Items tagged with Windows 7

In this episode of HotHardware's Two And A Half Geeks webcast, Marco, Brittany, Chris and Dave discuss the Best of CES 2020, AMD's hot new Ryzen 4000 Mobile processors, Intel's encouraging DG1 graphics demo, Alienware's sweet new Concept UFO gaming handheld PC, Lenovo's ThinkPad X1 Fold foldable tablet PC, and what to do about that Windows 7 migration that you need to make the jump for to Windows 10 -- and of course, details of our latest giveaway with Lenovo! Show Notes:  1:47 - HotHardware's 12 Best Of CES 2020 2:33 - Alienware Concept UFO Invades Nintendo Switch-Style Gaming With PC Master Race Assimilation 7:50 - AMD Unveils Ryzen 4000 Mobile With Bold Performance Claims, Insane 64-Core... Read more...
Unless you been living under a rock, then you know that Microsoft ended official extended support for Windows 7 on Tuesday. That means that Microsoft is no longer providing product updates or security patches for the operating system -- that is unless you are a corporate customer that pays a yearly per device fee for Windows 7 Extended Security Updates. For those that have decided to stay put on Windows 7, you may have noticed a new annoyance courtesy of Microsoft. As the company promised last month, it is now relaying full-screen nag warnings in Windows 7 to prompt folks to upgrade to Windows 10. You can see the nag screen in the header image above, and the text reads: Your Windows... Read more...
While Microsoft has closed one door (Windows 7), it has opened another one with respect to web browsers (Microsoft Edge). As promised, Microsoft has made available the public/stable release of its Chromium-based Edge web browser. Microsoft first made its intentions known that it would switch to Chromium back in December 2018, thus leaving behind the EdgeHTML engine. That move drew swift backlash from Mozilla -- the makers of Firefox -- but Microsoft continued development over the past year. After a steady stream of developer and public betas, the all-new Edge browser is ready for action. Due to the fact that Edge is based on Chromium -- the same engine that powers the world's most... Read more...
With today being the last day of extended support for Windows 7, many people are poised to make the jump to Windows 10. As we've reported in previous how-to articles, as long as you're running a genuine copy of Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 8.1, you can make the upgrade to Windows 10 for free and Microsoft is encouraging this migration as soon as possible. However, given that you've probably been running Windows 7 for years, we've got a few helpful tips to make your transition to Windows 10 as easy and glitch-free as possible. 1 - Make sure your PC meets the minimum system requirements for Windows 10 Windows 10 isn't exactly a demanding operating system, and chances are... Read more...
This week is a big one for Microsoft, as the company is pulling the plug on its Windows 7 operating system. The "death" of the operating system means that product updates and security patch deployments will be cut off. The company will, however, still provide Microsoft Security Essentials definition updates for until further notice. Last week, we learned that Google will still support Chrome on Windows 7 for quite some time. In fact, the company says that it won't end support for the operating system until at least July 15th, 2021. Today, Microsoft made its intentions clear for the Chromium-based Edge browser on Windows 7. According to Microsoft representatives that... Read more...
Windows 7 extended support ends tomorrow, as we're detailed on numerous occasions. For most people, the most obvious "fix" would be to upgrade to Windows 10, which just about anyone can do for free as long as you're running an authorized, genuine copy of Windows 7 or Windows 8.x.  However, the folks over at Microsoft have another, more expensive proposition for those that are running an older Windows 7 PC. The company is encouraging businesses to just buy one of its Surface-branded computers. Going out and purchasing a brand new, fully functioning PC when a free upgrade to Windows 10 would suffice for most businesses seems like overkill, but Microsoft is trying to move hardware here,... Read more...
In the words of Willie Nelson, "Turn out the lights, the party's over, they say that all good things must end." Well, the party's almost over, anyway—after more than a decade of dutiful service to the PC faithful, Microsoft is officially ending support for Windows 7 on Tuesday, January 14. For the most part, that means no more security updates and no more support. There will be exceptions, of course. If a major malware threat emerges, Microsoft may opt to dish out an emergency patch, just as it did with Windows XP when WannaCry was making the rounds. And for businesses that just are not ready to quite the legacy, there is the option of paying for extended support to keep the party going... Read more...
Time is winding down on Microsoft's extended support for Windows 7. Windows 7 emerged on the scene in 2009 with a bang, replacing the unloved and problematic Windows Vista operating system. Seen by many as the "true" successor to Windows XP, customers and businesses upgraded to Windows 7 in droves, and stuck with it even after Windows 8.x and Windows 10 arrived on the scene years later. But this week, January 14th to be exact, Microsoft will end extended support leaving customers on their own. There will be no more product updates or security patches for the operating system, which is to be expected considering that is over a decade old.  For businesses that are sticking with Windows... Read more...
Microsoft is nearly ready to pull the plug on Windows 7; at least for general consumers. Starting next week, January 14thto be exact, Microsoft will end extended support for the operating system after more than a decade on the market. As you might expect, instead of diverting resources to keep Windows 7 operational, Microsoft would rather you upgrade to its newer Windows 10 operating system. With that being said, some software developers won't be so quick to part ways with Windows 7 compatibility, and one of those companies is none other than Google. Google Chrome is the most popular web browser around the globe, and a great number of Windows 7 users have it installed on their systems. While... Read more...
It's been a long run, but it's coming time for Microsoft to end extended support for the Windows 7 operating system. Microsoft first released Windows 7 to the public over 10 years ago, and it was an instant hit with long-time Windows users. Given the disaster that was Windows Vista, Windows 7 built on the strong underlying foundation of Vista. However, it added a lot of polish and robust device support which enticed customers that had been spoiled by the long-in-the-tooth Windows XP operating system. Windows 7 Support Ends In January Microsoft has set a January 14th, 2020 termination date for Windows 7 extended support. Microsoft issued the following warning earlier this year: January 14th, 2020... Read more...
As you might already be aware, Microsoft is getting ready to lower the curtain on Windows 7, with the end of support date scheduled for January 14, 2020. After that, most users still clinging to Windows 7 will need to upgrade in order to stay protected from the latest threats. Well, sort of. While Microsoft will no longer push out monthly updates to Windows 7, it will continue to offer signature updates for Microsoft Security Essentials (MSE). Microsoft confirmed plans to keep MSE updated when a user specifically asked about it on the company's community forums during an Ask Me Anything (AMA) session. The confusion stemmed from a related FAQ, in which Microsoft said in no uncertain terms, "No,... Read more...
Microsoft really wants its customers to abandon the Windows 7 operating system, and for good reason. For starters, Windows 7 was released over a decade ago, and has by this point been superseded by Windows 8.x and Windows 10. In addition, with respect to performance, security, and functionality, Windows 10 is by far the superior choice in most cases. More importantly, supporting Windows 7 for this long consumes company resources that could be otherwise spent on more important things -- like maintaining Windows 10 and its successors. With this in mind, Microsoft has set a January 14th, 2020 end date for Windows 7 extended support. At that point, the only enterprise customers that pay for Windows... Read more...
The end of extended support for Windows 7 is fast approaching, and Microsoft has been doing everything in its power to get users to upgrade to Windows 10. The most visible way that Microsoft has been nudging users has been to display pop-up nag screens encouraging them to abandon the 10-year-old operating system. Officially, extended support ends on January 14th, 2020 -- meaning no more OS or security updates -- but Microsoft will allow enterprise customers to pay for continual updates to Windows 7. Microsoft is charging between $25 to $200 per workstation (per year) for Windows 7 Extended Security Updates (ESUs). However, community members over at My Digital Life have... Read more...
Are you still using Windows 7 or Windows 8/8.1? Windows 10 was released over four years ago, but you can still get with the times and get Microsoft's latest OS it without paying a dime. A loophole continues to allow users to upgrade to Windows 10 for free nearly three years after their initial free upgrade offer. Windows 10 was first released in July 2015. Many people were reluctant to upgrade due to privacy concerns and interface preferences. Microsoft decided to sweeten the deal by allowing users to upgrade to Windows 10 for free during its first year of availability. The free upgrade should have technically expired in 2016, but users are still able to take advantage of it. Why is that the... Read more...
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