Items tagged with right to repair

The right to repair movement is about to get a much needed boost. The Massachusetts state legislature plans to host a public hearing regarding their “Digital Right to Repair” bills. Many anticipate that this will be the largest hearing in support of this kind of legislation. Many have argued that the policies of large tech companies have hurt consumers and small businesses. The proposed legislation would “establish fair and reasonable terms for providing diagnostic, service or repair information and services for digital electronic products.” Manufacturers would also be prohibited from installing software on a device that would prevent it from being repaired by a third-party.... Read more...
Apple has been under fire for years with regards to its onerous policies regarding "unofficial" hardware repairs. Most recently, Apple began displaying warning messages within iOS for iPhone users that had their batteries replaced with non-genuine hardware. For some people that live nowhere close to an Apple Store or an Apple authorized service centers, getting repairs performed by indie shops is the only course of action if they want to have their device fixed within a reasonable amount of time. And given that Apple wouldn't provide genuine hardware replacements, tools, or manuals necessary to perform repairs to non-authorized shops, the company was in fact exacerbating the problem.... Read more...
When it comes to the Right to Repair movement, Apple is definitely not onboard. Apple is a company that feels that its devices are so complex that regular consumers shouldn't be burdened with tasks such as replacing the battery or a cracked display on their devices -- even people with the proper skillset to do so. This staunch defense of its IP and how it is handled post-sale extends to third-party repair shops that aren't "Apple Certified". In the case of one Norwegian repair company, Apple has unleashed its legal attack dogs over a relatively small sum of money. According to a report by Motherboard, Apple decided to sue the owner of PCKompaniet, Henrik Huseby, over components... Read more...
Apple touts its T2 security chip as "the next generation of security" for its 13-inch and 15-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar models, pitching it as a feature and benefit to customers. Is it really, though? The T2 chip has come under fire for its ability to effectively thwart third-party repairs. The answer, as it turns out, is not a simple one. First let's talk about what the T2 security chip actually does. On Apple's website, the company describes various functions of the chip, all of which sound like selling points for a potential buyer. "The Apple T2 security chip includes a Secure Enclave co-processor that provides the foundation for secure boot and encrypted storage capabilities. It also... Read more...
California is attempting to push through legislation that would requires smartphone makers and other electronic gadget manufactures to provide consumers with diagnostic and repair information, as well as equipment or service parts. The proposed "Right to Repair Act" is in response to the growing difficulty of do-it-yourself repairs, both on the part of product owners and independent repair shops. "The Right to Repair Act will provide consumers with the freedom to have their electronic products and appliances fixed by a repair shop or service provider of their choice, a practice that was taken for granted a generation ago but is now becoming increasingly rare in a world of planned obsolescence,"... Read more...