Items tagged with memory

Has there ever been a more difficult time to build or upgrade a PC, in terms of parts availability and cost? Not in recent, that is for sure. Certain parts are difficult to find in stock at MSRP, especially graphics cards, but GPUs are not the only core components that care commanding higher prices these days. DRAM pricing is on the rise too, and is expected to keep going up. Fortunately, if all you need is a kit of DDR4 memory, you can find one easy enough—places like Amazon and Newegg are littered with kits of different capacities and speeds from major players and smaller brands alike. And memory makers continue to crank out new kits. For example, HyperX just recently launched high-speed... Read more...
Do you think memory makers are antsy for next-gen platforms from AMD and Intel to arrive? There is no doubt about it, as evidenced by the suddenly steady stream of DDR5 announcements we are seeing. Geil is the latest the beat its chest over its DDR5 efforts, with the company touting fast kits that exceed JEDEC specifications, in capacities up to 128GB. Let's talk about JEDEC for a moment. Last July, JEDEC released the final specifications for DDR5, noting at the time that initial kits are expected to 4,800MHz. And indeed, we have seen a few announcements hitting those specs already, such as TeamGroup's 16GB DDR5-4800 memory kit. However, JEDEC also left it a bit open-ended, saying DDR5 will deliver... Read more...
Memory makers are busy manufacturing DDR5 modules in anticipation of Intel's upcoming Alder Lake launch and AMD's Zen 4 processors. Even though it is still relatively early (Alder Lake is likely releasing towards the end of the year, and Zen 4 in early 2022), the DDR5 announcements are piling up. The latest comes from Asgard, which is owned by Jiahe Jinwei. If the latter sounds familiar, perhaps it is because you visited us here at HotHardware yesterday—we wrote about two Chinese firms announcing DDR5 memory kits, one of which was Jiahe Jinwei (and the other Netac). It's working on both single-sided 16GB and double-sided 32GB DDR5 modules that operate at 4,800MHz and 1.1V. Likewise, the... Read more...
It is currently a horrible time to build a new gaming PC. From COVID-19 demand to chip shortages, droughts, and a cryptocurrency boom, many factors make obtaining critical components like high-end processors and graphics cards hard to find at MSRP. Over the weekend, we even heard about the potential for a shortage of SSDs and HDDs due to rising Chinese crypto coin. Today, more bad news is coming in for those looking to build a new rig or upgrade an existing one. Research firm TrendForce projects that DRAM prices will surge between 18 to 23 percent for Q2 2021 versus Q1 2021. The 18 to 23 percent range is for the overall DRAM market, but higher increases are expected for consumer PC DRAM versus... Read more...
The era of DDR5 memory will begin in earnest later this year when Intel releases its Alder Lake-S processors, followed by AMD launching its Zen 4 lineup—both will offer support for the next-generation memory standard. As that day approaches, memory makers are getting their ducks in a row. We've already seen several DDR5 announcements, and Netac is apparently hyping the development of upcoming RAM that can run at a blazing fast 10,000MHz. That's almost twice as fast as the speediest DDR4 kit on the planet, which is TeamGroup's recently announced T-Force Xtreem DDR4-5600MHz memory. Most existing DDR4 kits fall withing the 3000-4000MHz range, with higher speeds typically being reserved for... Read more...
We should count our lucky stars that PC memory pricing is not through the roof, like it was at one point—these days you can find name-brand 16GB DDR4-3200 kits selling for less than $80. That said, general pricing could be going up, right as Intel's new Rocket Lake-S lineup lifts off. Exactly how much remains to be seen. According to a TrendForce report, DRAM pricing crawled upwards by 3-8 percent in the first quarter of 2021. As we head into the second quarter, the market research firm anticipates prices going up a bit more significantly, by another 13-18 percent. To use the example above of an $80 memory kit, a price hike on the higher side could mean paying around $94 for the same RAM... Read more...
How do you make high bandwidth memory (HBM) even better? Lower for the price, for one. But aside from that, infusing it with artificial intelligence (AI) processing power is a surefire way to make HBM even more attractive for certain market segments, and that is precisely what Samsung has done—it has developed the world's HBM with AI processing power, and is calling it HBM-PIM (processing in memory). "Our groundbreaking HBM-PIM is the industry’s first programmable PIM solution tailored for diverse AI-driven workloads such as HPC, training and inference. We plan to build upon this breakthrough by further collaborating with AI solution providers for even more advanced PIM-powered applications,"... Read more...
When the power goes out at home, we tend to freak out, because heaven forbid we can't watch TV or play video games, and have to *gulp* read a book or something to pass the time. How barbaric! But when a semiconductor factory loses power, well, the repercussions are a bit more severe. Just ask Micron, which warned investors that a power outage has affected its DRAM supply in the short term. This happened at the company's Taoyuan facility (Fab 11) on December 3, the last day of its fiscal first quarter, the company said. And if that was not enough, there was a 6.7-magnitude earthquake a week later off the northeast coast of Taiwan, which affected the same factory, as well as Micron's Taichung facility... Read more...
It has been a nice, long run for the DDR4 standard, and while it is not exactly coming to a complete end, DDR5 is poised to replace it in the not-too-distant future. On next-gen platforms, anyway. Incidentally, Adata has been collaborating with MSI and Gigabyte on its upcoming DDR5 memory modules, which will feature much faster speeds than DDR4. Next-gen DDR5 RAM is among the hardware lineup that Adata plans to showcase at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) next week. It will also have on tap some PC cases, SSDs, an all-in-one liquid cooler, and another PCIe 4.0 SSD, among other things (including gaming gum, of all things). "The future of DRAM is here in the form of the Adata DDR5 DRAM module.... Read more...
Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, has a history of posting angry rants on various topics. Several of them have been directed at Intel, like when he ripped the company a new one after what he felt was a lackluster response to Spectre and Meltdown CPU flaws. More recently, however, he went on a tirade against Intel, blaming the company for stifling the ECC memory market on the consumer side. While he had some harsh words for Intel, that was not the end of it—he posted some follow-up thoughts on the situation. Before we get to those, let's talk about triggered him in the first place. In a Linux kernel mailing thread, the topic turned to AMD's Ryzen processors supporting ECC memory, and... Read more...
The clock is ticking on DDR4, and TeamGroup is eager to adopt the next-gen DDR5 memory standard as quickly as possible. As such, the memory announced today that it will be releasing its first "Elite" branded DDR5 memory product in the second half of next year. In the process, TeamGroup may have also tipped what AMD and Intel have planned for next year, because it is working with both semiconductor companies on this release. "TeamGroup has made ample preparations in 2020 to take the lead in the DDR5 market and will coordinate its releases with the DDR5 platforms of the top two CPU manufacturers, Intel and AMD. The company’s DDR5 memory is expected to be available as early as Q3 2021," TeamGroup... Read more...
Samsung is keeping its foot firmly pressed on the gas pedal by entering into mass production of its third-generation 16-gigabit (Gb) LPDDR5 memory chips for mobile devices, like its upcoming Galaxy S21 handset. Leveraging its most advanced process node (dubbed 1z), this is the first version of 16Gb LPDDR5 to be mass produced using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. "The 1z-based 16Gb LPDDR5 elevates the industry to a new threshold, overcoming a major developmental hurdle in DRAM scaling at advanced nodes," said Jung-bae Lee, executive vice president of DRAM Product and Technology at Samsung Electronics. "We will continue to expand our premium DRAM lineup and exceed customer demands, as we... Read more...
We all know that bigger is better, right? At least in generalities, it's often true. More CPU cores help performance in multi-threaded workloads, while high frequencies boost performance in lightly-threaded tasks. With graphics, it's all about more as well; more shading resources, more ROPs, more VRAM, and a wider bus means more frames per second. About the only way more doesn't help is when it's the wrong kind of more, as in latency. If a monitor has a long response time, it can hurt your game play. Similarly, if system memory has higher latency on data requests from the CPU, to help it complete its task at hand, the process stalls when every nanosecond counts. It was in this vein that ADATA's... Read more...
For the first time ever, Samsung is applying extreme ultraviolet (EUV) technology to its production of dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) modules, and has already shipped one million of them in DDR4 form. Looking further down the road, Samsung anticipates this leading to more cutting-edge EUV process nodes, including what will be used on its upcoming DDR5 memory chips next year. No other memory maker has yet adopted EUV in DRAM production, so in that regard, Samsung earns itself a bit of bragging rights. More importantly for customers, this could potentially lead to lower pricing due to better yields, and faster performance. To what extent, however, remains to be seen, but we should find out... Read more...
Samsung on Tuesday announced it has begun mass producing 16-gigabyte (GB) low power DDR5 (LPDDR5) mobile DRAM packages that will the next generation of premium smartphones. The memory maker is the first the mass produce these parts, just as it was when it began mass producing 12GB LPDDR5 packages in July of last year. The move to 16GB LPDDR5 packages not only brings more capacity, but faster speeds as well. According to Samsung, this will help enable cutting edge technologies, and in particular enhanced 5G experiences and artificial intelligence (AI) workloads. Specifically, Samsung pointed to "graphics rich gaming and smart photography" as being beneficiaries of its new memory packages. In terms... Read more...
Good news folks, the era of DDR5 memory is upon us, let's all celebrate! Well, sort of—you may want to buy the cheap champagne instead of the good stuff. Micron announced it is mass producing the world's first low power DDR5 DRAM (LPDDR5), which will find its way into high-end smartphones starting with Xiaomi's Mi 10. Apologies if we got you excited about DDR5 infiltrating the PC landscape—that will have to wait for another day (though it's coming). For now, LPDDR5 is bound for the mobile segment, and with comes "superior power efficiency" and faster speeds to keep pace with gains in artificial intelligence and 5G connectivity technologies. "Micron’s leadership in delivering... Read more...
The name "Flashbolt" sounds like it could be a comic book superhero, or a spell you cast when running up against some ruffians in a role playing game. Neither of those things are what Samsung had in mind when launching Flashbolt, which is actually its third-generation high bandwidth memory 2E (HBM2E) designed for high performance computing (HPC) applications. Samsung's unveiling comes hot on the heels of JEDEC publishing an updated revision of the HBM2 standard called JESD235C. The updated standard pushes speeds to 3.2Gbps per pin, paving the way for 410GB/s of memory bandwidth per stack. And so it goes with Samsung's new Flashbolt solution, which adheres to those specs. "With the introduction... Read more...
If you are on the fence about pouncing on a graphics card upgrade, you may want to go ahead pull the trigger. For one, the GPU is the most important component when it comes to playing games, and trying to get by with an old and outdated card can mean having to constantly fiddle with in-game settings. However, there potentially is a more pressing reason to upgrade—higher prices on the horizon. We are not sounding the alarm by any means. However, market research firm TrendForce, a division of DRAMeXchange, is expecting a "sharp upturn" in graphics DRAM prices in the first quarter of 2020 (unlike PC DRAM). Analysts say server DRAM prices will lead the upwards trend in pricing due to supply... Read more...
For the average user, 32GB of RAM is a lot (the sweet spot is generally considered to be half as much). Be that as it may, G.Skill is introducing a handful of new high capacity, high performance DDR4 memory kits consisting of multiple 32GB modules, offering a total capacity of up to a whopping 256GB. That might even be enough to satiate Chrome! It's certainly brag-worthy, though whether or not 256GB of system memory makes sense depends entirely on what kinds of things you are doing. For gaming, 256GB is excessive and not worth the cost (those dollars could be better spent on a high end GPU). But for heavy content creation or certain workstation chores, like running multiple virtual machines,... Read more...
SK Hynix is not the first company in the world to develop an HBM2E DRAM product—that distinction belongs to Samsung, which announced HBM2E DRAM of its own back in May—but the company is retaining bragging rights nonetheless. That's because SK Hynix's new HBM2E DRAM sports the industry's highest bandwidth. According to SK Hynix, its new HBM2E product can top 460 gigabytes per second (GB/s), based on 3.6 gigabits per second (Gbps) performance per pin with 1,024 data I/Os. That is a 50 percent jump over HBM2. It also scales to twice the capacity, paving the way for 16GB solutions by way of stacking eight 16Gb chips in a dense package. SK Hynix sees its HBM2E DRAM being used in a variety... Read more...
Samsung Electronics is a name that many most closely associate with smartphones like the Galaxy Note 10 that has leaked multiple times and the current Galaxy S10e, S10, and S10+. However, Samsung also sells lots of hardware components to device makers, particularly memory chips. Much of the profits the company earns are tied to memory chip sales, and those profits have dropped more than 50%. Memory chip prices have plummeted recently and have taken Samsung's profits along for the ride. Samsung Electronics recently reported its profits for the quarter that ended in June. Samsung says that operating profits from the quarter were 6.6 trillion won, or about $5.6 billion. That is a decline of 55.61%... Read more...
Samsung has started mass producing high capacity 12-gigabit (Gb) LPDDR5 memory that will find its way into flagship smartphones, the company announced on Thursday. According to Samsung, the new memory chips are optimized for enabling 5G connectivity and artificial intelligence features future phones. That is really a topical way of saying the new premium memory chips are faster than the previous generation. They are also more power efficient, using up to 30 percent less power by way of a new circuit design with enhanced clocking, training, and a low-power feature, Samsung says. "With mass production of the 12Gb LPDDR5 built on Samsung’s latest second-generation 10-nanometer (nm) class process,... Read more...
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