Items tagged with SSD

Is your motherboard's NVMe slot pining for a partner? Now is a good time to play storage matchmaker, because there are some tantalizing Cyber Monday deals on high-speed solid state drives out there. As in, savings of up to 50% off MSRP. While the discounts over actual street pricing are not quite as deep, there are still some exceptional bargains out there. For example, Corsair's Force Series MP600 1TB SSD is on sale for $124.99 at Amazon (save $125 over MSRP). This is the lowest price it has ever been. Looking at its price history on Amazon, the same drive was selling for around $190 to $200 just six months ago and has been coming down in price ever since. More recently, it was selling for around... Read more...
Kioxia has begun shipping a new line of solid state drives for the enterprise market (separate from its recently introduced CD7 line), the EM6 series, though these are unique from past offerings in the segment. These are NVMe-oF (Non-Volatile Memory Express over Fabrics) drives for Ethernet Bunch of Flash (EBOF) systems, which in plain speak means they leverage an Ethernet interface that makes scaling data center storage capacity potentially easier and more cost effective. The key ingredient here is Marvell's 88SN2400 NVMe-oF SSD converter hardware. What that does is convert an NVMe SSD into a single or dual-ported 25-gigabit (Gb) NVMe-oF SSD, allowing data centers to effectively share storage... Read more...
The folks at TeamGroup just ripped out one of the fastest solid state drives on the market, based on the rated specifications. TeamGroup's new T-Force Cardea A440 Pro hitches a ride on the PCI Express 4.0 bus to deliver sequential read speeds of up to 7,400MB/s (or 7.4GB/s), and sequential write speeds of up to 7,000MB/s (7GB/s). Drive makers are now flirting with saturating the PCIe Gen 4 bus. The Gen 4 specification supports around 2GB/s per lane, for a total of 32GB/s when utilizing all 16 lanes (x16). Today's high-speed SSDs in the M.2 form factor feature an NVMe x4 interface, so the theoretical upper limit is around 8GB/s (or 8,000MB/s). That's before any overhead, of course. There's more... Read more...
If you're looking to upgrade your PlayStation 5 with a fast SSD, Samsung's 980 Pro SSD is a suitable candidate. Even more so at the end of the month. That's because Samsung today announced it is equipping its speedy 980 Pro with a heastink that is specifically designed to fit inside the relatively tight confines of Sony's PS5 game console. "Ready for installation in a slim, PS5-compatible design, the 980 Pro with Heatsink enables gamers to easily expand storage on their console. This addition to the Samsung 980 Pro SSD family is delivered with a proprietary built-in heatsink with Samsung Advanced Heat Dissipation Technology," Samsung says. One of the perks of the PS5 is that Sony incorporated... Read more...
Western Digital this week pulled the wraps off the latest entry in its entry-level PCIe SSD family with the WD Blue SN570. As you might have already surmised from its naming, the WD Blue SN570 is the successor to the existing WD Blue SN550 lineup. To hit lower price points, the WD Blue SN570 SSDs feature a DRAM-less design and use the PCIe 3.0 interface (instead of the newer PCIe 4.0 interface used by the WD_Black family). Western Digital hasn’t provided any details on the controller used in the new SSDs, but it is paired with BiCS 5 3D TLC NAND flash. Given the PCIe 3.0 x4 interface, you won’t reach lofty 7,000 MB/sec read speeds like the WD_Black SN850. Instead, sequential reads... Read more...
A few weeks back, we brought you the news that a cheaper, 512GB version of the Seagate Storage Expansion Card for the Xbox Series S and Series S is on the way. The initial tip came from a product listing at a French retailer, which priced the expansion card at 154,99€, or around $180. Today, we have further confirmation that the smaller and cheaper SKU is coming courtesy of Window Central. The publication says that a source provided an image of the retail shelf placard for the 512GB Seagate Storage Expansion Card. Unfortunately, the anonymous tipster didn't say which U.S. retailer spilled the beans on the new accessory. Still, we'd imagine that it will show up at the usual suspects like... Read more...
Although it may seem hard to believe, we've experienced the performance blessings of PCIe 4.0-based SSDs for over two years. Performance has ramped to the point that we've currently seeing sequential write and read speeds that are twice their PCIe 3.0-based predecessors. For example, the T-Force Cardea A440 Pro Special Series can hit sequential read/write speeds of 7,400 MB/sec and 7,000 MB/sec, respectively. Now, Kioxia is giving us an early taste of what to expect with next-generation PCIe 5.0-based SSDs. Today's fastest SSDs are coming close to saturating the available bandwidth provided by a PCIe 4.0 x4 interface (8 GB/sec). With PCIe 5.0, the maximum available bandwidth with a PCIe 5.0 x4... Read more...
Sony launched its first-ever beta software program for the PlayStation 5 in June, which was the Japanese gaming giant's counter to Microsoft's Xbox Insider Program. The first fruit from that beta program came in late July when Sony enabled the M.2 PCIe 4.0 expansion slot inside the console, allowing users to install a compatible SSD. Tomorrow, the PlayStation September System Software Update brings SSD expansion to all PS5 owners, not just beta testers. Third-party SSDs can be installed in the PS5 or PS5 Digital Edition, and they must achieve minimum sequential read speeds of 5,500 MB/sec. Sony also highly recommends that users purchase an SSD equipped with a standard heatsink or install a third-party... Read more...
We're always on the lookout for hot new SSDs here at Hot Hardware, and the folks at TeamGroup just announced two new product families that might be interesting to two types of users: those looking for value-priced PCIe 4.0 SSDs, and those that want a speedy external SSD solution. Starting things off is the T-Force Cardea Z44L, a PCIe 4.0 SSD aimed at gaming enthusiasts. Like many of the T-Force SSDs launched over the past few months, the Z44L uses a super-thin graphene heatsink which can improve heat dissipation by up to 9 percent compared to the same SSD without a heatsink. Although the Cardea Z44L uses the PCIe 4.0 interface, its maximum sequential read and write speeds are more in line with... Read more...
The race to build the fastest PCIe 4.0 SSDs for the PC market rages on, with key players like Samsung, TeamGroup, and Corsair pushing the envelope on a seemingly weekly basis. Corsair is the latest to strike with its MP600 PRO XT. The MP600 PRO XT brings attention to itself for a rather beefy (and stealthy) heatsink mounted to the PCB. Corsair says that the reason for this is to more efficiently dissipate heat, which helps to deliver sustained high performance without throttling. However, if you want to go over the top with cooling, Corsair says that the MP600 PRO XT is compatible with its Hydro X Series XM2 Water Block. Going this route will allow you to integrate the SSD with a custom cooling... Read more...
Drive makers have gotten into the unfortunate habit of swapping out key components that can potentially affect the performance of any particular solid state drive model, which introduces a sort of luck-of-the-draw factor for the buyer. Western Digital recently did this with its value-oriented Blue SN550 NVMe SSD. After catching some heat, WD has promised to update the drive model whenever it does something similar in the future. As we noted in our WD Blue SN550 review, it is a superb option in the budget NVMe SSD sector. The drives are rated to reach 2,400MB/s of sequential read performance and 1,950MB/s of sequential write performance, both of which run circles around what you can get on the... Read more...
If you were able to get into Sony's beta software program for the PlayStation 5, you can now install your own SSD to expand storage. The PlayStation 5, by default, comes with an 825GB SSD installed, but that can fill up quickly when installing loads of AAA games. Requirements To Add A PCIe 4.0 SSD To A PlayStation 5 First and foremost, you'll need a reasonably fast PCIe 4.0 M.2 NVMe SSD to get started; Sony requires minimum sequential read speeds of 5,500 MB/sec. It should also be noted that Sony requires that you install a heatsink on the SSD -- if one isn't already installed -- to ensure that it doesn't overheat within the PlayStation 5's chassis. Remember that the heatsink cannot exceed... Read more...
Late last week, Sony released long-awaited beta software that allows PlayStation 5 gamers to take advantage of the empty M.2 slot in their consoles to expand storage with an off-the-shelf PCI 4.0 SSD. The PlayStation 5 comes standard with a non-replaceable 825GB SSD, but it can quickly fill up with games, making further expansion a necessity as more high-profile games come to market. Now that more PlayStation 5 users are installing the beta software, they're sharing their experience on how performance is shaping up compared to the default SSD. One such user is Redditor DanCTapirson, who decided to test Samsung's impressive 980 Pro PCIe 4.0 SSD. The 980 Pro is rated for up to 7,000 MB/sec sequential... Read more...
It seems like just yesterday when we first basked in the glory of PCIe 4.0 SSDs. But in actuality, we've experienced 5,000+ MB/sec sequential read and write speeds for the past two years. PCIe 4.0 was first enabled for consumer PC platforms with AMD Zen 2/X570 in mid-2019 and SSDs have only gotten faster in the years since. Today, the fastest PCIe 4.0 SSDs can achieve sequential read speeds above 7GB/sec. With Intel's Alder Lake platform fast approaching, all eyes are turning to the next-generation PCIe 5.0 interface and the speed benefits that it will bring. TrendForce indicates that the first PCIe 5.0 SSDs will emerge in 2022, which should kick off another massive leap in storage performance.... Read more...
One of the best features of Sony's PlayStation 5 is the ability to upgrade the console's internal storage via an empty M.2 PCIe 4.0 slot. Unlike the Xbox Series X, which uses a proprietary port for expanding storage, the PlayStation 5 can use off-the-shelf SSDs if they meet Sony's minimum performance requirements. The only problem up until today is that Sony hadn't yet enabled the feature. But now, there's a new beta BIOS available to customers, which allows them to plug in their own SSDs to expand beyond the standard 825GB SSD that comes with the console. To gain access to PlayStation 5 System Software Beta, we suggest that you check out this previous article. Once you are enrolled, you'll want... Read more...
Though cryptocurrency has drawn some ire worldwide, there is some serious market potential, and it would be foolish for tech companies to ignore potential financial gains. Take, for example, a cryptocurrency called Chia, which utilizes unused storage as part of a proof of space and time blockchain. The faster, the better, so SSDs were selling out incredibly quickly overseas. Now, it seems PNY is playing to the crowd and is launching a Chia-optimized SSD. As mentioned, Chia is a proof of space and time cryptocurrency, which relies on unused storage on drives to be used for “plotting.” Plotting is a write-intensive process that records hashes which are then compared to a challenge broadcast... Read more...
Imagine paying a premium for a blazing fast PCI Express 4.0 solid state drive only to discover that it coughs up a hairball on your specific PC platform. Sour grapes, right? Well, that is the situation some owners of X570 motherboards found themselves in when slapping a WD Black SN850 SSD into their PC, but fortunately there is now a fix available. Let's back up a moment. The issue garnered attention last month when users noticed a precipitous drop in write performance—over 43 percent, according to some online benchmark data. To be fair, this decline in write performance did not make the SSD slow (it was still hitting speeds of around 3,000MB/s), just slower than it should have been (it's... Read more...
Intel has been making noise in virtually all segments of the storage market as of late. A few weeks back, we took a look at the Optane Memory H20, which combines 3DXpoint media with traditional NAND on hybrid M.2 device to accelerate the storage subsystem in mainstream notebooks and PCs. More recently, we evaluated the blazing-fast, ultra-pricey Optane SSD P5800X for high-performance workstations, and we can't forget about the budget friendly SSD 670p that arrived in early March. Today, we’ll shift our focus to the enterprise space and inspect Intel’s recently-announced PCIe Gen 4 SSD D7-P5510 series, which targets data center applications with high-capacities, and enhanced throughput... Read more...
When we reviewed the Intel Optane SSD 905P back in 2018, despite a significant price premium over NAND-based SSDs, we gave the drive and Editor’s Choice award due to its exceptional performance where it mattered most for consumers, e.g. access times and random transfers at low queue depths. Intel Optane solid state drives typically offer much better latency characteristics, more consistent and predicable performance with a variety of workloads -- regardless of how much drive capacity is being used – and their endurance ratings are off the charts. The only caveats with the 905P were pricing, and sequential performance that wasn’t quite as high as the top-end NAND-based SSDs of... Read more...
This morning Kingston announced that its latest DC1500M series of enterprise-class solid state drives have begun shipping. Like many of its predecessors in Kingston’s enterprise SSD line-up, the new DC1500M series leverages a hot-pluggable U.2 (2.5”, 15mm) form factor, that’s compatible with common U.2 backplanes. The drives are tuned for mixed-use case, data-intensive workloads, including cloud computing, web hosting, high-performance computing (HPC), virtual infrastructures, and AI and deep learning applications. There are four drives in the initial Kingston DC1500M SSD line-up, starting with a 960GB model and maxing out with a beefy 7.68TB behemoth. We’ve got a 1.92TB... Read more...
When the limits of the PCIe 3.0 interface started holding back high-performance SSDs, the industry made the logical leap to PCIe 4.0. With that change came the arrival of the first SSDs with 5,000MB/sec sequential reads and similar writes. As SSD controller technology has matured and faster NAND has been introduced over the past two years, we’re now surpassing 7,000MB/sec reads, as witnessed by the new FireCuda 530 launched this week by Seagate. Seagate says that the FireCuda 530 is its fastest client SSD to date, and the company isn’t kidding. The SSD uses Phison’s 8-channel PS5018-E18 controller along with 3D TLC NAND. The result is that the FireCuda 530 can deliver sequential... Read more...
The PCI Express 4.0 interface has been around on AMD's Ryzen platform for a long time now, ever since the launch of Zen 2 and the X570 chipset. The new spec has finally gone mainstream on Intel's platforms, as well, with the release of the Rocket Lake-S 11th Gen Core processor family and the accompanying Z590 PCH. That means that neither camp is restricted to the older 3.0 spec which has half the bandwidth of the newer PCIe interface. It's high time we saw PCIe 4 solid state drives go mainstream, and today we have another offering on tap as a result with TEAMGROUP's T-Force Cardea Zero Z440 M.2 SSD. As we hinted above, this drive rides the latest PCI Express bus for the most potential bandwidth... Read more...
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