Items tagged with rocket lake

One of the most anticipated motherboards for Intel's 12th Gen Core "Rocket Lake" processors has finally arrived. We are talking about EVGA's Z590 Dark, which it introduced in January of this year. At the time, EVGA had not said when the board will actually release to retail or how much it will cost, but now we know. For the time being, the Z590 Dark is an "Elite Member Exclusive" item, a program users can sign up for if they have purchased an EVGA product in the past and/or are particularly active in the company's forums. As for the cost, well, brace yourself—the Z590 Dark checks in at $599.99 (MSRP). That puts it right up there with the most expensive Z590 motherboards on the market, like... Read more...
It seems Intel is about to launch a line of Xeon W processors based on Rocket Lake. One of its hardware partners certainly believes that to be true—over at ASRock, an updated CPU support list highlights a handful of mainstream Xeon W-1300 series processors, along with some basic specifications for each SKU (clockspeed, cache, and TDP). The new chips feature the same underlying architecture as Intel's recently launched 11th Gen Core desktop processors (codenamed Rocket Lake-S). There are a total of five Xeon W-1300 series processors listed, seemingly comprised of both 6-core/12-thread and 8-core/16-thread models, based on the cache arrangement. Here they are... Source: ASRock Sitting at... Read more...
Intel today officially announced its complete family of 11th generation Core (Rocket Lake-S) desktop processors. The company is promising a lot with these new desktop CPUs, including a claimed 19 percent IPC lift over its previous-gen Comet Lake-S, the inclusion of 12th generation Xe graphics on the desktop side, and full support for the PCIe 4.0 interface. Core i7-11600K (Left), Core i9-11900K on the (Right) The big IPC lift is attributed to Intel's new Cypress Cove architecture; a 14nm backport of its 10nm Sunny Cove (Ice Lake) microarchitecture. This performance boost could pay dividends in single-threaded performance -- particularly in games -- against AMD's... Read more...
We have probably said a thousand times (slight exaggeration) that Intel is expected to launch its 11th Gen Core desktop processors at the end of March, and now we can finally confirm that to be the case. Or rather, Intel has confirmed it. The official launch date is set for March 30, exactly four weeks from now, and just one day before March comes to a close. What brought about the confirmation is an inquiry after German retailer Mindfactory had been accepting pre-orders for one of Intel's upcoming Rocket Lake-S processors, and specifically the Core i7-11700K. According to the product page, which is no longer taking orders, the retailer sold "over 120" units before Intel caught wind and told... Read more...
Yesterday, we reported that Intel has effectively blocked customers who bought H410- and B460-based motherboards from upgrading to its upcoming 11th generation Rocket Lake-S processors. Those customers are effectively pigeonholed into only using 10th generation Comet-Lake based processors, which feature an LGA-1200 pinout. According to Intel's recent support document update, the only current generation motherboards that support Rocket Lake-S are those using mid-range H470 and high-end Z490 chipsets. However, some motherboard manufacturers are getting around this limitation by swapping out the H410 and B460 chipset, which are built on a 22nm process node, for the H470. Gigabyte... Read more...
Intel's upcoming 11th generation Rocket Lake family is shaping up to a be formidable force in the desktop processor market. Early leaked benchmarks have shown that Intel has worked its magic to deliver stellar IPC gains, which allow for unmatched single-threaded performance. All of this is quite remarkable given that Rocket Lake is still built on the 14nm process node. However, if you're currently running an entry-level/mid-level Intel 400-Series motherboard, we've got some bad news for you. Intel has confirmed in a new support document that motherboards using H410 and B460 chipsets will not be compatible with Rocket Lake processors. Intel just launched the H410 and B460... Read more...
Late last week, we brought you some scintillating performance numbers for Intel's upcoming Core i9-11900K Rocket Lake-S processor, which is rocking what should be the company's last hurrah for the 14nm process node on the desktop. Besides a shift to Cypress Cove CPU cores which bring a big IPC uplift, Rocket Lake-S processors also support PCIe 4.0 (which AMD first introduced with its Ryzen 3000 processors in 2019). While last week's benchmark showed the Core i9-11900K strutting its stuff in Geekbench 5.0, these latest performance figures are from PassMark. Not surprisingly, the single-threaded benchmarks are quite impressive, even beating the mighty AMD Ryzen 9 5900X. If you... Read more...
Today is not just any ordinary Tuesday. Nope, no siree, it sure is not. It is very different from almost every other Tuesday in the past several years, and do you know why? Simple—we have not one, but two upcoming Intel CPU cameos that have appeared on the web! I know, I know, today is special for another reason—it's Taco Tuesday! But enough with tacos (I vote pizza is better anyway, don't @ me). We're focused on silicon, and Intel has some important CPU launches coming up in 2021. The first of those is Rocket Lake, which figures to be the last of Intel's now-ancient 14nm node. While the competition is already on 7nm and heading to 5nm in 2021, Intel has been squeezing everything... Read more...
While the current 10th generation Comet Lake-S family rules the roost when it comes to Intel's desktop processors, a new family will be taking its place within the next 6 months. According to all of the leaked information that we've gathered over the past year, Comet Lake-S will be replaced by 11th generation Rocket Lake-S processors. A new report from Videocardz is now alleging that the first Rocket Lake-S processors will arrive in March 2021, which is a little earlier in the year than when Comet Lake-S launched during 2020. Rocket Lake-S processors will allegedly use the LGA-1200 socket that was first introduced with Comet Lake-S and will be pin-compatible with 400-Series... Read more...
Intel has updated its Compute Runtime to support both its upcoming Rocket Lake desktop processors and DG1 graphics based on its Xe GPU architecture. Looking at this broadly, this can be taken as a sign that things are progressing at a steady clip for Intel's unreleased 11th Generation Core CPUs and discrete graphics. "The Intel Graphics Compute Runtime for oneAPI Level Zero and OpenCL Driver is an open source project providing compute API support (Level Zero, OpenCL) for Intel graphics hardware architectures (HD Graphics, Xe)," Intel explains. Intel's added support is listed on GitHub for version 20.37.17906. If you scroll down to the 'Important Changes' section, you will see it lists "Added... Read more...
Roughly three weeks ago, we got our first peak at one of Intel's 11th generation Rocket Lake-S engineering samples, which is reportedly using the same LGA-1200 socket as the newly introduced Comet Lake-S family. Like all of Intel's desktop processors released over the last handful of years, Rocket Lake-S will be built on the company's aging (but still potent) 14nm process node. Today, that same 8-core/16-thread engineering sample is making another appearance, and more details about the chip are being revealed thanks to a new Geekbench listing. Given that that the current flagship Comet Lake-S processor is a 10-core/20-thread design, this Rocket Lake-S part isn't a high-end offering.... Read more...
To say that Intel's 14nm process tech is long in the tooth is quite the understatement. The company first adopted that node for its Broadwell-based processors way back in September 2014, and has soldiered on with a number of refinements since then for its mainstream desktop processors and server products. While Intel has adopted 10nm for some of its Ice Lake-based laptop processors, the company still relies on 14nm for its desktop lineup. That will continue with the company's 11th generation Rocket Lake-S processors, which may be the last hurrah for 14nm on the desktop side. RocketLake S UDIMM 6L RVP8C/16T3.2/4.3 GHz pic.twitter.com/Hw8p1P6vaa— APISAK (@TUM_APISAK) June 4, 2020... Read more...
The ink is barely dry on our review of Intel's brand new 10th generation Comet Lake-S based Core i9-10900K and Core i5-10600K processors, but we're already discovering evidence of their successors popping up in online benchmarks. We're talking of course about Intel's upcoming 11th generation Rocket Lake-S family. Rocket Lake-S processors are said to one of the final hurrah's for Intel's 14nm process tech for its mainstream desktop processors, and like its Comet Lake-S predecessors, will be available in up to 10-core configurations. The benchmark leak coming to us today is of a 6-core, 12-thread processor, which should put it squarely in Core i5 territory. This particular processor,... Read more...
Intel's 10th generation Comet Lake-S desktop processors aren't even here yet, but there's already talk about its successor: Rocket Lake-S. Comet Lake is built on Intel's 14nm CPU architecture, and will reportedly be available in up to 10-core configurations. Rocket Lake-S will also be 14nm based. According to a new report reportedly based on information from internal Intel sources, Rocket Lake-S will launch late in 2020 alongside new 500-Series motherboards. According to a leaked slide, Rocket Lake-S will feature Willow Cove microarchitecture (also found in upcoming Tiger Lake processors), albeit while being built on the 14nm process node.  We don't know anything... Read more...
Earlier this year, we heard rumors that Intel was reaching out to Samsung to help alleviate some of its supply issues with respect to 14nm chip production. At the time, it was alleged that Samsung would be producing 14nm Rocket Lake parts for Intel. However, our own sources at the time asserted that the reports were false, but would not confirm at the time whether a future deal with the South Korean chip giant was in the works. However, a new well-timed report coming out of South Korea is claiming that Samsung will produce desktop processors for Intel. The report comes from Pulse News, and says that these new processor orders from Intel will be a big boon to Samsung's "relatively... Read more...
Unless you've been living under the rock for the past 18 months, then you know that Intel has a number of discrete graphics cards in the works that will cover a broad number of market segments, from the desktop to the data center. The first products to hit the market will likely be Xe-based GPU accelerators that will be aimed at the data center market. However, the company also is developing consumer-centric graphics cards, but up until this point we haven't heard much in the way of detailed specifics on Intel's roadmap product plans, except for their fan shroud concept art. Thankfully, a new test driver accidentally made its way to the internet for a short while (version 26.20.16.9999),... Read more...
Yesterday we wrote about a Korean-language news report suggesting that Intel had commissioned Samsung, a rival of sorts in the semiconductor space (as it pertains to jockeying for the title of top semiconductor producer), to manufacture its upcoming 14-nanometer Rocket Lake CPUs. Well, we have new information debunking that claim. According to the original report by SeDaily, Intel had contracted to Samsung to handle production of Rocket Lake parts in order to make sure that supply could keep up with demand. It seemed plausible, given that Intel has dealt with shortages of some currently shipping processors, and it was a rumor that had made the rounds in the past. Nevertheless, we have since found... Read more...
Update: After reporting on this rumor yesterday, we have since learned new information debunking Samsung's involvement with Rocket Lake production. Specifically, we have it on good authority from sources close to the matter, that Samsung will in fact NOT be manufacturing CPUs of any kind for Intel. We have posted a new article with additional information. Original Article: Forget about Cannon Lake for a moment, and the troubles Intel has had in producing the 10-nanometer part, hence the multiple delays. That may end up a short-lived product as Intel looks to different 10nm chip architectures. That said, Intel is not finished squeezing its 14nm process node for all it is worth, and may enlist... Read more...