Items tagged with ios

Bugs seem to be a common occurrence when it comes to iOS and macOS these days. That became even more apparent this week after Italian bloggers discovered that you can crash iOS devices (i.e. iPhones and iPads) with a single text message. The bug is actually quite easy to pull off, and involves sending an Indian language (Telugu) character to an iPhone. Once the person receives the text, the iOS Springboard crashes. After that point, the Messages apps can no longer be opened, as it will continually crash while it attempts to load the "offending" character. The only way to break out of the crash... Read more...
Apple is on the path to finding "Peace," the internal name of iOS 12 due out this fall. Typically Apple goes all out for its annual software upgrades and crams as many new features and upgrades into its mobile operating system as possible, and then tweaks things throughout the year with incremental updates. This time around, however, Apple is taking a different approach that will see its engineers focus less on new features and more on under-the-hood refinements. That is not to say there will not be any new features for iPhone and iPad users to look forward to. There will be, including a new Digital... Read more...
Apple keeps an ultra tight grip on iOS and is not keen on sharing its proprietary code. Even so, the company's iBoot source code for iOS 9 was recently leaked to the web, and even though Apple's mobile devices now run on iOS 11, it is very likely that some of the same code has been carried over. At least one security researcher called this the biggest leak in iPhone history, which begs the question, how could something like this happen? The answer may have something to do with peer pressure. The leak apparently traces back to a former low level Apple employee who worked at the company's headquarters... Read more...
Apple is not happy at all today with some of its critical source code having been posted online for the world to see. Source code for iBoot, one of the key components in iOS that runs iPhones and iPads, was posted on GitHub. The leak of such proprietary and confidential software could make it easier for hackers to find and exploit flaws in the operating system. The leak could also make it easier for security researchers to find and report flaws to Apple. Apple, like many major companies, has a bug bounty program and for anyone who finds a fault in the boot process, the payout could be as much as... Read more...
Apple is still trying to dig itself out of trouble over performance throttling of iPhones that have degrading batteries. Apple maintains that it throttles performance to prevent iPhones from shutting down unexpectedly. iPhone users were angry because Apple performed these actions without offering any indication that the throttling was happening. Apple first admitted that it was throttling devices back in December. As part of its penance for the throttling, Cupertino has reduced the cost of a battery replacement down to $29. Apple is also facing a U.S. House inquiry over the throttling of devices.... Read more...
With iOS 11.3 beta now out for people to dig around in, there are folks doing just that, looking for what Apple has in store for the future. One of the things that has been discovered, while digging around inside the beta OS, is evidence that Apple is working on a single sign-on service for the web. This was evidenced by the discovery of something called "SecureChannel." The indication with that discovery is that Apple is working on a solution that will let users log into various websites using their Apple ID. Think something along the lines of logging into various websites using your Facebook... Read more...
After blocking an app in the App Store that was designed to alert iOS users of net neutrality violations, Apple took a second look at the application, called Wehe, and decided it was acceptable after all. However, the developer of the app, Dave Choffnes, is still unclear on why exactly Apple chose to banish Wehe from the App Store, which underscores the mysteries of Apple's review process. There are guidelines that spell things out, of course, but even when all the check boxes appear to be ticked, Apple can still decide to refuse an app entrance into its lucrative App Store. That is what happened... Read more...
Apple has faced a number of embarrassing security mishaps over the past few months, with most of them affecting macOS. However, iOS is not immune to annoying glitches as witnessed by the latest chaiOS bug. Software developer Abraham Masri first discovered the exploit, which affects iOS devices, and can cause them to freeze, respring or reboot. The exploit is made possible by the fact that the Messages app in iOS preloads website links, which allows the app to show users a preview. However, this has the unwelcome side effect of executing code that could otherwise be harmful to the operating system.... Read more...
Apple created quite the firestorm when it was revealed that the company was throttling the performance of iPhones with older and "well worn" batteries. The company wasn't upfront about the practice, and it only came to light due to some sleuth work by customers and app developers. Now, Apple CEO Tim Cook says that customers will be given the choice to disable processor throttling in a future iOS update. At first, Cook tried to explain the reasoning behind throttling in the first place, telling ABC News' Rebecca Jarvis in an interview: And so you can imagine if you’re making an emergency call... Read more...
Late last week, Apple confirmed that its iOS-based iPhones and iPads along with its Mac computers are vulnerable to the Meltdown and Spectre exploits (which we have covered in great detail over the past week). At the time, Apple confirmed that it silently introduced “mitigations” in previous updates to iOS, macOS and tvOS to help better defend against the Meltdown vulnerability. "In the coming days we plan to release mitigations in Safari to help defend against Spectre," said Apple on Friday. "We continue to develop and test further mitigations for these issues and will release them... Read more...
Unless you perform high level calculations on an abacus, chances are high that yes, you are affected by the recently disclosed Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities. Between the two, practically every modern processor is vulnerable, including Intel CPUs dating back more than a decade, along with AMD and ARM chips. And yes, if you are entrenched in the Apple ecosystem, you too are affected by all this. But don't just take our word for it—in case there remains any question, Apple confirmed that its platforms are not immune. "Security researchers have recently uncovered security issues known... Read more...
In what will be a boost to iOS developers (and a blow to some Android devs), Apple has gone out and acquired Buddybuild, a Canadian startup that makes tools for app developers. In a couple of months, Apple will discontinue to tools for Android, making Buddybuild exclusive to iOS developers, Buddybuild said in a blog post announcing the migration to Apple. That will go into effect on March 1, 2018. "We're excited to share that the Buddybuild team has joined the Xcode engineering group at Apple to build amazing developer tools for the entire iOS community. We've always been proud to be a Canadian... Read more...
It has been a rough few weeks for Apple with regards to its major software platforms. The latest black mark against the company comes in the form of a zero-day vulnerability that was discovered in Apple's HomeKit implantation in iOS 11.2. The vulnerability was first brought to public light by 9to5Mac, and is reportedly highly difficult to reproduce. Nonetheless, it allows for an unauthorized user to gain control of smart home devices connects via HomeKit. Given that the connected-accessories that are compatible with HomeKit extend to security cameras, smart locks, garage door openers and thermostats,... Read more...
This has been an incredibly dreadful week for Apple's operating systems. It's not often that we such glaring security issues prop up from the Apple camp, but the folks in Cupertino really screwed the pooch -- so to speak -- when it comes to macOS High Sierra. As we reported on Wednesday, developer Lemi Ergin discovered a massive security vulnerability in macOS High Sierra that would allow anyone with direct physical (or remote access) to a Mac to bypass administrator authentication and login without even supplying a password. The steps needed to successfully take advantage of this vulnerability... Read more...
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