Items tagged with Raspberry-Pi

Although Intel is Chipzilla, the company can’t help but extend its reach just a bit into the exciting and growing world of DIY makers and hobbyists. Intel announced its Galileo development board, a microcontroller that’s compatible with Arduino software and uses the new Quark X1000 SoC processor (400MHz, 32-bit, Pentium-class, single- core and thread) that Intel announced at the IDF 2013 keynote. The board makes use of Intel’s architecture to make it easy to develop for Windows, Mac, and Linux, but it’s also completely open hardware. If this sounds similar to the low-cost Raspberry Pi board, that’s because they’re definitely of the same ilk. Galileo is just... Read more...
Anything that helps those of all ages learn a new skill without spending a lot of cash is great; anything that helps people learn a skill such as coding is extraordinary. Such is Coder, a project developed by a small group of Googlers that offers a simple way to turn a Raspberry Pi into a little web server and also build apps on it, within a browser. Coder relies on standard languages such as HTML, CSS, and Javascript and lets users “build real web stuff”. It’s an open source project, so it’s totally free, and all you need to get going is a Raspberry Pi, power supply, 4GB or larger SD card, and a Raspberry Pi WiFi module (if you like). Altogether, that’s... Read more...
Intel’s Open Source Technology Center, in conjunction with CircuitCo, is developing a low-cost, embedded-type motherboard based on the Intel Atom processor called the MinnowBoard. The whole affair is very charming (complete with a cartoon minnow logo), and it’s being marketed as a sort of fun, hobbyist-friendly board. (Sound like the Raspberry Pi?) Although it uses Intel architecture, the hardware is open, and it runs the open source Angstrom Linux distro. Specs include an Intel Atom E640 (dual-core, 1GHz) with an Intel integrated Intel Graphics Media Accelerator GMA 600, 1GB DDR2 RAM, and UEFI firmware with 4MB SPI flash. There’s plenty of I/O, too, including DVI... Read more...
What’s a fellow to do when the campus Beowulf cluster isn’t quite ideal for his Electrical and Computer Engineering dissertation project? Build one of his own, of course. Boise State’s Joshua Kiepert did just that, and he used 32 Raspberry Pi boards to do it. Kiepert’s dissertation is focused on “developing a novel data sharing system for wireless sensor networks to facilitate in-network collaborative processing of sensor data”, and his testing method required a distributed simulation over a LAN, and the Beowulf cluster in Boise State’s “MetaGeek Lab”, aka the Onyx lab, seemed ideal for the task. The Onyx cluster sports 32 nodes, each of which... Read more...
So far, the tiny and inexpensive Raspberry Pi computer has been about as successful as anyone could have hoped for. More than a million units have been sold so far, there’s a dedicated app store, and hobbyists and developers have been making and porting games and the like. The latest fun consists of a DOS emulator for the Raspberry Pi that enables you to play older PC games such as Duke Nukem 3D, Doom, Little Big Adventure, and more. Coder Patrick Alto based the emulator on one he built for the Nintendo DS, and the latest release offers fixes including better support for USB devices such as keyboards and two-button mice. He further says that the current status of the build is as follows:... Read more...
Oh Raspberry Pi, is there no end to the fun and creative projects of which you are a part? The latest nifty implementation of the tiny $35 Linux computer is a mobile Raspberry Pi machine called the Pi-to-Go. The brainchild of a fellow named Nathan Morgan, who dug into his nearby stack of Dell laptop parts for the battery he used to make the computer. Morgan, in true open source fashion, is making his project’s schematics and step-by-step instructions available to anyone who would deign to attempt the same thing. He was resourceful in finding components. For example, his LCD is actually an after market camera used to help cars back up safely, and he bought a simple tiny wireless keyboard... Read more...
The initial fervor over the Raspberry Pi Linux PC has perhaps faded a bit, but that’s fine because the thing has been available long enough for master tinkerers such as Adafruit Technologies to do terrific things with it. Adafruit has actually developed its own Linux distro for Raspberry Pi called “Occidentalis v0.1” (a play on “Rubus occidentalis”, the Latin term for “black raspberry”), which is geared for optimum hackability. The Adafruit gang loves the Raspberry Pi but felt that the latest distro from the latter (Raspian Wheezy) lacked enough features; instead of throwing the baby out with the bathwater, Adafruit took the good work done in Wheezy and... Read more...
Price-wise, HardKernel’s ODROID-X Development Board ($129) doesn’t hold a candle to the like of Raspberry Pi ($35), but it packs some tasty features that tinkers will love to play with. The ARM-based platform is built around a quad-core Samsung Exynos 4412 Cortex-A9 (1.4GHz) processor and has Mali-400 quad core graphics, 1GB of LP-DDR2 RAM, and Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich (although users can slap Ubuntu on there, too). In terms of I/O, the ODROID-X has a micro HDMI connector, RGB-24bit LCD interface port, headphone and mic jacks, six USB 2.0 ports, 10/100 Ethernet LAN port, a full-size SDHC card slot, and more. Although the specs are compelling enough, the accessories that you... Read more...
First off, yes, there are emulators that can run all those classic Atari, NES, SNES, and Sega games, but it’s far more rare to find a small computer that’s been modified to be a console that lets you play those games with an actual system controller. The fellow that writes the petRockBlog decided to do just that when he modded his tiny Raspberry Pi PC to run SNES games. After choosing a stable Linux distribution and emulator to work from, he wrote a script for a launch menu, but he got really creative when it came to making an authentic retro input method. Rather than simply converting a controller to USB, he built an adapter board that allow the user to connect a pair of SNES controller... Read more...
The whole $25 Raspberry Pi Linux computer thing has been fun to follow, despite the delivery delays and occasional hardware whoopsie. One of the headaches some users have apparently been experiencing is that they’ve had to reinstall the firmware after working with the Raspberry Pi images. A dev named Hexxeh got so tired of having to do this that he made his own firmware update tool to do it for him called rpi-updater. Because he’s a good open sourcer, Hexxeh has made the tool freely available to all users, and despite his disclaimer that rpi-updater is “rather experimental”, the Raspberry Pi folks think highly enough about it to link to the tool on their own website. You... Read more...
Well, it can’t be all gumdrops and rainbows; the folks behind the tiny $25 Raspberry Pi Linux-based computer, a trendy item in tech circles that saw demand immediately outpace supply when it went up for preorder, announced that due to a small manufacturing problem, the first wave of Raspberry Pis will be delayed. According to a company blog entry, the issue was due to “a hardware parts substitution that was made in the factory by accident: specifically, where we’d specified jacks with integrated magnetics in the BOM and schematics, the factory soldered in non-magnetic jacks.” One of these is not like the other, which was the problem Without the magnetic jacks, there could... Read more...
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