Items tagged with ddr5

G.Skill has carved out an enthusiast following for its high-performance memory kits and its efforts within the competitive overclocking community. Not looking to slow things down in the DDR5 era, G.Skill announced several "extreme performance" DDR5 memory kits, culminating in DDR5-6400 with comparatively tight timings (to what we have seen so far). That's relative, of course—part of the trade off with opening up the bandwidth spigot at the DDR5 tap is that the faster transfer rates come at the expense of looser memory timings. Take for example GeIL's recently introduced Polaris RGB Sync memory. At DDR5-4800, timings are set at 40-40-40-77, at 1.1V. The higher you go, the looser things get,... Read more...
Acer will waste no time injecting Intel’s 12th Gen Alder Lake CPUs into its desktop line, starting with its newly unveiled Predator Orion 7000 series PC. Built for high-end gaming, the latest addition to the Predator PC line pairs unlocked and overclockable Alder Lake processors with up to an NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090 graphics card, to tackle high frame rates with the image quality settings cranked to the max. Perhaps the biggest surprise, though, is the somewhat muted aesthetic compared to past Predator desktops. Previous designs have not just been bold, but outlandish and even gaudy, to be quite frank. The Predator Orion 7000, meanwhile, still maintains an overall aggressive profile that... Read more...
Samsung says it has begun mass producing what it claims is the industry's smallest DRAM based on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) technology, on a 14-nanometer process. It had already begun shipping the first EUV DRAM earlier this year (back in March), and what it's kicking into high gear now represents an increase in the number of EUV layers. More specifically, Samsung says it increased the number of EUV layers to five, for what it says is the finest and most advanced DRAM process out there for emerging DDR5 memory solutions. And it arrives just as Intel is set to usher in the era of DDR5 in the consumer landscape, with the introduction of Alder Lake and its accompany Z690 platform. "Today, Samsung... Read more...
The first retail listing for a DDR5 memory kit with RGB lighting has popped up, and in doing so, we have an idea of where preliminary pricing will land. That's the good news. The bad news? It looks like DDR5 memory is not going to be cheap. That is to be expected to some extent when new technology emerges, and on the bright side, this is just a single listing. This new listing is for a 32GB (2x16GB) kit of GeIL Polaris RGB Sync DDR5-4800 memory, with a bright red or gray aluminum heastink and a strip of RGB lighting across the contoured top. The asking price is $349.99. That is definitely on the expensive side compared to DDR4 memory, no doubt to account for the faster transfer rate (4,800 MT/s)... Read more...
Next-generation DDR5 memory is not even out in earnest yet for consumers, but that has not stopped Adata from pursuing overclocking records...with its own RAM, of course. Adata has taken one of its 16GB DDR5 memory kits that is rated to run at 4,800 MT/s, and overclocked it to 8,118 MT/s. Not too shabby, eh? The kudos really belong to Adata's XPG division. Same company, but you can think of XPG being to Adata as Republic of Gamers (ROG) is to ASUS, if that makes sense. That being the case, the press release praises "XGP's know-how and expertise in pushing memory modules to their full potential" with this "record-breaking milestone." That is indeed and boisterous overclock beyond the stock specification.... Read more...
Back in May, Samsung unveiled a high-tech gadget for data centers called the CXL Memory Expander, essentially a memory expansion device that utilizes the newer Compute Express Link interconnect standard. As with most hardware, however, the clever device is only as good as the software. To address that fact, Samsung has now introduced what it says is the industry's first open-source software solution that is specifically designed to support the CXL memory platform. The upshot of Samsung's CXL memory expander is it allows clients to scale memory capacities and bandwidth in data centers to terabyte levels, going well beyond what was previously possible. CXL itself is an open, industry-supported... Read more...
When Joe Gamer is building a PC, he probably doesn't even look at qualified parts lists, like memory QVLs. Products made to a given standard typically "just work," at least to a good-enough degree for general use, and don't need to be individually validated. Things are different in the business world, though. There, it's best to stick with the qualified hardware, and indeed, some support agreements even require that you do so. That's why it's notable that Intel has qualified Kingston's DDR5 memory for its upcoming Alder Lake client platform. Kingston isn't the first vendor to be qualified, of course; that honor went to the first-party DRAM manufacturers—in this case, Samsung, Micron, and... Read more...
The big event where we expect Intel to announce its 12th generation Alder Lake processor family is just three weeks away. Lenovo has already spilled the beans on its Legion 9000K gaming desktop PC in the lead-up to the launch, while pricing from numerous ASUS motherboards has leaked. The latest company to jump on the Alder Lake bandwagon is Corsair, which tweeted out an image of its upcoming Vengeance DDR5 memory modules (pictured above). Baseline speeds for the next-generation memory speeds come in at DDR5-4800, while Corsair previously indicated that it is working to ramp to DDR5-6800 speeds in the near future. This would nearly double maximum bandwidth -- compared to DDR4-3200 -- to 51 GB/sec,... Read more...
Intel’s 12th generation Alder Lake processors are right around the corner, with an official announcement coming as soon as October 27th. However, in the lead-up to the launch, most of the leaks and news have surrounded the Alder Lake-S desktop family rather than the related laptop-centric processors. Thankfully, today we have some information to deliver on the laptop front courtesy of SanMax. Hermitage Akihabara posted images of sample SanMax DDR5 memory modules on display at PC Shop Arc. The 252-pin SO-DIMMs are rated for DDR5-4800 speeds (CL40) and operate at 1.1 volts. SanMax is using Micron memory for these modules, with these samples coming in at a 32GB capacity. The 32GB capacity... Read more...
In preparation for the arrival of Intel's upcoming Alder Lake CPUs and Z690 platform, TeamGroup is highlighting a couple of new DDR5 memory products, the T-Force Vulcan and T-Force Delta RGB. They are part of a larger online launch event, in which TeamGroup is unveiling a spate of products, including internal and external SSDs, and even a liquid-cooled SSD. Of course, SSDs have been around for quite some time, but DDR5 memory has been out of the realm of consumer platforms up until this point. That changes this year with Alder Lake. Intel's 12th Gen Core processors and accompanying platforms offer up support for the next-gen memory standard, as well as DDR4 memory. You won't be able to use both... Read more...
You can safely assume that motherboard makers will not be caught flat-footed when Intel's 12th Gen Core desktop processors based on Alder Lake arrive. There's plenty of work that goes on behind the scenes between CPU and motherboard players. Especially so with Alder Lake, I imagine, given all the new technologies. So I tend to believe a recent list of ASUS Z690 motherboards at the Eurasian Economic Commission website is probably accurate. Not only does it provide a list of more than a dozen Z690 motherboards from ASUS, but it also seemingly distinguishes between which models will offer up support for next-gen DDR5 memory, and which ones will stick with current DDR4 modules. Because remember,... Read more...
Some potentially exciting platform upgrades are on the horizon, two of them coming by way of Alder Lake and its accompanying Z690 series chipset. Namely, support for the PCI Express 5.0 bus, which doubles the bandwidth compared to PCI Express 4.0, and DDR5 memory. Will either matter? We can only wait and see, but as we do, a leaked benchmark gives us a high level look at a DDR5 memory kit that hitched its trailer to an Alder Lake CPU. This is arguably the most interesting technology of the two new bits (PCIe 5.0 and DDR5). We'll take the fatter bus, of course, but graphics cards are not really running into performance bottlenecks on PCIe 4.0. Maybe that will change when RDNA 3 (AMD) and Ada Lovelace... Read more...
For all of the leaks and rumors related to Intel's upcoming Alder Lake launch, actual CPU product photos have been very few and far between. So it is notable that the an Alder Lake CPU has smiled for the camera, giving us a mostly clear view of the bottom (it's not a high resolution image, but it is at least mostly devoid of blurriness). In addition, a supposed Z690 chipset diagram has manifested as well. For the most part, leaked Alder Lake benchmarks have hinted that Intel's hybrid architecture is the real deal, and will be a meaningful upgrade over its current generation CPUs. Obviously we will not know for sure until we have had a chance to put the chips through their paces ourselves, on... Read more...
Intel has added "enhanced Alder Lake support" to its extreme tuning utility (Intel XTU for short), ahead of actually launching its 12th Generation Core desktop processors. Make no mistake, Alder Lake is coming soon, and Intel is getting its ducks in a row. Same can be said about its hardware partners, with a bevy of 600-series motherboards on tap. We are all waiting to see what kind of performance Alder Lake will actually deliver. Early leaks have been a mixed bag, though mostly encouraging. What makes this launch so much more interesting than past ones, including Rocket Lake, is the a major architectural shift to a heterogeneous solution.  As outlined during the Intel Architecture Day 2021... Read more...
Do you think maybe the tech industry is hyper-focused on artificial intelligence (AI) technologies? It certainly is, and to some extent AI is practically everywhere these days, from servers and high-performance computing, to autonomous vehicles and everyday consumer devices, and everything in, around, and between. So it's not really shocking that Samsung is touting its latest advancements in processing-in-memory (PIM) technology at the Hot Chips 33 conference. Some of what Samsung is discussing has to do with past announcements. For example, back in February Samsung introduced the industry's first high bandwidth memory PIM, Aqualbolt-XL, with AI processing built into its HBM2 Aquabolt to bolster... Read more...
AMD has not exactly been shy about mentioning its upcoming Zen 4 architecture, or even providing some high level details on occasion. For example, we know it is has been designed on a 5-nanometer manufacturing process, and is on the roadmap for a 2022 debut. But AMD certainly knows more than it typically shares, and some additional details have seemingly been confirmed in a recently leaked document. Leaks and rumors should typically not be viewed as confirmed information. In this case, however, the documents appear to come from AMD, and were made public after hackers infiltrated Gigabyte, stole some data, and tried to extort a ransom from the company. It does not appear as though Gigabyte paid... Read more...
TeamGroup was among the first to make its DDR5 modules available to the public, even though platforms supporting the next-generation memory standard haven't shipped yet. However, those were "standard" DDR5-4800 kits without fancy heatsinks or other design flourishes. However, TeamGroup's T-Force brand is catering to enthusiasts that want to "RGB All The Things" by announcing new Delta RGB DDR5 modules. As you can clearly see, this is an evolution of T-Force's existing Delta DDR4 family of modules and is available in either white or black. And living up to its namesake, there are RGB lighting effects along the edge of the heatsink that you can sync up with your control software. According to TeamGroup,... Read more...
Memory makers are not necessarily waiting around for next-gen platforms to arrive before unveiling or releasing DDR5 RAM modules. PNY certainly is not. The company announced it is adding DDR5-4800 memory kits to its lineup "to support the growing lineup of motherboards" that will be compatible with the DDR5 standard. As of right now, there's not a single consumer motherboard or platform that supports DDR5. However, such products are right around the corner, starting with Intel's upcoming Alder Lake launch. Alder Lake is set to be Intel's major push into hybrid (or heterogeneous) computing, and its accompanying 600-series chipset will support next-gen technologies, including DDR5 memory and PCI... Read more...
It won't be long now before we can run some officially sanctioned benchmarks with finalized Alder Lake silicon, assuming no last minute delays put a cramp in Intel's plans to release its next-gen CPUs before the end of the year. Alder Lake is poised to be an interesting launch for multiple reasons, one of which is that it supports both DDR4 and DDR5 memory. While we wait to see how it all shakes out, a couple of benchmark leaks gives us an early look at how performance might compare when going from one to the other. Direct comparisons are a little tricky because both memory types will not be supported on the same motherboard. So there will be platform differences, in addition to using different... Read more...
Intel's upcoming Alder Lake launch will usher in the start of the DDR5 era in the consumer space, and then sometime next year, AMD will hop on board with its Zen 4 lineup. This is going to result in higher bandwidth memory products, with transfers (or 'speed' if you prefer to call it that) starting at 6,400MT/s. The added bandwidth could come at a cost, and not just a monetary one, but also paid for in heat. It is hard to know exactly what to expect just yet, because even though some early DDR5 memory kits landed on Amazon a few weeks ago, they have not arrived in earnest. What we do know, however, are the finalized official specifications laid out by JEDEC, and how DDR5 will differ from DDR4... Read more...
In late April, research firm TrendForce sounded alarm bells when it projected that soaring PC demand would mean bad news for PC DRAM prices. At the time, the company showed PC DRAM prices increases of 23 to 28 percent during Q2 2021, with an increase in the average selling price (ASP) jumping by as much as 23 percent. However, the firm is singing a different turn for its Q3 2021 projections. It now forecasts that PC DRAM prices will only increase by 3 to 8 percent quarter-over-quarter. According to TrendForce, “most of these brands are still carrying about 8-10 weeks’ worth of PC DRAM inventory,” which accounts for the smaller price increase for Q3. We should note that PC DRAM... Read more...
The first commercial DDR5 modules are now available, but there's only one problem. There are no motherboards or processor platforms to support them… yet. TeamGroup announced earlier this month that its Elite DDR5-4800 modules would be available to purchase by the end of June, and the company wasn't kidding. Both Amazon and Newegg are currently carrying the Elite DDR5-4800 kit, which includes two 16GB 288-pin ECC unbuffered DIMMs (Part Number: TED532G4800C40DC01). As previously reported, these modules operate at 1.1 volts with timings of CL40-40-40-77. As with all DDR5 modules, the voltage regulator module (VRM) is integrated along with the Power Management IC (PMIC). This kit doesn't come... Read more...
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