Items tagged with Malware

Security researchers at Kaspersky have identified a new strain of malware affecting Chrome and Firefox browsers. The researchers say the malware's authors "put a lot of effort" into how it manipulates digital certificates and mucks with outbound TLS traffic, which ultimate compromises encrypted communications. "Analysis of the malware allowed us to confirm that the operators have some control over the target’s network channel and could replace legitimate installers with infected ones on the fly. That places the actor in a very exclusive club, with capabilities that few other actors in the world have," Kaspersky says. The malware allows an attacker to wreak havoc on a victim's PC remotely.... Read more...
The battle against malware never ends. Nearly 200 harmful apps were discovered in the Google Play Store in September 2019. These apps were installed by over 335 million users. Most of the harmful ads contained malicious or misleading malware. These apps were downloaded by more than 300 million people. Google removed 46 apps alone from Chinese developer iHandy. Most of their apps feature tools for selfies, security and antivirus utilities, keyboards, horoscopes, emoji, and health. The developer claims that they attract more than 180 million monthly users. Google noted that the apps included “deceptive or disruptive” ads, which violates their policies. The apps even drained users' batteries... Read more...
Malware has been a common problem within the Google Play Store, and two apps that have run a malicious adware scheme have been the latest to get the boot. The apps have been raking in the cash for their authors, but have consequently been putting the people who have downloaded them through living hell. The first of the app is called Sun Pro Beauty Camera, and it amassed over 1 million downloads since it first appeared on the Play Store. The second app, Funny Sweet Beauty Camera, which was created by the same developer, garnered in excess of 500,000 downloads. Not only would the apps display intrusive ads that were hard or nearly impossible to close out (even when the apps in question were... Read more...
The latest “Joker” spyware is no laughing matter as it can easily compromise a lot of the personal data you keep on your phone. Researchers recently discovered spyware that can access your SMS messages, contact list and other information. The spyware was found in over 24 Android apps on Google Play and has infected nearly 500,000 users. The “Joker” spyware was originally detected this past June and was named after one of its command-and-control (C2) domain names. It can gain access to a victim’s SMS messages, contacts list, and other specific device information. It can also sign victims up for premium subscription services without their knowledge. The Joker is able... Read more...
Earlier this week, you brought you the news of an unfortunate turn of events that resulted in the popular app CamScanner being removed from the Google Play Store. The app, which can create PDF documents, is developed by CC Intelligence and has been downloaded over 100 million times. The problem came into play when users began getting bombarded with "unwanted features" and advertisements that took over their smartphone's display. The folks at Kaspersky Lab were able to determine that the CamScanner was carrying a malicious module dubbed Trojan-Dropper.AndroidOS.Necro.n, which was serving intrusive ads to users. After staying mum on the situation for most of the week, CamScanner's developers... Read more...
There's trouble brewing in the Google Play Store... again. This time the threat comes from CamScanner, which for quite some time has been a popular app that allows Android users to create PDF documents using optical character recognition (OCR) technology. The app was developed by Chinese firm CC Intelligence. However, in recent weeks, it appears that CamScanner has taken a turn for the worse, and has unleashed a malware campaign on unsuspecting Android users. CamScanner had previously used in-app ads and in-app purchases for its monetization efforts, but recent versions of the app have included a new advertising library tainted with a trojan. The malicious module has been identified... Read more...
Microsoft is warning Windows users of several new "wormable" exploits similar in style to BlueKeep, two of which are tagged as critical Remote Code Execution (RCE) vulnerabilities. As with BlueKeep, which Microsoft patched a few months ago, the exploits exist within the Remote Desktop Services protocol (formerly known as Terminal Services). These types of exploits are especially worrisome because of their ability to spread through a computer network, once a single machine is infected. "It is important that affected systems are patched as quickly as possible because of the elevated risks associated with wormable vulnerabilities like these, and downloads for these can be found in the Microsoft... Read more...
Security researchers have discovered it is possible to hack a digital SLR camera with Wi-Fi capabilities (fast becoming a common feature in modern DSLR cameras) to install ransomware, thereby hijacking a user's photographs. Just as it happens on a PC, the photos would be encrypted, with the attacker threatening to permanently delete them if a ransom is not paid. "Although most users connect their camera to their PC using a USB cable, newer camera models now support WiFi. This means that what was once a PTP/USB protocol that was accessible only to the USB connected devices, is now also PTP/IP that is accessible to every WiFi-enabled device in close proximity," Check Point says. According to Check... Read more...
We've simply grown accustomed to reading about Android malware on a regular basis, but this latest entry is both intriguing and incredibly dastardly in its deeds. Called Agent Smith, this malware has already infected 25 million Android devices globally with adware. Of those 25 million devices, India has been hit the hardest, taking the brunt of the attacks with 15 million infected devices. Agent Smith, which was first observed in the wild by Check Point Research earlier this year, has been coursing through the Google Play Store. After monitoring the its attack vector, Check Point Research was able to summarize Agent Smith's modus operandi into three parts. First, the malware lurks in... Read more...
182 Android apps have been linked to an adware campaign that has plagued users who download apps from Google Play. Trend Micro detected the adware campaign identified as AndroidOS_HiddenAd.HRXAA and AndroidOS_HiddenAd.GCLA. The adware was hidden inside free-to-download game and camera apps, the majority of which were found on the Google Play Store and had millions of downloads collectively. The adware behind the campaign was disguised as game and camera apps and was discovered in mid-June. Trend Micro says that it generated heuristic patterns that were used to analyze other samples it had detected and were able to deduce that the adware campaign had been active since 2018. All of the apps that... Read more...
This mobile app is definitely something to scream about in more ways than one. The Android game “Scary Granny ZOMBYE Mod: The Horror Game 2019” s stealing users’ Google and Facebook data. The malicious app attempts to siphon both data and money from its users to attackers.  “Scary Granny ZOMBYE Mod: The Horror Game 2019” was a horror game that mimicked another popular Android game “Granny”. Users were tasked with running away from zombies while uncovering extra lives and various weapons. The game was installed over 50,000 times and boasted a 4-star review in the Google Play store before it was removed on June 27th. Image credit: Wandera Security... Read more...
It is often recommended that one of the best ways to avoid malware on mobile devices is to stick with established, reputable app stores. The two big ones are Google's Play Store and Apple's App Store, for Android and iOS, respectively. But is this a foolproof way to avoid malware? The answer is no, according to a two-year study. The study was conducted by researchers from the University of Sydney and Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization's Data61. It focused solely on Android apps in the Play Store. The researchers found that counterfeit apps impersonating popular legitimate apps have become so sneaky that even a tech-savvy user might struggle to detect that something is... Read more...
With good intentions, Samsung took to Twitter to remind smart TV owners to scan their televisions for malware, and the Internet reacted about as you would expect. Snarky and indignant replies followed, and of course so did the jokes. And with good reason—after all, Samsung just made one heck of an argument to avoid buying a smart TV. We understand that periodically scanning our PCs for viruses and other malware comes with the territory. To a lesser extent, this can be true of smartphones and tablets, particularly if you venture away from reputable store fronts to grab your apps. But have we really reached a point where we must also scan our TVs? Apparently so, according to Samsung, which... Read more...
An auction for a netbook model from 2008 that is running Windows XP SP3 has fetched more than $1.3 million from its final bid, with the buyer owning quite possibly the most expensive laptop in the world. Why did it sell for so much? It contains half a dozen malware samples that have collectively caused over $95 billion in financial damages. The laptop is appropriately called "The Persistence of Chaos" and, according to the seller, it is an art piece. Guo O Dong, a "contemporary Internet artist whose work critiques modern day extremely-online culture," collaborated with Deep Instinct, a cybersecurity company, which provided the malware. Normally, a Samsung NC10 netbook would be an innocuous piece... Read more...
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