Items tagged with Research

Security breaches and data loss have been rampant problems for companies in recent years, with it seeming like there was a new victim every week. These security issues have also had some dire consequences, such as the first possible ransomware-related death at a hospital. As such, organizations are facing a harsh reality, with decisions that could make or break them. Technology research company Canalys released its analysis of cybersecurity incidents today, and it dropped a bombshell in that “more records were compromised in just 12 months than in the previous 15 years combined.” Companies, on average, had an approximated 61 million records lost, with a loss from public sources totaling... Read more...
Deepfakes are beginning to grow in popularity and quality, such as the recent Tom Cruise deepfakes posted to TikTok. Deepfakes raise concerns over what is and isn't real when it comes to various media formats. Subsequently, researchers at the University of Buffalo have developed an AI system that can detect whether an image is real or not with some clever tricks. One of the most popular ways of generating human faces is using a generative adversary network (GAN) model. As the researcher's paper explains, these models can "synthesize highly realistic human faces that are difficult to discern from real ones visually." In fact, the images you see above are what the researchers used, and they came... Read more...
Over the last nearly two weeks, we have seen Microsoft deploying emergency patches and telling companies to secure Exchange servers due to Chinese hackers exploiting a 0-day vulnerability. When vulnerabilities such as this are published, security researchers and hackers alike jump on the opportunity to develop proof-of-concept code and working exploits. Microsoft is not a fan of this, though, as it has removed a proof-of-concept from its code-repository site, GitHub. As the situation has developed, security researchers have delved into the Microsoft Exchange problem to replicate other hackers' work and complete research on what happened. One of these researchers, Nguyen Jang, posted their proof-of-concept... Read more...
Somewhere between Babe and Elon Musk’s Neuralink experiments are pigs playing video games for science. Though it may sound bizarre, researchers Candace Croney and Sarah Boysen wanted to better understand the cognitive ability of pigs, through training and manipulating a joystick-operated video game task. This training and subsequent research has since led to some interesting results. Over the years, it has been found that pigs are relatively smart animals, and it has become something of common knowledge. While the humane treatment of farm animals in an effort to gauge intelligence may raise ethical concerns, this new research is simply interesting to dig into. For the experiment, the subjects... Read more...
Over the years, several studies have linked violent video games to violent behaviors in real life. However, those studies have been a pain in the side of ordinary people who understand the studies are a bunch of hogwash. A new ten-year-long study has come out, explaining that violent video games do not cause kids to become violent adults. Boom, headshot! Since 2011 and perhaps even earlier, Sarah M. Coyne and Laura Stockdale studied the effects of violent video games on adolescents. Their research has now been published in the Journal of Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. The journal article explains that the researchers used a “person-centered approach” to the research,... Read more...
A few weeks ago, Azure received an NVIDIA A100 upgrade to its virtual machines. Announced at GTC, NVIDIA is now building its supercomputer with the A100 platform across the pond. This behemoth, dubbed Cambridge-1, will be the most powerful supercomputer operating within the United Kingdom. It will become available to U.K healthcare researchers using AI to solve complex issues, such as COVID-19, by the end of the year. The Cambridge-1 supercomputer will be an NVIDIA DGX SuperPOD supercomputer with over 400 petaflops of AI performance and eight petaflops of Linpack performance. This sort of horsepower would allow it to rank 29th on the TOP500 list of most powerful supercomputers in the world. Inside,... Read more...
The concept of Time travel often comes up in a multitude of pop culture references, and it gets rather confusing with all the interpretations. If you begin to think about it, paradoxes and loopholes plague our understanding of how it all should work too. After all, it's science fiction is it not?  Based on the math of a University of Queensland Australia undergrad, though, “Paradox-free time travel is theoretically possible,” so suck it pop culture. Could sci-fi again someday become reality? A fourth-year Bachelor of Advanced Science student, Gemain Tobar, decided to investigate the possibilities of time travel under the guidance of University of Queensland physicist... Read more...
Star Wars fans are likely familiar with the scene where Luke Skywalker receives a new hand. Luke twitches his hand as he responds to being poked by a robot. This kind of technology is no longer only attainable in fantasy or science fiction. Researchers at RMIT University have created new electronic skin that replicates the way human skin feels pain. According to lead researcher Dr. Madhu Bhaskaran, “We’re sensing things all the time through the skin but our pain response only kicks in at a certain point, like when we touch something too hot or too sharp.” Previous technologies were unable to mimic what human skin typically does when it feels pain from temperature or pressure... Read more...
As the coronavirus pandemic continues around the world, everyone's lives have changed. The way we work and learn is significantly different now than it was only a few months ago as people shelter in place, and offices and schools around the globe have been forced to move to a distance model. Teaching from home has forced educational institutions everywhere to quickly move to online learning and to implement new systems to support the shift. Security researchers at Check Point Research decided to audit the security of several of the most popular Learning Management Systems (LMS) that are being used to deliver remote education for people of all ages. The researchers say that most independent websites... Read more...
A group of scientists has been working to create a machine able to take the activity in the human brain, feed it into a computer system, and output sentences that are recognizable. The team says that they have trained algorithms to be able to transfer brain patterns into sentences in real-time with a word error rate as low as three percent. According to the team working on the project, earlier efforts in the area were only able to decode fragments of spoken words or a small percentages of words contained in particular phrases. The project was conducted by researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, using a quartet of volunteers who read sentences aloud while electrodes recorded... Read more...
Scientists at the University of Bristol and the Technical University of Denmark have made an incredible breakthrough discovery. Researchers for the institutions have achieved quantum teleportation between two computer chips for the first time. They were able to send information from one chip to another, instantly, without the chips being physically or electronically connected. The scientists say that the breakthrough opens the door for quantum computers and the quantum internet. The teleportation is possible thanks to a phenomenon called quantum entanglement, where two particles are so entwined that they can communicate over long distances. With quantum entanglement, changing the properties of... Read more...
One of a human baby’s most exciting developmental steps is learning and repeating their first word. However, we still do not fully understand what happens in the brain that helps this learning process takes place. Researchers are now a little closer to understanding speech development, however, and the methods they've employed take a cue from the science fiction movie, Inception. Scientists have actually implanted memories in birds' brains to teach them songs that the birds have previously not heard before. Scientists at the University of Texas Southwestern have been working with cute little zebra finches over the last few years to unlock the mysteries of speech development. Zebra finches... Read more...
Anyone around in the '80s certainly played with a Rubik's Cube at some point. And many of those people probably ended up peeling stickers off to solve the infuriating puzzle. Researchers from the University of California-Irvine have created an AI system that is able to solve the Rubik's Cube in just over a second; it's called DeepCubeA. The scientists say that the AI system can solve the puzzle without any in-game coaching from humans or specific domain knowledge. In some circles, the Rubik's Cube is still a big deal, in 2015 a teen set a world record for solving a Rubik's Cube in 5.25 seconds. The AI system can solve the puzzle cube in a fraction of that time. Study senior author, Pierre Baldi,... Read more...
Update - 3:44PM ET 6/21/19: This article has been updated to reflect skepticism of the claims made by researchers and any direct causation with the symptom of bone spurs in the subjects of the study. Some recent biomechanics research suggests that young people are developing horn-like spikes at the back of their skulls due to excessive mobile phone use. These bone spurs are reportedly caused by the forward tilt of the head, which shifts the weight from the spine to the muscles in the back of the head. That tilt is reportedly causing bone growth in the connecting tendons and ligaments. The scientists involved in the study claim that the weight transfer that causes the build-up is comparative to... Read more...
Before the advent of smartphones and tablets, using the bathroom meant getting cozy with a paper magazine, newspaper, or heck even a shampoo bottle to pass the time. Now it's Angry Birds and scrolling through Facebook. It should come as no surprise, then, that your smartphone may be contaminated with fecal matter. As gross as that sounds, a new study for Global Handwashing Day (which is apparently thing) found that one in six smartphones are contaminated in such a manner. "This study provides more evidence that some people still don't wash their hands properly, especially after going to the toilet. I hope the thought of having E. coli on their hands and phones encourages them to take more care... Read more...
Researchers from Radboud University in the Netherlands have announced a flaw that affects some SSDs that feature hardware-based security; the flaw could allow an attacker to completely bypass disk encryption. Bypassing the encryption would give the hackers full access to the local data without having to know the password for the disk. The researchers are clear that the flaw only affects certain SSD models that have hardware-based encryption. SSDs with hardware-based encryption have specific chips inside that handle the task of encrypting and decrypting data. The vulnerabilities that researchers Carlo Meijer and Bernard van Gastel found are in the firmware of the SSDs. The duo says that the... Read more...
Researchers have created a new device for smartphones called MobiLimb; it's a robotic appendage that is used to augment the mobile device. MobiLimb connects to the charge port on the bottom of a smartphone and adds a small finger-like limb with 5-degrees-of-freedom. The team behind MobiLimb believes it can overcome some of the static, passive, and motionless limitations of mobile devices. The robotic limb preserves the device form factor in how it attaches and the I/O capabilities of the device. One important fact about MobiLimb is that it isn’t limited to the common vibration feedback devices already offer; it directly touches the user. MobiLimb can react expressively to a user's actions... Read more...
Engineers and researchers are constantly on the lookout for new ways to find problems inside the human body that allow doctors to determine what's going on internally without having to resort to cutting. A team from the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) led by Professor Dina Katabi is working on a new wireless system that the team likens to an in-body GPS system called ReMix. The system is designed specifically to locate ingestible implants inside the body using a low-power wireless signal from outside the body. MIT Prof. Dina Katabi The idea is that the ReMix wireless system could allow medical personnel to determine the exact location of ingestible implants... Read more...
MIT has created a new AI that we sincerely hope never escapes into the wild because this IS how you get Skynet. This AI is called Norman and it is a psychopath. How did Norman turn into a psycho? All the image data MIT fed Norman came from what it calls "an infamous subreddit" that the researchers refuse to name specifically due to its graphic content. However, the team does say that this subreddit is "dedicated to documenting and observing the disturbing reality of death." The goal with Norman was to prove that when people say that an AI can be biased and unfair, the fault isn't the algorithm but the biased data that the algorithm consumes. When an AI algorithm is trained as Norman was, it sees... Read more...
A group of researchers at the University of Missouri have developed a new battery breakthrough that could have a big impact on runtimes for the gadgets. The researchers have developed new material that can address the two chief complaints of batteries used in electronic devices now: relatively runtimes life and unwanted heat production. The team has applied for a patent for a magnetic material that has a unique honeycomb lattice structure that offers distinct electronical properties. “Semiconductor diodes and amplifiers, which often are made of silicon or germanium, are key elements in modern electronic devices,” said Deepak K. Singh, head researcher on the project, who also serves... Read more...
Researchers from Oregon State University (OSU) have announced that they have created a new material that is a key step in creating the next generation of supercomputers. These next-generation quantum computers will be far faster than current supercomputers while consuming much less energy. The scientists on the project work in the OSU College of Science and the compound they have developed is an inorganic material that adopts a crystal structure. The material is capable of sustaining a new state of matter that is known as quantum spin liquid. That new compound is lithium osmium oxide and it has osmium atoms that form a honeycomb-like lattice, and can enforce a phenomenon called "magnetic... Read more...
MIT is poised to make a massive investment into the future of nuclear fusion power. This move is significant because fusion power is potentially inexhaustible and produces zero carbon emissions. Fusion power could quite literally change the world as we know it today. MIT has announced a new collaboration with a private company called Commonwealth Fusion Systems (CFS) that will see $50 million poured into the creation of a working fusion power plant. MIT and CFS want to perform rapid, staged research that will lead to a new generation of fusion experiments and ultimately power plants based on advancement in high-temperature superconductors. The work will be built on decades of federal government... Read more...
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