Items tagged with Chromium

Earlier this month, links to the Microsoft Edge Canary and Dev Channels for macOS leaked early. The spread of the Chromium-based Edge browser to macOS came months after the browser was first released for Windows 10. However, that early leak for macOS wasn't officially supported by Microsoft... until now. Microsoft today officially announced the public availability of Edge for macOS vis the Canary Channel. For those that are not up-to-date on Chromium channels, Canary builds are pushed daily and will likely be full of bugs. The Dev Channel is updated weekly and is generally more stable. Then there's the Beta Channel, which offers the most stable experience for early testers. "Microsoft... Read more...
Microsoft recently announced a number of interesting features for its upcoming Chromium-based version of Microsoft Edge. The features are primarily aimed at helping businesses and enhancing privacy. Microsoft’s new version of Edge includes a new “IE Mode”, Collections, and web tracker blocking. Microsoft has specifically designed several things for businesses. Businesses are notorious for their slow adoption of new technology. Microsoft wanted to make the transition to Edge as seamless as possible. Their new “IE Mode” will allow businesses to load old sites directly into the new web browser. The mode will utilize Internet Explorer’s rendering engine and load... Read more...
Microsoft is hard at work on its new Chromium-based browser and delivered its first Chromium-based browser test build about a month ago. However, a big issue with the Chromium-based browsers has been discovered on Windows 10, and it can seriously impeded performance. The issues was brought to light by browser maker Vivaldi and a Google researcher; for its part, Microsoft is working on a fix for the issue. The browser performance problem has to do with a Windows 10 security feature, but it's unclear if end-users of Chromium-based browsers are affected by the issue. The performance issue did pose enough of a challenge to Vivaldi that it appealed to Microsoft and Google for a fix. Microsoft's... Read more...
Microsoft surprised many when it decided that was going to abandon its homegrown EdgeHTML rendering engine for Edge in favor of Google Chromium. The move particularly incensed Firefox developer Mozilla, which said that Microsoft was “officially giving up” and conceding to Google. In the four months since that initial announcement, we’ve learned more about the “new” Microsoft Edge browser, and early test builds of the browser have even leaked to the internet in recent weeks. Now, the company has opened up its official Microsoft Edge Insider Channel for those that want to legitimately test the new browser. Microsoft Edge is currently available... Read more...
Microsoft is in the process of rebuilding its Edge browser around Chromium, the same open source project that powers Google's own Chrome browser. The transition will not happen overnight—Microsoft said in December that the move will happen over the "next year or so," with no specific date mentioned. That said, testing has already begun, and you can kick the rebuilt browser's tires right now, if you want. Just as Microsoft does with Windows, it is testing new builds of its rebuilt Edge browser through an Insider program. "Calling all developers and tinkerers: your voices will help us shape the next version of Microsoft Edge. Sign up to be the first to know when preview builds are available,"... Read more...
Microsoft is rebuilding its Edge browser around the same rendering and JavaScript engines that drive Google's Chrome browser, a move that could see a public release by the end of the year. In the meantime, development has already begun. As such, the inevitable leaks have started rolling in, giving us an early glimpse of Edge in its reborn form. Click to Enlarge (Source: Neowin) As currently constructed, Edge is powered by EdgeHTML (rendering) and Chakra (JavaScript). However, Microsoft made the surprise announcement in December that it was gutting Edge and moving to Chromium, the same open source platform that powers Chrome, which will see Blink and V8 replace EdgeHTML and Chakra, respectively.... Read more...
There are mixed opinions on Microsoft's decision to rebuild its Edge browser around Chromium, the same open source platform that powers Google's own Chrome browser. For at least one Microsoft programmer, however, the decision is not only the right one for Edge, but Mozilla should "get down from its philosophical ivory tower" and do the same thing with Firefox. Microsoft announced its own plans to embrace Chromium in December, saying at the time that it would be a somewhat slow transition over the course of this year, with its first preview build expected to debut in early 2019. What this ultimately entails is ripping out its browser's EdgeHTML rendering and Chakra JavaScript engines, and replacing... Read more...
Microsoft may have hoped that its Edge browser for Windows 10 would come to dominate Chrome and Firefox, but that never came to be, and never will, at least not in its current form. Instead, the Redmond outfit recently announced plans to overhaul Edge and rebuild it around Chromium, the same platform that powers Chrome. Interestingly, however, Microsoft can (and does) claim a victory over its rivals in the browser space. It has nothing to do with market share, as Firefox and especially Chrome are both more widely used than Edge, according to data collected by places like Net Applications and Stat Counter. Where Microsoft claims its victory is in battery life. "The Microsoft Edge team measured... Read more...
There are big changes coming to the Microsoft Edge browser in 2019, namely the abrupt shift from the EdgeHTML rendering engine to Google's Chromium. With that move, Microsoft is also decoupling Edge from the Windows 10 operating system, which means that we can expect more frequent updates for users (with regards to security, features, and performance). With this in mind, the Microsoft Insider program will expand to include the newly independent Edge browser, and the Redmond, Washington-based software giant is now accepting applications. Microsoft isn't giving many details on when the program will officially open, but you can at least get your name on the list to be one of the early testers... Read more...
If you can't beat 'em, join 'em. That seems to have been the case when Microsoft officially announced earlier this month that it would be abandoning its own EdgeHTML rendering engine used for the Edge browser in favor or Google's Chromium. At the time, Microsoft said that this move was an effort to "create better web compatibility for our customers and less fragmentation of the web for all web developers." However, according to a Hacker News post by Joshua Bakita, who served as an intern on Edge team, Microsoft was basically left with no choice but to join the Google fold. If his accounts are accurate, it seems as though Google was actively looking for ways to thwart competing... Read more...
With Google's Chrome web browser being the most popular browser out there right now, new features for the browser are something that many web surfers look forward to. Google is reportedly working on a new feature that will stop one nefarious tactic websites use to keep you from leaving their site. Specifically, a new version of Chrome will stop websites from preventing the back button from working. Google calls the act of breaking the back button "history manipulation." The first hints that Google was working to stop this sort of manipulation came from code spotted inside the Chromium project; this is the core code that the Chrome browser is based upon. This code suggested that the Chrome feature... Read more...
Microsoft made somewhat of a surprise announcement last week when it detailed plans to overhaul its struggling (in terms of market share) Edge browser and rebuild it around Chromium (much to Mozilla's dismay), the exact same platform that powers Google's own customized Chrome browser. That's a big change, but will Edge support Chrome's extensive library of extensions? If all goes to plan, the answer is yes. Microsoft is rebuilding its Edge browser around Chromium That wasn't a topic Microsoft chose to address in its blog post announcing the upcoming change to Edge. However, Edge product manager Kyle Alden stated in a discussion on Reddit that his browser team has every intention of baking in... Read more...
Earlier this week a rumor surfaced that Microsoft was moving its Edge browser from its own custom EdgeHTML rendering engine over to Chromium. Microsoft confirmed that rumor as accurate yesterday despite not giving a firm timeline for when the move would happen. All Microsoft said for a timetable was "in the next year or so" and noted that Edge on Chromium would be updated more frequently and would land for macOS. Naturally, Mozilla isn't happy at all about Microsoft's decision on adopting Chromium. Mozilla says that Microsoft is "officially giving up" on an independent shared platform for the internet. It goes on to write that by adopting Chromium, Microsoft has handed Google even more control... Read more...
Not long ago a rumor was making the rounds that Microsoft's Edge browser was going to move to Chromium as its rendering engine. Microsoft has now confirmed that move to Chromium will be happening. The software giant says that it has increased its participation in the open source software (OSS) community and is one of the largest supporters in the world of OSS projects. Redmond says that the move to Chromium will create better web compatibility for customers and less fragmentation of the web for developers. Microsoft also announced its intention to become a "significant" contributor to the Chromium project in a way that will benefit both its Edge browser and other browsers. While EdgeHTML is being... Read more...
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