Items tagged with Like

Western Digital is a big fan of text files, and assumes you are too. It has disabled the ability of its 1TB network-ready drive to share MP3, AVI, MPEGs... well, pretty much any audio or video file you could name.  The "My Book World Edition" drive assumes the world is full of typists, I guess.Access to multimedia files is allowed only by the primary user registered on WD Anywhere Access, the remote desktop client embedded on the NAS device, said Brian Miller, director of marketing at Western Digital.Anywhere Access is based on the MioNet remote desktop client, which allows users to access, read, edit and share files on remote desktops. The Anywhere Access client allows remote users access... Read more...
The Romantics had a hit. What I Like About You.  It was one and done for them, hit-wise, but they've certainly managed to milk that old cow for three decades now. They figure there might be a few drops of 2% in the old holstein yet, as they're suing Activision, makers of the Guitar Hero game. They claim that even though Activision paid for the rights to have a cover band re-record it for the game, the new version sounds too much like the old version. This argument is a cousin of the trademark claim that the Supreme Court killed off in Dastar  v. Twentieth Century Fox.  The band apparently reframes its argument in the language of publicity rights (Guitar Hero has mis-appropriated... Read more...
The digital grassy knoll set's collective head is about to explode. Apple is collecting iPhone usage data, linked to the user's specific personal information. Apple gathers that personal information when you sign up for an iPhone, and may be doing  something or nothing with it after associating it with your usage data. People's opinions on this seem to depend on the ratio of Apple fanboy to paranoid privacy nut you are. If you're 100% both, this is bad news:From this information, Apple could build a profile on users.  Where they travel, where they spend their free time, where they work, where they invest their money, what they browse, etc etc.  Obviously most users would like to... Read more...
We love YouTube. It's got a lot of competition for your postage stamp size viewing pleasure, but it's still the default setting for looking for video clips on the Net. Speaking at a conference yesterday, co-founder Steve Chen has confirmed that YouTube is going to make high-quality video streams available soon.Chen told [c/net reporter Rafe Needleman] that he expects that high-quality YouTube vids will be available to everyone within three months.Chen also confirmed that in YouTube's internal archive, all video is stored at the native resolution in which it was sent in. However, he said, a large portion of YouTube videos are pretty poor quality to begin with -- 320 x 240. Streaming them in high-quality... Read more...
It wasn't all that long ago that online music vendors starting selling DRM-free tracks, often at a small premium and/or small loss of audio fidelity.  At the time it was viewed by some as a marketing experiment to see if people would pay more to avoid  headaches related to Digital Rights Management, and now it appears that there is a definitive answer to that question:“DRM-free music sells at a much higher rate online than protected music, according to UK-based digital music store 7 Digital. In fact, customers buy it four times as often as they do DRMed music. As a result, almost 80 percent of the store's sales are of DRM-free content. 7 Digital may not sound familiar to some, but it... Read more...
Solar arrays in space, delivering power to the Earth.  Something seen frequently in science fiction movies and books.  It's always been seen as financially unviable, but if someone with really deep pockets like the military were interested ...A new Pentagon study lays out the roadmap for a multibillion-dollar push to the final frontier of energy: a satellite system that collects gigawatts’ worth of solar power and beams it down to Earth.The military itself could become the “anchor tenant” for such a power source, due to the current high cost of fueling combat operations abroad, the study says.Even for the military, the cost would be tremendous, and it would still not be financially... Read more...
Unfortunately, MHz makes a difference.  Changes to the system requirements for the next Apple operating system could exclude those systems with 800 MHz CPUs.The increase in system requirements would exclude a number of Mac systems from running Leopard, such as the 800MHz PowerBook G4 (Titanium), 800MHz PowerMac G4 (Quicksilver), 800MHz iMac G4, 800MHz iBook G4 and 800MHz eMac. All the systems affected are at least four years old. Four years old?  Shoot, those systems are archaic ... not.  But seriously, you wouldn't expect a four year old system to run Vista?  Or would you?... Read more...
For years the defense department and even some large corporations have utilized games as a method of teaching people various trade tasks.  It appears that miners are perhaps the newest recipients of 'video game' based training.Considering the staggering cost of serious mining equipment (think 7 and 8 figures each), the idea of training and even employment pre-qualification on a virtual platform might make sense.  It certainly seems that it makes sense to Caterpillar, who brought their video game 'simulation' to Peru this week for a mining convention.  Apparently the new training method earned some new fans:“Giant video games with throaty diesel engines powering monster-sized earth movers, excavators... Read more...
Sony announced four new models of Blu-ray disc recorder/players today. The new models have big capacity -- up to 16 hours of hi-def programming on 50 GB discs. The most expensive model has a 500GB hard drive, to boot, but you'll pay for it -- $1752. Note to Sony: the room I watch movies in didn't cost that much to build.  "With high-definition TVs spreading rapidly and more digital cameras and camcorders are becoming HD-ready, time is ripe for household recorders to move onto a next generation," Sony Executive Deputy President Katsumi Ihara told a news conference. "We intend to make all our recorders in the domestic market Blu-ray compatible," he said.... Read more...
George Ou must like getting hate mail. He had the nerve to point out that "Vista puts Mac OS X font rendering to shame," and has the screen caps to demonstrate it. George does not seem to understand that for five percent of the population, anything that ships from Redmond is made in a cauldron of snake's venom in Sauron's cave, while Steve Jobs goes to the bathroom and emits only Evian water. While font technology isn’t what’s typically considered a killer application or killer feature, it is by far one of the most important usability features in an operating system.  We simply cannot place a price tag on eye strain and someone who works all day long in front of a computer like me greatly... Read more...
There's bad, and then there's evil. But spammers are worse than evil. And the worst version of evil is to use our beloved Homer Simpson to trick you into giving up your e-mail address, and then signing you up for a spam barrage. Don't click on that survey about the Simpsons movie. The spammed e-mails try to lure unsuspecting users to a Web site, where their e-mail addresses will be harvested for later spamming attacks, according to researchers at Sophos. To get users to visit the site, the spam claims recipients will be given a $500 Visa gift card if they click on a link and participate in an online survey about the movie. Each e-mail contains... Read more...
Reports of the unpopularity of Microsoft Windows Vista operating system are widespread -- and according to Bill Gates -- wrong. Forty million copies have been sold already, which is faster than the sales rate for Windows XP. That already exceeds  the entire number of people using anything offered by Microsoft's main competitiors. Gates also announced several new partners for its Windows Home Server product, including Gateway and Medion. Microsoft has already said HP will have home servers based on the technology later this year. Gates said Windows Home Server will launch in the autumn. He also said smaller computer makers, known as system builders, will be able to build... Read more...
Naval Ravikant is an example of the new face of dotcom startups. He sees the method of nurturing startup ideas with venture capital cash as less of a bank and more like a movie studio. Ravikant runs a tight ship, with hard deadlines. "The engineers have the freedom to experiment, but they have 90 days to ship a product," he says. "The product has to grow organically, without any marketing." Those that are still growing on their own 12 months later get to live. They also receive more funding, and Ravikant plugs them into a distribution network he's building. Web products that don't hit their growth numbers get killed -- a far cry from the old incubator system, which kept... Read more...
Research  In Motion, makers of the popular Blackberry handheld,  is  going to offer software to allow smartphone users running Windows Mobile 6.0 to use the Blackberry's applications without  changing their hardware. “Extending BlackBerry applications to a broader range of devices is an important element of RIM's strategy to provide an open platform that supports industry standards and addresses the various needs of our customers and partners,” said Mike Lazaridis, President and Co-CEO at Research In Motion. “This new software will provide a range of important benefits, including easier support of Windows Mobile-based devices within BlackBerry Enterprise Server environments, a consistent... Read more...
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