Items tagged with Chrome

Google is taking another step towards making the web browsing experience a more pleasant one, as it pertains to videos that annoyingly fire up automatically on some sites. Earmarked for a future build of its Chrome browser is the disabling of autoplay for videos that are accompanied by sound, Google announced in Chromium blog post. The idea is to make "autoplay more consistent with user expectations" while giving users more control over audio. The feature update will roll out with Chrome 64. Websites will still be allowed to automatically play videos, but only if the media is not accompanied by... Read more...
Just a couple of weeks ago, we took a look at the [then] forthcoming version 61 of Google's Chrome, which introduces some notable features, including support for a slew of new APIs. Chrome 61 is now available in the release channel; if you're using Chrome right now, chances are you can update simply by restarting your browser. The exact version out today is 61.0.3163.79, and it's available for Windows, Linux, and macOS. It's really hard to weigh one of the updated features over another, as what's more useful really depends on your usage case. But one of Google's outed feature is new JavaScript... Read more...
If you’re a heavy user of the Chrome internet browser, and you most likely are, then Google has some changes in the works that will make your daily travails less nerve racking. There are few things more annoying on the internet than websites that autoplay videos — be it original content from the site itself or advertisements — that blast audio upon loading the page. Google previously tackled this problem by flagging the tab of an offending website with a speaker icon. This allowed you to quickly spot which site/tab was causing all the ruckus, and either close it down or hit the pause button on... Read more...
The latest beta version of Chrome, version 61, has just dropped, and it brings with it a healthy collection of enhancements and new features. This beta is relevant seemingly for every platform it's regularly offered for, except iOS. Android, Mac, Linux, Chrome OS, and of course Windows are all taken care of with this update. Arguably, the most notable addition to Chrome 61 is support for the Payment Request API, which will let websites send a payment request to the browser (securely), allowing people to pay via Android Pay on the desktop. Ultimately, when a wide rollout happens, it means that buying... Read more...
Most PCs may run some variant of Microsoft Windows operating system, but Google's Chrome browser still rules the internet browser roost. According to various studies conducted by StatCounter and NetMarketShare, Chrome tightly holds onto nearly 60% of the market share. Microsoft Edge, however, barely claimed a 5% share, despite the fact that 91% of PCs are running a Windows OS of some version.  Chrome enjoyed dominance this past year throughout all regions and over various device categories. StatCounter claims that Google Chrome enjoys a 53.91% total share, while NetMarketShare argues... Read more...
It’s been eight years in the making, but Mozilla is now rolling out multiprocess support to its production branch of Firefox via the Electrolysis (E10s) project. Firefox 54 is being billed as “the best Firefox ever” and uses its multiprocess support to enable web users, who often have a dozen (or dozens of) tabs open at a time, to enjoy a faster and more stable browsing experience. In the case of Firefox 54, E10s spreads all open tabs across up to four open processes. This allows Firefox 54 to make better use of system resources, and in the event that one rogue tab causes issues that could hamper... Read more...
Are you still partying like it's 1999 on a 32-bit browser? Pshaw! To borrow a line for Weird Al Yankovic, "What kinda chip you got in there, a Dorito?" Well, Google is having none of it. Users running Chrome on a 64-bit Windows system with at least 4GB of RAM installed will be migrated from 32-bit to 64-bit, so long as they have Chrome configured to automatically update itself. The migration will take place with Chrome 58, which Google has already started to dole out. if a user wants to go back to using the 32-bit build for any reason, it will still be available to download (manually). However,... Read more...
If you're using Google's Chrome browser as your primary vehicle to surf the web, you may want to think about temporarily parking it and puttering around in something else. That's because the most recent version of Chrome is vulnerable to a devious phishing attack, one that is capable of spoofing a legitimate website in the address bar so that you could be tricked into forking over your login credentials and other sensitive data. This particular variant uses unicode to register domains that look exactly the same as real domains. However, these fake domains can be used for malicious purposes, such... Read more...
Google Chrome is the most dominant desktop web browser on the market, but it isn’t without its critics. While the browser is extremely versatile and generally provides excellent overall performance, those pluses often comes at the expense of higher memory usage and a penchant for chewing through CPU cycles (and memory), which in turn reduces battery life on mobile devices. Google is taking steps to vanquish is power hog demons with the release of Chrome 57. The latest iteration of Chrome was actually released last week, but Google only recently gave us details on what exactly changed with this... Read more...
Mac users that prefer to browse the Internet with Google Chrome (instead of Safari) can now sleep more peacefully at night. Google’s “Safe Browsing” is working to increase its protection of computers running macOS. Google is now focusing more on macOS-specific malware and unwanted software. The most common abuses are unwanted ad injection and manipulation of Chrome user settings. macOS users will start to see more warnings when they navigate to dangerous websites or download questionable files. Developers are able to make sure their users maintain control of Chrome settings through the... Read more...
Gmail is ending support for Chrome browser versions 53 and earlier by the end of the year, Google announced in a blog post. Normally Google would not bother announcing such a thing, but in this case it made an exception because of the impact this could have users who are still clinging to Windows XP and Windows Vista. The last supported version of Chrome on either OS was Chrome 49. "As previously announced in April 2015 and November 2015, these systems are no longer maintained by Microsoft, and we strongly encourage you to migrate to more secure and supported systems," Google said. This announcement... Read more...
It’s been a long time coming, but Google today announced that the iOS version of Chrome has now joined its Chromium open source project. Chrome doesn’t have nearly the same penetration rate on iOS that it does on other platforms, but it provides a safe haven for users that prefer Google services and are partial to Apple hardware. In case you’re not up to speed on the iOS version of Chrome, Apple requires third-party browsers to use the same rendering engine as Safari: Apple’s WebKit. On the other hand, alternate versions of Chrome — available for Windows, macOS, Linux and Android — make use of... Read more...
Despite all the effort Microsoft is expending in getting Internet users to try out and stick with its Edge browser, Chrome continues to the popular choice. Even worse for Microsoft, Chrome's popularity is growing—it now accounts for more than half of all desktop browser usage and has nearly double the market share of Edge and Internet Explorer combined. Market research firm Net Applications has Chrome sitting pretty with a 54.99 percent share of the desktop browser market, up from 31.12 percent at this moment a year ago, while Internet Explorer and Edge combine for 28.39 percent and Firefox stuck... Read more...
You may find it hard to believe that browser makers are still finding ways to make surfing the web faster than it already is, but with so much code underneath the hood combined with the web's growing capabilities, expect to see performance claims for a long time to come. So it goes with Google and its Chrome browser. Starting in Chrome 53, Chrome has started using Microsoft's Profile Guided Optimization (PGO) technology to deliver up to around a 15 percent performance boost in Windows. Here's the thing about Chrome, there are more than a million functions in its source code. Not all of those are... Read more...
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