Items tagged with Raspberry-Pi

The Raspberry Pi is a very cheap developer board that can be used for many different types of electronics projects and has been around for years, advancing through multiple iterations. During the coronavirus outbreak, we've seen fun projects and lifesaving devices created using the cheap single-board computer. Sales of the Raspberry Pi have boomed during the coronavirus outbreak hitting 640,000 units in March. That 640,000 units sold figure is the second-biggest month for sales of the Raspberry Pi since the device first hit the market. Some of the record number of Pi sales would have been made even if the coronavirus wasn't an issue, but many buyers are taking advantage of the cheap developer... Read more...
We've seen Raspberry Pi single-board computers for all sorts of contraptions, but this latest usage case is equal parts humorous and timely given our current situation with the COVID-19/coronavirus pandemic. Developers from the Finnish firm Surrogate have created a claw machine game that you can play from the comfort of quarantine in your home. Now to be certain, this is a fully-fledged claw machine, like one you might find at an arcade or carnival event. But it is controlled via a Raspberry Pi and is internet-connected so that anyone can get in queue to take their chances at scoring a prize. However, in this case, you're not vying for the chance to score a stuffed animal or a Buzz Lightyear... Read more...
Fully-assembled MiSTer FPGA DIY console It seems like it wasn't too long ago that we crowned the Raspberry Pi 4 as one of the best retro game consoles around. Indeed, the Raspberry Pi foundation's latest single-board computer still a low-cost DIY powerhouse. However, retro gamers are picky about one thing that haunts many software emulation solutions that run on the likes of the Pi 4 or an NVIDIA SHIELD Android TV -- and that's lag. Thanks to a talented group of developers and some off-the-shelf parts, the MiSTer project aims for a lag-free, higher quality, more accurate retro gaming experience. Built on the Terasic DE10-nano (an Intel-based System-on-Chip (SoC) FPGA board), the MiSTer... Read more...
The Raspberry Pi 4 is one of the cheapest single-board computers around, and thanks to its substantial performance boost over its predecessors, it also represents a good bang for the buck if you're interested in learning Linux, or just want to kick back and play some of your favorite retro games in Lakka. The good news is, the latest version of the Raspberry Pi Foundation's Linux distribution, Raspbian Buster, comes with a new firmware revision for the tiny system which removes the previously imposed 2 GHz clock speed limit and loosens restrictions on voltage boosts, so of course we had to take it for a spin and run some tests.  Preparing The Raspberry Pi 4 For OC Action If you're interested... Read more...
When we last visited Rock Pi last year, the company had announced the Rock Pi 4 with a hexa-core big.LITTLE ARM64 based system-on-a-chip (SoC), up to 4GB of RAM, and support for M.2 storage. Now, Rock Pi is back at it again with another single board PC that operates in the same space as the expansive Raspberry Pi family of devices. Meet the the new Rock Pi S, which is a diminutive little device that measures just 3.8cm2.  Powering the Rock Pi S is a quad-core Rockchip RK3308 SoC. All four cores are using reference 64-bit Cortex-A35 designs, come clocked at 1.3GHz, and are paired with either 256MB or 512MB of RAM.  Despite its small size, the Rock Pi S still comes relatively packed... Read more...
The Commodore 64 holds a Guinness World record as the highest-selling single computer model of all time. After its initial release in August 1982, the C64 went on to sell millions of units – outselling all other popular 8-bit machines at the time, including the Apple II. For many long-time technology geeks, including me, the Commodore 64 was the first personal computer they ever owned. So, it’s no surprise that all these years later, the machine still hold a special place in our hearts. It is with that in mind, along with knowing how popular our Building An Amiga Emulator article was, that we decided to show you how to build your own ultra small form factor Commodore 64 emulator,... Read more...
An updated version of the Raspberry Pi Model B has launched, and this new "Plus" version offers a number of upgrades. The official name is the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ and it is on sale now for the same $35 price as the previous version of the developer board.  Updates include: A 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU Dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2 Faster Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0) Power-over-Ethernet support (with separate PoE HAT) Improved PXE network and USB mass-storage booting Improved thermal management The maximum CPU clock for the B+ is 200MHz higher than the previous version and the wired and wireless network throughput is three times that... Read more...
A myriad of devices are powered by processors or SoCs featuring ARM technology. From your smartphone or smartwatch, to your router or media streamer -- and a multitude of devices in between -- odds are that an ARM-based processor has some sort of impact on your daily life. While out covering ARM TechCon, which is currently underway in Santa Clara, we got a glimpse of a device being built by Heartfelt Technologies leveraging ARM processors by way of the popular Raspberry Pi, that could actually end up saving your life.The device is wall-mounted camera system for in-home patient monitoring, which captures cardiovascular information whenever a patient walks past. The camera system specifically looks... Read more...
Dave Haynie, one of the chief engineers that worked on the Amiga back in its heyday, put it best when he said, “Amiga users make Macintosh users look like PC users”, in the Viva Amiga documentary that was released early this year. Those of us that were around when the Amiga initially debuted knew Commodore had something special on its hands. At the time of its launch, the Amiga was the most advanced personal computer money could buy – bar none. It offered multimedia features that were unmatched for many years, it was affordably priced (relatively speaking), and was the first personal computer with true multi-tasking capabilities, among numerous other things.Despite the Amiga’s superiority, Commodore... Read more...
ASUS first announced its competitor for the Raspberry Pi 3 back in late January. Aimed at DIY enthusiasts, the Tinker Board promises unmatched performance and connectivity options compared to the perennial favorite in this arena. Today, ASUS is announcing that the Tinker Board is now available in North America, where it will be priced at $54.99. ASUS says that the single-board system is capable of powering all of your projects from robots to media boxes to coding machine for budding programmers. The Tinker Board is powered by a Rockchip RK3288 quad-core ARM SoC that is clocked at 1.8GHz, and has an integrated Mali-T764 GPU (600MHz). The Tinker Board is no slouch when it comes to rest of its specs... Read more...
If you’re a Raspberry Pi developer that is at all interested in artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, we’ve got a treat in store for you. Google is looking to bring its AI and machine learning tools to the Raspberry Pi starting this year, but it wants your help and input to make it happen. Google has launched a survey that includes questions about how often developers spend working on software and hardware projects, and if they are interested in fields ranging from wearables to drones to IoT to robotics to 3D printing. It will use input gained from this survey to narrow its focus on the tools that are provided later this year. Google writes: Thank you for taking the time to take... Read more...
Retro gaming made a major resurgence this past holiday season, with the release of Nintendo’s ultra-hyped NES Classic, a scaled down clone of the original Nintendo Entertainment System. Out of the box, the NES Classic has thirty preloaded game titles, though some recent hacks exposed a method for uploading more if you're willing to mess with it. That's all well and good, but if you weren’t able to get your hands on one this past holiday season -- like the majority of people -- getting your retro-gaming fix isn't happening any time soon, unless you fork out an unreasonable sum, paying hundreds to scalpers, for a product that retails for $60.But, why not roll your own? The Elusive NES Classic... Read more...
Since it first hit the market in 2012, the Raspberry Pi has gone through numerous iterations and has become a popular sidekick for students and hobbyists alike. People use the low-priced mini computers are used to shoot down ace pilots in aerial combat simulations, they power retro arcade systems, and can be found in countless experiments by students of all ages. The low cost of entry and the seemingly limitless ideas that are possible with the Raspberry Pi platform is why founder Eben Upton is today announcing an incredible milestone — 10 million units have been shipped to date. “Thanks to you, we’ve beaten our wildest dreams by three orders of magnitude, and we’re only just getting started,”... Read more...
With vehicle makers focusing on making our future travel autonomous, a major concern arises: is it going to be safe and secure? If companies expect people to trust their lives with their technology, it goes without saying that it must be bullet-proof. There can be no compromises. Uber is a company that understands this very well, as it recently beefed-up its security brain-power by hiring two people who've proven that all of the technology lacing our vehicles could prove to be a serious detriment if it's insecure. It's a good thing that autonomous vehicles haven't littered the market quite yet, as it's clear that there is still much work to be done. Thanks to Jonathan Petit, Principal Scientist... Read more...
Give credit to the Raspberry Pi Foundation for helping to popularize the tiny and affordable PC movement that has makers and programmers of all skill levels tinkering with do-it-yourself projects. Millions of boards later, others have jumped into the category, including CHIP, the world's first $9 computer and one that could give Raspberry Pi a run for its money. In response, the price of a previous generation Raspberry Pi Model B+ has been cut to $25. That's a $10 price cut compared to its original $35 price tag. It's a long overdue one. Officially, the Raspberry Pi Foundation says that production optimizations have made the Raspberry Pi Model B+ cheaper to produce, hence the price cut, though... Read more...
Many wonderful things can be and have been said about the Raspberry Pi — it's adroitness as a programming learning tool, its remarkably low cost-of-entry, the strong and varied community that has developed around it, the user creativity it inspires, its oh-so-oh-so-cool factor — but one thing never said is that it provides a clean, well-contained user computing experience. That's because, well, it doesn't. The truth is that the typical Raspberry Pi system is precisely the opposite, presenting as a chaotic jumble of cables, cords, wires, USB hubs, peripheral devices, and various power supplies. It is still marvelously useful, though, and provides a ton of techy fun for boys... Read more...
Where DIY PC boards are concerned, Raspberry Pi was an undeniable spearhead. As soon as the original unit came out, a flurry of competitors came to the surface, each with their own little twist. That's great for the consumer, but not great for RPi, which persisted for a couple of years without releasing a substantial update. Well, with the just-released RPi 2, we're brought back up to speed (no pun), and there's more than one reason to get excited: RPi 2 isn't just faster, it also brings Windows 10 support. Oh - and because of the class of device this is, a copy of Windows 10 will be free. On the hardware side, the biggest boosts to this second-gen RPi include the CPU and RAM. The CPU gets a... Read more...
Two years ago saw the release of the Raspberry Pi Model B, a $35 computer board running Linux, and in the meantime we’ve also seen the $25 Model A emerge. Now the Raspberry Pi Model B+ is here, and the team is calling it “the final evolution of the original Rasperry Pi”. Although the B+ has the same ARM-based BCM2835 processor, 512MB RAM, and $35 price tag as the Model B, there are several key improvements, including two additional USB 2.0 ports (for a total of 4 four), a slicker push-push microSD slot that replaces the old friction-fit slot, and a 40-pin GPIO header that replaces the old 26-pin setup. Raspberry Pi Model B+ There’s also a dedicated low-noise power supply... Read more...
An enterprising tinkerer named David Hunt built a “smartphone” from a Raspberry Pi and off-the-shelf parts. Appropriately, he named the contraption the PiPhone, and it actually functions. Hunt used an Adafruit touchscreen as a display and popped in a SIM900 GSM/GPRS module to enable phone calls, send texts, and use data. There’s a 2500mAh LiPo battery and a DC-DC boost converter as well as a few cables, connectors, and switches, too. Yes, the PiPhone is hideous (someone please 3D print a case for this thing), and yes, you can acquire a much better phone from any provider for less than the $158 Hunt spent on parts, but there’s something delightful about seeing someone figure... Read more...
We love a good mod around here, and this one is priceless: Using a Rasperry Pi, a pair of hacked-up video glasses, a tiny wireless keyboard, and some 3D-printed parts, you can create your own Google Glass-like spectacles that will mount on virtually any sunglasses or prescription frames. Basically, you can pull apart the video glasses and extract some key components and then fit them into some 3D-printed pieces, the designs for which are free from Thingiverse. Poof, there are your high-tech specs. To power them--and this is the ungraceful part--you need to put together a pocket-sized Raspberry Pi system and, well, put it in your pocket. Then you connect the Rasperry Pi to the spectacles with... Read more...
The adorably awesome $35 Raspberry Pi has proven to be a fun, flexible, and relatively powerful tool for hackers, tinkerers, and makers, but the platform has been lacking a modern web browser. That’s changing, as the Raspberry Pi team, in collaboration with Collabora, have developed an “up-to-date”, HTML5-capable web browser. The idea is that it’s a port of Web (the web browser formerly known as Epiphany), and it will offer multi-tab features, ARMv6-optimized 2D rendering, and accelerated image and HTML5 video decoding. Collectively, the teams have already finished the porting process and are hard at work on the memory footprint optimizations, which will enable the use... Read more...
The Raspberry Pi can be used for all sorts of applications, including sweet mini desktop builds, and it can also be used as a personal cloud server with arkOS. The arkOS project has been crowdsourcing funds, and it has already pushed past its $45,000 goal with 5 days to go in the campaign. The open source arkOS platform, simply put, is designed to let you easily host your own websites, email, web-based apps, and personal cloud. There’s a GUI interface called Genesis that should make setting up, configuring, and managing everything fairly simple, so you don’t have to be familiar with command lines to use it. Raspberry Pi Model B It sounds a bit like the WD My Cloud personal cloud server... Read more...
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