Items tagged with Adobe

Adobe is one of the biggest names in software for creating and editing photos and video. The company's Creative Cloud apps, including Photoshop, Premiere Photo, and Lightroom are the apps that most people are familiar with. However, users of older versions of Adobe Creative Cloud apps, including Photoshop, are being told to stop using these out-of-date versions or they could face infringement claims from third-party companies. Adobe hasn't named the third party company, but word on the street is that Dolby has brought the infringement claims against Adobe CC. Adobe has stated that ongoing litigation is the reason it is warning users to stop using certain versions of its apps. Adobe said in a... Read more...
Adobe doesn't have the best of histories when it comes to software like Flash and Shockwave. Both have been leveraged by nefarious types to take advantage of computer users over the years. Flash is such a risk that Firefox 69 disables it by default. Adobe has announced that Flash will see the end of its life next year. Meanwhile, Shockwave will die off before then with an official end of life date announced by Adobe. Adobe says that the end of Shockwave will be April 9, 2019. After that date, Shockwave will be discontinued, and the Shockwave Player for Windows will no longer be available for download. Adobe does note that companies with Enterprise licenses for Shockwave will receive support until... Read more...
At one point in time, it seemed like Adobe's Flash animation plugin was invincible. How could such a widely-used API ever die off? Well, as it turns out, when the plugin in question has been riddled with security vulnerabilities for most of its life, sometimes the developer will do the world a favor and put the solution out to pasture. In 2017, Adobe announced that it was doing just that. Flash was effectively dead, or at least will be by the end of 2020. Shortly after that announcement, Google announced that Chrome would cease support for the plugin at the same time, and inevitably, we knew every other browser maker would follow suit. Microsoft also jumped in vowing to kill support in 2020 for... Read more...
A new study published by Adobe Analytics that looks at the market for voice devices such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home. The study surveyed 1,000 consumers in the U.S. and looked at how people use the devices they own and what they use them for. According to the study, the most common use for voice assistant devices is music playback with 70% of owners using their device for that task. Weather forecasts came in a close second with 64% of owners using their device for figuring out what the weather will be like for the day. Asking fun questions was a common use for 53% of people along with conducting online searches, something that 47% of device owners have done. Getting news is a common activity... Read more...
Seeing is believing, but you can't always trust your eyes, especially now that we are living in the digital age of photography. For better or worse, programs like Photoshop make it all too easy to manipulate an image. It's great for photographers who want to clean up their images, but can also be used for nefarious purposes. Can you ever really be sure that what you're looking at is the real deal? Probably not, though to help with that very task, Adobe is leveraging artificial intelligence to detect when a photo has been doctored. On the surface, that might not seem like a big deal. However, we are living in an era where the bulk of information about any given topic is shared online. The ease... Read more...
Adobe has added support for Microsoft's puck-shaped Surface Dial accessory to Photoshop CC, the hugely popular photo editing program that is both feature-rich and at times complex. This is a big win for Microsoft, as app support for the Surface Dial has not exactly been robust to this point. It originally launched as a companion device to the Surface Studio all-in-one PC, but with Photoshop CC compatibility, the Surface Puck gains street cred, and a potentially bigger audience. "There is something magical about the combination of Surface Dial and Surface Pen. When you fold these capabilities in with the Adobe Creative Cloud and the collective power of Surface hardware, artists can create in more... Read more...
Are you guys ready to get rid of Flash? We here at HotHardware definitely are, and thankfully, Adobe has already seen the writing on the wall. Adobe gave us our first glimpse at the impending death of Flash back in late 2015 — we just didn’t think that it would take five years for the blood to finally drain from the plugin’ increasingly lifeless body. Adobe today confirmed that it will no longer distribute or update Flash by the close of the year 2020. Hopefully, the “true” demise of Flash will happen quickly after that point since there will be no security updates to protect users from the scores of exploits that plague the software. With no support from Adobe, customers and developers would... Read more...
For over 13 years, Microsoft has been issuing monthly security updates for Windows on what is known as Patch Tuesday, typically the second Tuesday of every month. This month's update would have fell on Valentine's Day, except that Microsoft did something highly unusual—it delayed the Patch Tuesday rollout following the discovery of a "last minute issue that could impact some customers." Now a week later, Microsoft has issued an emergency patch for a flaw in Adobe Flash Player. The out-of-band release pertains to a critical vulnerability in Adobe Flash Player that could allow an attacker to execute malicious code remotely. It affects Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows... Read more...
Once again Google and Microsoft are at odds over the former's decision to disclose a zero-day vulnerability affecting the latter's Windows operating system. Google alerted both Adobe and Microsoft on October 21, 2016, of previously disclosed security flaws it discovered and in the time that has passed Adobe has issued patch (CVE-2016-7855) and Microsoft has not. Google's policy on zero-day and other critical vulnerabilities it believes are being actively exploited in the wild is to give software makers seven days to issue a patch or advisory. Once that time period elapses, Google discloses the security to the public. In this case, Google waited 10 days before disclosing the vulnerability on Halloween.... Read more...
Flash's days on the web are numbered. That's been evident for the past couple of years as the anti-Flash movement has gained steam. Little by little, software developers and online services have been removing Flash support from their products, and starting in August, you can count Firefox among them. Well, partially anyway. Firefox isn't getting rid of Flash altogether, but the browser will begin blocking certain Flash content that Mozilla feels is not essential to the user experience. The decision to crack down on Flash plugins is one of several things Mozilla has planned to ultimately bring Firefox users improved security, better battery life, faster page loads, and better browser responsiveness.... Read more...
At its annual WWDC conference being held this week in San Francisco, Apple announced that it would be transitioning its long-running Mac OS X to "macOS". Based on the initial screenshots we've been given, there's not going to be a large departure from what we're used to from OS X, but the move is still notable considering OS X has been the chosen name for 15 years. There's a lot of history there. Well, there's also going to be history made with macOS Sierra, as Safari 10 is going to be shipping with common 'legacy' plugins disabled by default. That of course includes Adobe's much-loathed Flash plugin, one of the largest gaping holes of computer security in recent (and even not-so-recent) years.... Read more...
Adobe recently published a security advisory APSA16-03, which details a vulnerability in Adobe Flash Player version 21.0.0.242 and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh, Linux, and Chrome OS. This comes after a patch for a zero day exploit was released in early April. Adobe believes the attackers are a group called “ScarCruft”. ScarCruft is a relatively recently APT group that has launched attacks in countries such as Russia, Nepal, South Korea, China, India, Kuwait, and Romania. The group recently has taken advantage of two Adobe Flash and one Microsoft Internet Explorer exploits. ScarCruft currently has two operations called Operation Daybreak and Operation Erebus. Operation Daybreak... Read more...
It seems as though most (if not all) Internet users are awaiting the day when Adobe Flash is finally eradicated from the face of the earth. The Adobe Flash Player plugin has long been a security liability, resource nightmare and battery hog (for mobile users). Although Adobe has announced that it is winding down the use of Flash in favor of HTML5 development, we still have to deal with critical exploits until judgment day arrives. Hence the company has rushed out an emergency patch for Adobe Flash player. According to Adobe, the most serious exploit, CVE-2016-1010, has already been “used in limited, targeted attacks.” In all, the latest security bulletin covers over 20 known security issues in... Read more...
Adobe acknowledged that it muffed an update to its Creative Cloud Desktop application last week, one that caused it to delete files on a "small number" of Mac systems. Once it became aware of the issue, Adobe pulled the plug on the update and has since made another one available for both Mac and Windows systems (there's no indication that the issue affects Windows PCs). "In a small number of cases, the updater may incorrectly remove some files from the system root directory with user writeable permissions. We have removed the update from distribution, and are in the process of deploying a new update which addresses the issue. When prompted for the update, Creative Cloud members should install... Read more...
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