Items tagged with 3dmark

Are you a PC gamer frustrated with the lack of graphics cards? Maybe you're looking forward to buying a brand-new pre-built PC with Windows 11 soon (it launches this Tuesday, after all). Well, this news may give you pause. The new operating system brings an apparently intense focus on system security, and as is common for technologies that center on security, it could have an adverse effect on performance. For pre-built systems, Windows 11 will ship with Virtualization-Based Security (VBS) enabled by default, and according to a new report from PC Gamer, that security feature can absolutely tank gaming performance. The publication was first alerted to the issue by the organization formerly known... Read more...
Most people probably have graphics card performance in mind when firing up 3DMark, a popular benchmark for helping to determine how good a system or GPU might be at playing games. The benchmark tests are actually more nuanced than that, and with the latest update, UL Benchmarks has added dedicated CPU benchmarks to the mix. You can still fire up benchmarks like Geekbench and Cinebench to test your CPU, but now 3DMark will offer up some detailed processor metrics as well. This comes courtesy of a brand new 3DMark CPU Profile section. Rather than produce a single CPU score, as the 3DMark benchmark of old had done, the updated version shows how your CPU scales and changes as applications tap into... Read more...
We already know from our Radeon RX 6900 XT review that AMD's flagship graphics card is a fast performer in its own right. It does not quite take the performance crown from NVIDIA's GeForce RTX 3090, but it is still a beastly GPU. And hey, if you have a supply of liquid nitrogen that's freezing a hole in your pocket, you might be able to push one all the way to 3.3GHz, as an overclocking team from Greece has done. Team OGS took apart AMD's flagship card, then slapped it into an ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Dark Hero motherboard alongside a Ryzen 9 5950X processor and 16GB of G.Skill DDR4 memory running at 3,800MHz. That is one heck of a powerful foundation even at stock settings. Instead of running... Read more...
Two days ago, Raja Koduri teased Intel's next-generation Xe-HGP gaming GPU running a new and, at the time, unreleased 3DMark Mesh Shader feature test. There was no information provided about the GPU, like what clockspeed it was running at or how it fared in the new benchmark. However, if you want to run it yourself, it is now available. The new test evaluates Mesh Shader performance, which is a trick that is part of the DirectX 12 Ultimate application program interface (API). Part of the reason UL added the Mesh Shader feature test to its 3DMark suite is because it "shows how game developers can boost framerates by using mesh shaders in the graphics pipeline." "Mesh shaders introduce a new approach... Read more...
A little over three years ago, Intel lured AMD's former Radeon Technologies Group (RTG) boss Raja Koduri to come over and lead its own efforts in graphics, at which time Intel also announced it intended to once again throw its hat into the discrete GPU ring, something it had not attempted since Larrabee. Building discrete GPUs from the ground up takes time, but Intel is progressing at a steady pace. The latest evidence of this is Intel teasing a gaming GPU running a 3DMark test. This is rather exciting, because up until this point, Intel has mostly shone a light on its Xe-HP and Xe-HPC efforts, and of course Xe-LP, which has already manifested in integrated form with Tiger Lake, and in discrete... Read more...
UL Benchmarks is cracking the whip when it comes to real-time ray-tracing, and has announced the immediate availability of its new dedicated DirectX Raytracing feature test within its all-encompassing 3DMark benchmark suite. The test will measure "pure ray-tracing performance" so that you can compare graphics cards like NVIDIA's first-generation GeForce RTX 20 Series cards and the current-generation GeForce RTX 30 Series cards. The benchmark will of course also support AMD's upcoming Radeon RX 6000 Series when the first cards -- the Radeon RX 6800 and Radeon RX 6800 XT -- arrive on November 18th. The more powerful Radeon RX 6900 XT arrives on December 8th. Interestingly, UL... Read more...
Yesterday, we brought you news of the new 3DMark WildLife graphics benchmark, which is the latest cross-platform test from the folks at UL Benchmarks. UL explains that WildLife is primarily tasked with measuring GPU performance across platforms, and two distinct tests are available.  The standard WildLife test is designed to give feedback on how a game performs over a short period of time. With mobile games, people typically play in brief spurts when they find some free time; be it on the bus, on the subway, or a quick battle royale session on your lunch break, but not always. The 3DMark WildLife Stress Test, on the other hand, shows how a device performs over a longer stretch... Read more...
3DMark has long been used to test and compare the performance of various kinds of devices. However, there is now a new and improved way to benchmark devices. 3DMark Wild Life allows users to test the graphics performance of Android, iOS, and Windows devices. 3DMark Wild Life includes two kinds of tests. The 3DMark Wild Life benchmark evaluates the device’s ability to provide “instant performance” over a short period of time. This particular benchmark mimics mobile games where the gameplay tends to focus on “short bursts of activity.” This benchmark will provide users with a single score. The second test is called the 3DMark Wild Life Stress Test and is intended to... Read more...
Here is a fun fact—there around 117 million lakes on the planet, covering nearly four percent of the world's land surface (thanks, National Geographic). Intel seems intent on naming a processor line after all them. Hot on the heels of Comet Lake-H making an official debut, a leaked benchmark highlights one of Intel's upcoming Tiger Lake-U processors. Before we dive into the leak, let's clear some things up. Intel's product lines typically contain Y, U, H, and S designations. Y and U parts are lower power mobile chips for thin and light laptops, and some lower power mini PCs, while H parts are higher power mobile chips for more potent laptops, like ones designed for gaming. The S parts are... Read more...
This is going to be a fun year for laptop aficionados. In case you missed it, AMD announced at CES 2020 a new line of Ryzen 4000 mobile "Renoir" processors based on its Zen 2 CPU architecture and paired with Radeon Vega graphics. The top dog in the mobile lineup is the Ryzen 7 4800H, and some newly leaked benchmarks suggest it will offer desktop-class performance in a mobile package. Laptop makers have not yet released any models with Ryzen 4000 series hardware inside, though you can expect systems to arrive soon (as in, this quarter). Sitting at the top of the stack, the Ryzen 7 4800H wields 8 cores and 16 threads of computing muscle. It has a 2.9Ghz base clock and 4.2GHz max boost clock, as... Read more...
Typically where there is smoke you will find fire, and with that said, we are fairly confident AMD will be coming out with a Radeon RX 5600 XT at some point in the near future. There are just too many related leaks for the card not to exist. The latest one that we can add to the growing pile is a set of 3DMark scores. What's neat about this latest leak is it gives us some preliminary data to compare the Radeon RX 5600 XT to the already-launched Radeon RX 5500 XT. Naturally we need to take the scores with a pinch of salt—even though we are convinced the Radeon RX 5600 XT exists, there are a multitude of reasons why leaked benchmark scores can be problematic. There are two sets of scores.... Read more...
Technically speaking, AMD's upcoming Ryzen 9 3950X is not a high-end desktop (HEDT) processor—it's a mainstream desktop chip, even though it wields 16 cores and 32 threads of computing muscle. In contrast, Intel's upcoming Core i9-10980XE is classified as an HEDT part, with 18-cores and 36 threads. Despite the different categories each CPU falls into, it's fair to compare these multi-core beasts, and a couple of recent benchmark leaks allows us to get a head start on things. Both processors have made an early appearance in the 3DMark benchmark database, with regards to the Fire Strike test. This gives us a point of comparison. Specifically, it is the Physics score we are interested in,... Read more...
UL Benchmarks (formerly known as Futuremark) has added a new Variable Rate Shading (VRS) test to its popular 3DMark benchmarking suite, and it is now available to the public. The new test taps into a feature of Microsoft's DirectX 12 API that allows developers to improve performance by selectively reducing the level of detail in parts of a frame. The idea behind VRS is to lessen the workload on a GPU and push higher framerates, without adversely affecting the overall image quality of a scene as it is perceived by the viewer. In theory, the selective reduction of detail in any given frame will occur where it will not be noticed much, if at all. "By using VRS to lower the shading rate for parts... Read more...
One of the exciting things that AMD's third-generation Ryzen processor family and accompanying X570 chipset will usher in is support for PCI Express 4.0. This offers double the bandwidth of PCI Express 3.0, paving the way for faster graphics and speedier storage drives. To help measure the impact that PCie 4.0 can have, UL Benchmarks is adding a new test to its 3DMark suite. It's actually a PCI Express feature test, meaning users will be able to run it on any modern platform, including existing PCie 3.0 motherboards. Users who dive into a newfangled Ryzen setup using the latest processors and motherboard options, however, will obviously see a better benchmark score, for whatever that is worth.... Read more...
Yes folks, there is a such thing as 'professional' overclocking, which may sound like an empty profession on the surface but actually plays an important role. That role is mainly marketing, as companies sponsor and endorse certain overclockers, in hopes of showcasing their products. If you were to take a peak into pro overclocking world right now, you would see a new world record for Port Royal, a ray tracing benchmark that UL Benchmarks recently added to 3DMark. At present, the record currently belongs to none other than Vince Lucido, otherwise known as Kingpin (or "K|NGP|N"), a nickname he derived from his skateboarding days (among other things, a kingpin is a component of the trucks on a skateboard).... Read more...
AMD recently unveiled its Radeon VII graphics card, which for the first time introduces a 7-nanometer GPU processor to the consumer gaming market (as opposed to the 7nm Radeon Instinct MI60, which is a workstation accelerator for deep learning workloads). We are all eager to find out how the card performs, and some leaked 3DMark benchmarks may provide a glimpse. Before we get to the scores, let's recap the card's specs. The Radeon VII features a 7nm Vega GPU underneath the hood with 60 compute units (CUs) and 3,840 stream processors, and is clocked up to 1.8GHz. It also boasts a whopping 16GB of second-generation high bandwidth memory (HBM2)—that's twice as much as the Radeon RX Vega 64... Read more...
Few people are going to plunk down $2,499 for NVIDIA's beastly Titan RTX graphics card if all they want to do is play games, that's a fair statement. Those that do, however, will end up with a very fast card. This is evidenced by some early benchmarks, including a 3DMark run in which an overclocked and liquid cooled Titan RTX topped 40,000 points in the Graphics test. Titan RTX, or T-Rex, as NVIDIA has appropriately nicknamed it, is built around the company's Turing GPU. It's an unabashed representation of the full Turing TU102GPU, in fact, with 4,608 CUDA cores, 576 Tensor cores, and 72 RT cores. At stock settings, it has a 1,350MHz base clock and 1,770MHz boost clock, and can pummel workloads... Read more...
Gamers and benchmarkers have been using 3DMark software to test out their video card prowess for many years. As GPU makers add new graphics card capabilities, the benchmarks have to change to keep up with the times. Not long ago we saw that the NVIDIA RTX 2080 was putting quite the beatdown on the Titan XP in the 3DMark Time Spy benchmark. Other than a raw performance increase in the RTX family, the other big deal that NVIDIA ushered in with the new graphics cards was real-time ray tracing. UL Benchmarks is rolling out a new 3DMark benchmark specifically to test out ray tracing capabilities. The benchmark is called 3DMark Port Royal, and late last month some screenshots for the demo were rolled... Read more...
UL Benchmarks' 3DMark is adding real-time ray tracing support to its suite of benchmarks thanks to support for the DirectX Raytracing API. The new test is called 3DMark Port Royal and will support any graphics card that is compatible with DirectX Raytracing. UL Benchmarks says that it worked with some of the top tech titans in the gaming industry including Intel, AMD, and NVIDIA to make sure that the benchmark is representative of the performance that we can expect from current- and next-generation hardware. Right now, the only graphics cards that support DirectX Raytracing without being hit with a severe performance penalty is NVIDIA's GeForce RTX family. Currently, the GeForce RTX... Read more...
NVIDIA's hardware partners are starting to announce custom cooled versions of the company's GeForce RTX 2070, and soon enough websites will start posting performance reviews. In the meantime, we're left to speculate about performance based on the specs, and whatever leaks there might be. As it pertains to the latter, there is a leaked 3DMark benchmark run that suggests the GeForce RTX 2070 will be faster than the GeForce RTX 1080. For anyone who has not been following the GeForce RTX launch, NVIDIA announced three new cards built around its Turing GPU architecture: GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, GeForce RTX 2080, and GeForce RTX 2070. All three feature dedicated RT cores for real-time ray tracing, or more... Read more...
The embargoes have lifted on sharing performance metrics for NVIDIA's GeForce RTX cards, and if you haven't done so already, be sure to check our in-depth review of the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti and 2080 (we also have a deep dive on Turing, if you're interested). One thing we didn't cover, however, is extreme overclocking—the Walmart clerk looked at us funny when we asked which aisle we could find liquid nitrogen. Someone else did, though, and set a new 3DMark world record in the process. His name is Vince Lucido, though you might know him better as Kingpin (or K|NGP|N). For anyone is not familiar, Kingpin is an extreme overclocker who built his first PC in 2001, and began overclocking in 2003.... Read more...
NVIDIA's new generation of GeForce RTX graphics cards are in the hands of reviewers, and today the NDA lifted on a full and exhaustive breakdown of the underlying Turing architecture, including all the new features and goodies that are underneath the hood. Performance numbers will have to wait for another day, at least officially. Unofficially, there are some leaked scores on 3DMark of the GeForce RTX 2080. What makes this leak particularly interesting is that it purports to show the performance of the GeForce RTX 2080 with a newer GPU driver package, version 411.51, which presumably has been optimized for the RTX cards. The 411.51 driver release is not yet available to the public—NVIDIA... Read more...
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