is a wonderful question, and rather than drag out the suspense, we will go ahead and say we do not know for sure. We have some ideas, though, one of which is a nifty Hackintosh setup. It could also be a clever fake with some fancy editing by whoever is behind this, but where is the fun in that? This... Read more...
Yowza! AMD made some bold claims during the unveiling of its Ryzen 5000 series, which will land on retail shelves next month. According to AMD, its upcoming Zen 3 chips are "the fastest gaming CPUs in the world," a boast that belonged to Intel up to this point. But is Zen 3 all that and a bag of sea salt and vinegar kettle cooked potato chips? Well, some early benchmark results on Cinebench R20 are certainly tasty. We'll get to the benchmark numbers in a moment, but first let's recap the Ryzen 5000 series lineup. AMD is kicking off the Zen 3 party with four chips: Ryzen 9 5950X ($799), Ryzen 9 5900X ($549), Ryzen 7 5800X ($449), and Ryzen 5 5600X ($299, with a Wraith Stealth air cooler included).... Read more...
The highly anticipated follow-up to AMD's blockbuster Zen 2 family of Ryzen 3000 desktop processors is finally here. AMD has announced its Ryzen 5000 desktop processor family, which is based on its all-new Zen 3 architecture. Zen 3 is still being produced on the 7nm process node, but AMD has managed to deliver a number of key improvements to provide a significant boost in performance over its predecessor. AMD Is Skipping Ryzen 4000 And Going Straight To Ryzen 5000 For Desktops But before we get into the details, we first need to talk about model naming; specifically, Ryzen 5000. Conventional wisdom would dictate that the next generation of AMD’s consumer desktop processors would be called... Read more...