Items tagged with galaxy note 7

Samsung employees have had a rough few months, and things are only going to get worse -- the South Korean corporation's annual performance reviews are just around the corner. In the wake of the disastrous Galaxy Note 7 release and recall, many mobile phone employees fear that their salaries will be significantly decreased, or that they will be fired. Samsung’s mobile employees were once celebrated and credited with helping to more firmly establish the corporation’s global presence. The mobile unit accounted for only 27% of Samsung’s revenue in 2010. This number skyrocketed to 61% in 2013. Those who worked in the mobile unit negotiated with some of Samsung’s biggest customers and consequently... Read more...
Just in case you have been living under a rock for the two months or so, you should probably know that the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 is not exactly the safest phone on the planet. After several fires, including on a parked Southwest Airlines airplane, many countries have banned the Galaxy Note 7 from all airline flights. Now, weveral “exchange” stations have popped up at major airports so that users can get rid of their Galaxy Note 7’s before heading onto their flights. The exchange booths first appeared in South Korea at the Incheon International Airport. The stations have now appeared throughout the world. Flyers have reported exchange booths at LAX and San Francisco International Airport, while... Read more...
Samsung is unique among smartphone manufacturers in that it not only produces its own System-on-Chip (SoC) designs, such as the Exynos processor that's found in some of its handsets, but it is the only phone maker that performs its own battery tests. Unfortunately Samsung, that differentiating trait recently blew up in its face, figuratively and somewhat literally.Overheating and exploding batteries are what led to the downfall of Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 phone. The company's internal testing revealed no problems with either the original model, which ended up being recalled, or the replacement phones that used a different battery packs but were still prone to catching fire. That's a problem for... Read more...
While it's of little consequence to Samsung at this point, Galaxy Note 7 phones will no longer be allowed on airplanes in the United States. The outright ban goes into effect today at noon ET and covers all Galaxy Note 7 handsets, including replacement devices that were originally thought to be immune from overheating and catching fire. It turns out that they weren't. The U.S. Department of Transportation met with officials from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) to issue what they're calling an "emergency order." Anyone who owns or possesses a Galaxy Note 7 is not allowed to bring it on a flight going to or coming... Read more...
Samsung has officially given up on trying to fix its fiery Galaxy Note 7 phone. All that's left at this point is to collect the remaining handsets, both original models and replacement devices, and get customers situated with either a refund or a different phone. As an olive branch to customers burned (literally and figuratively) by the Galaxy Note 7 debacle, Samsung is offering up to a $100 bill credit if they choose to swap it out for one of its other models. Customers are under no obligation to stick with Samsung, of course, and some may choose not to if they've lost faith in the company's quality and assurance testing. After all, Samsung thought it had things figured out when it initially... Read more...
The Galaxy Note 7 launch has been nothing short of a disaster for Samsung, and now that it's pulled the plug on production of the troubled device, it has to shift focus to whatever the next big thing is. In the meantime, Samsung cut its fiscal third-quarter profit forecast—it now expects to record an operating profit of 5.2 trillion Korean won (around $4.6 billion in U.S. currency), down from a previous estimate of 7.8 trillion won.Samsung's previous forecast took into consideration its global recall of Galaxy Note 7 devices. However, it didn't anticipate that replacement handsets would also be prone to overheating and catching fire, or that it would eventually throw in the towel and count the... Read more...
Let the housekeeping begin. Now that Samsung has officially thrown in the towel and given up trying to fix its fire-prone Galaxy Note 7 device, all that's left is to get remaining models (including replacement handsets) off the street and call for an industry quarantine. With regards to the latter, Oculus got the ball rolling by stating in no uncertain terms that it no longer supports the Galaxy Note 7 on its platform and the Gear VR."Oculus is removing support for all Note 7 devices on the Oculus platform. Until further notice, Note 7 devices will not be compatible with the Gear VR," reads a new disclaimer on the Gear VR's product page.If you're wondering why Oculus has a dog in this fight,... Read more...
Updated 10/11/2016 @ 8:11am Samsung has announced that it is ending all production and sales of the Galaxy Note 7. The company issued the following statement: "Taking our customer’s safety as our highest priority, we have decided to halt sales and production of the Galaxy Note 7.” Our original piece continues below:The lengthy [and explosive] Galaxy Note 7 saga is getting closer to what some feel might be its logical conclusion — the complete removal of all of these devices from the marketplace. Last night, we reported that AT&T and T-Mobile had suspended sales of all replacement Galaxy Note 7 smartphone following a rash of new fires. Since that time, Verizon and Sprint have both joined their... Read more...
Samsung is wisely choosing to err on the side of caution by suspending production of its troubled Galaxy Note 7 smartphone that's been making headlines for all the wrong reasons. What started off as a promising Android device for people who like larger size Android handsets has earned a reputation as a potentially dangerous gadget that's prone to overheating and catching fire.An official at one of Samsung's suppliers told Yonhap News Agency that the company is cooperating with safety regulators from South Korea, the United States, and China, all three of which presumably urged Samsung to stop building Galaxy Note 7 phones until this whole mess can be fully investigated and properly sorted out."This... Read more...
“This is the end, beautiful friend / This is the end, my only friend, the end.” The End is an iconic song by The Doors, but it’s two major U.S. wireless carriers that are showing Samsung’s Galaxy Note7 the door — likely permanently. The news that AT&T and T-Mobile have completely given up hope that the Galaxy Note7 can be redeemed comes following the news that a total of five replacement devices have caught fire in the past week. “Based on recent reports, we’re no longer exchanging new Note 7s at this time, pending further investigation of these reported incidents, said an AT&T representative to CNNMoney. Given the bad press surrounding the Galaxy Note7 and its penchant for spontaneously... Read more...
The Galaxy Note 7 might be a lost cause for Samsung. Following a global recall due to overheating batteries and a report of a replacement device going up in smoke on a grounded Southwest Airlines plane, AT&T, the second largest wireless carrier in the United States behind Verizon, is considering halting sales of Galaxy Note 7 devices altogether. Sprint, the fourth largest wireless carrier in the U.S., recently announced it would exchange replacement Galaxy Note 7 devices with any other smartphone. But if AT&T decides to go ahead and yank the troubled smartphone from its shelves, it's easy to envision other carriers following suit. Even if they don't, losing AT&T's sales would be a... Read more...
Customers that stuck by Samsung’s side during this tumultuous month involving battery-related Galaxy Note7 fires might be losing their patience, but fourth-place wireless carrier Sprint is doing everything in its power to make customers whole again. When reports of battery fires first flared up, customers were given the chance to get a refund, opt for a cheaper Galaxy S7/Galaxy S7 Edge, or get a replacement Galaxy Note7 that wasn’t prone to spontaneously combusting. However, as we saw this week with a supposedly “safe” replacement Galaxy Note7 catching fire on a [thankfully] parked Southwest plane, there are likely customers that have had enough at this point. Sprint says anyone that has received... Read more...
It's a good thing Samsung doesn't only sell smartphones, lest it could have been looking at a bleak earnings report for its fiscal third quarter. Instead, the South Korean electronics maker saw its profit grow by 5.6 percent, higher than what analysts had estimated, as its other businesses picked up the slack from its Galaxy Note 7 troubles.Samsung had to issue a global recall of its Galaxy Note 7 phones after it was discovered that the batteries it was using were prone to overheating and catching fire. There were several reports of exploding Galaxy Note 7 devices causing personal and property damage, such as setting ablaze a Jeep Grand Cherokee in one instance.Early estimates had Samsung taking... Read more...
Samsung's nightmare scenario with its fire-prone Galaxy Note 7 launch continues as yet another handset—this time a replacement phone that's supposed to be unaffected by the original recall—overheated and emitted heavy smoke. It happened on a grounded Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 that was scheduled to travel from Louisville to Baltimore. The crew was able to evacuate all passengers on board through the plane's main cabin door. There were no injuries reported, though it's the aftermath that could be the most damaging in a number of ways, most relating to Samsung. Federal regulators and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission have both launched an investigation to determine how and why this... Read more...
Samsung opened itself up to criticism over the way it initially tried to handle a global recall of millions of Galaxy Note 7 devices on its own and it caught some heat as a result, but in giving credit where credit is due, the South Korean handset maker deserves praise for bouncing back and making quick work out of exchanging defective handsets for working models that aren't prone to exploding. That's underscored by Samsung now having replaced half a million recalled handsets in the U.S. "Samsung Electronics America, Inc. announced today that about half of all recalled Galaxy Note 7 phones sold in the U.S. have been exchanged through Samsung’s voluntary recall. Additionally, 90 percent of Galaxy... Read more...
Samsung on Monday announced that more than half a million replacement Galaxy Note 7 smartphones had shipped to carrier and retail stores in the U.S.. Sure enough, a day later they're starting to show as being in-stock at places such as Verizon and Sprint, and we suspect that other wireless carriers (AT&T and T-Mobile at the very least) won't be far behind. It's a good sign for Samsung that wireless carriers are again listing its Galaxy Note 7 device. Analysts had predicted that the Galaxy Note 7 debacle could end up costing Samsung as much as $1 billion, and the company's already seen its market capitalization drop by $22 billion as skittish investors opted to put their money elsewhere. However,... Read more...
It's taken longer than it should have getting to this point, but Samsung has finally cooperated with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to formally recall 1 million of its Galaxy Note 7 smartphones. As part of the recall, Samsung said it's received 92 reports of batteries overheating in the U.S., including 26 reports of burns and 55 incidents involving property damage, among them fires in cars and a garage. "This recall involves the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphone sold before September 15, 2016. The recalled devices have a 5.7-inch screen and were sold in the following colors: black onyx, blue coral, gold platinum and silver titanium with a matching stylus. Samsung is printed... Read more...
After making a series of moves to restructure its mobile business and renew interest in its Galaxy handset line, the situation with the recently released Galaxy Note 7 is taking quite a toll on Samsung. The South Korean electronics firm saw its market capitalization plummet by $22 billion over the past two days, a direct result of the global recall of Galaxy Note 7 devices that are prone to overheat and catch fire.This is just a bad situation all around. For consumers, the risk of a Galaxy Note 7 device exploding is a scary thing, especially with the influx of reports detailing various damage caused by affected handsets. In just the past couple of weeks, overheating Galaxy Note 7 devices have... Read more...
It's a pretty scary thing when an electronic gadget is prone to exploding and catching fire, as has been reported to happen several of Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 devices out in the wild. Adding fuel to the fire (see what we did there?), Samsung's been criticized for the way its handled the subsequent recall. It's still figuring out how best to handle the situation, and one option it has is to remotely deactivate potentially defective Galaxy Note 7 devices after a certain date. A user on reddit claims that Samsung's France division is planning to do exactly that. He was told by someone at Samsung that the South Korean electronics firm that it's in the process of calling every single Galaxy Note 7... Read more...
Update 4:25PM - Samsung is also now urging customers not to use their Galaxy Note 7 devices, stating: "Because your safety is our utmost concern, we ask you to power down your Galaxy Note7 and exchange it now. We strongly encourage you to take advantage of the U.S. Note7 Exchange Program detailed above." You can find Samsung's notice here and their statements in the FAQ.To say that the launch of the Galaxy Note7 has been less-than-ideal for Samsung would be a gross understatement. Almost immediately following the device's shipment in market, it was discovered that some batteries in certain devices had a design flaw that could cause them to catch fire, or more accurately, explode. News of a recall... Read more...
More bad news for Samsung, though not entirely unexpected. Due to concerns over a handful of recent reports of Galaxy Note 7 devices overheating and exploding, the United Stated Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued a statement to passengers that "strongly advises" them not to turn on the fire-prone device during flights. The FAA doesn't typically single out manufacturers and specific models when issuing warnings. Doing it now underscores the severity of the situation and the FAA's level of concern, though the agency stopped short of outright banning Galaxy Note 7 devices on flights. Instead, it suggested that passengers don't turn them on, charge them, or even stow Galaxy Note 7 handsets... Read more...
While the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration considers banning Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 handset outright from passenger aircraft, three airlines in Australia—Qantas, Jetstar, and Virgin Australia—have decided to continue letting the potentially explosive gadget on board, so long as passengers don't use or charge them during flight. The usage ban stems from reports of Galaxy Note 7 devices overheating while charging and exploding into flames. In one recent incident that made headlines, a Galaxy Note 7 caught fire in a hotel room, causing $1,400 in damage in burned bed sheets, charred carpet, and other things that needed replaced. Samsung agreed to replace the handset and pay the full hotel bill,... Read more...
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