Items tagged with Chromium

When Google announced Chrome nearly a decade ago, one of its promises was to deliver a more stable browser. The company used sandbox techniques to make sure that if a process in a tab goes screwy, it won't take down the rest of the browser with it. At first, it did almost feel like the browser was uncrashable, but the reality is, nothing is uncrashable. Eventually, once user apps began tying themselves into Chrome, the browser immediately became more vulnerable to crashing. It's not hard to understand why: if you inject code into a running application, there's no reason to expect that it's going to handle it gracefully. Google says that folks running apps that inject code into Chrome are 15%... Read more...
It’s been a long time coming, but Google today announced that the iOS version of Chrome has now joined its Chromium open source project. Chrome doesn’t have nearly the same penetration rate on iOS that it does on other platforms, but it provides a safe haven for users that prefer Google services and are partial to Apple hardware. In case you’re not up to speed on the iOS version of Chrome, Apple requires third-party browsers to use the same rendering engine as Safari: Apple’s WebKit. On the other hand, alternate versions of Chrome — available for Windows, macOS, Linux and Android — make use of Google’s Blink rendering engine. According to Google, up until this point, it didn’t make much sense... Read more...
If you’re running Android 4.3 or earlier, you’re pretty much out of luck when it comes to a baked-in defense against a WebView vulnerability that was discovered earlier this month by security analyst Tod Beardsley. The vulnerability leaves millions of users open to attack from hackers that choose to exploit the security hole. For those that don’t already know, WebView is a core component of the Android operating system that renders web pages. The good news is that the version of WebView included in Android 4.4 KitKat and Android 5.0 Lollipop is based on Chromium and is not affected by the vulnerability. The bad news is that those running Android 4.3 and earlier are wide open, which means that... Read more...
The Opera browser has been a beloved alternative in the web browser market, although statistically speaking it’s been an also-ran in terms of market share. The company is working to change that with its latest Opera browser release, Opera Next 15. This version of Opera is a major one, as instead of tweaking the existing version the team built it from scratch, this time using the Chromium engine, which is an effort to embrace more web standards and higher performance. Speed Dial In addition to a new look, new features include Speed Dial, which is a shortcut tool that lets users organize their favorites into folders, as well as Discover, which is designed to bring you “a selection of... Read more...
Software bugs are the gift that keep on giving, so long as companies like Google continue to offer up bounties for little critters that run amok on top of good code. We're not talking about chump change, either. On the contrary, Google forked over $14,337 in finder fees for the discovery of 32 vulnerabilities in Chrome, which the sultan of search then patched en route to rolling out Chrome 14 to its Stable channel. The biggest payout was for a bug that granted unintended access to V8 built-in objects, a discovery that netted the finder $2,337. Other vulnerabilities were worth anywhere from $500 to $2,000 each, which Google can easily afford to pay, and bug hunters are more than happy to accept.... Read more...
If there's one thing Chrome is known for besides speed, it's the browser's minimalist interface. Unlike Firefox, which offers several search engines in their own secondary space, Chrome has a very less-is-more attitude towards the UI. The team has recently published several concept designs its currently working on, one of which could end up being the default on a future browser release.   The first image above is the classic browser mode that Chrome currently uses. Below it, on the left, is what Google is calling Compact mode. The image to the right represents "sidetab" configuration. Officially, the team is considering all four options, but the only advantage listed under classic is "Similarity... Read more...
Last week, Google open-sourced its Chromium OS project, more than a year before the operating system is scheduled for release. In doing so, Google hopes a variety of developers and companies will become involved in the project, and has pledged to release regular updates as well as a comprehensive log of bug reports and fixes. We've spent a few days playing with Chromium and exploring its design and come away impressed—but not without questions. This article should not be considered a review of Chromium in any way—at most, it's a very early preview. We won't be discussing performance or spending too much time on the operating system's "look and feel." Google has stated up front that a number of... Read more...
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