Items tagged with watch

As the saying goes, it's all over but the shouting and we're sure there are more than a few heated words that are still yet to be exchanged.  Reports are continuing to flow in quickly since Friday, on the news that Walmart was stepping back from the sale of HD DVD players moving forward, offering only Blu-Ray format players by June 2008. With Walmart Senior VP, Gary Severson quoted as saying,  "we've listened to our customers, who are showing a clear preference toward Blu-ray products and movies with their purchases", the writing was on the wall.  With the world's largest retailer officially taking a stance in the other camp, it was easy to see the clock was... Read more...
The entertainment industry is suffering from all sorts of downstream effects from the writer's strike. Companies from coffee shops in Los Angeles to payroll services are feeling the pinch, and some have gone under waiting for everyone to get back to work. But someone has benefited  from it: Online video sites.The on-going writers' strike has meant that many popular programs are currently off-air in the US and, according to Nielsen Online, this has seen Americans turn in large numbers to online alternatives.Its figures show that YouTube's audience was up 18% in the two months after the strike started, and newer video-sharing sites such as Crackle have also experienced unprecedented growth.In... Read more...
The digital grassy knoll set's collective head is about to explode. Apple is collecting iPhone usage data, linked to the user's specific personal information. Apple gathers that personal information when you sign up for an iPhone, and may be doing  something or nothing with it after associating it with your usage data. People's opinions on this seem to depend on the ratio of Apple fanboy to paranoid privacy nut you are. If you're 100% both, this is bad news:From this information, Apple could build a profile on users.  Where they travel, where they spend their free time, where they work, where they invest their money, what they browse, etc etc.  Obviously most users would like to... Read more...
The newspapers are full, every day, of reports of borderline crazy people suing  anybody they can think of for bizarre reasons. Every once in a while, you read  about one, and think: This is just crazy enough to work. How about suing the entire pay TV industry because you are required to pay for channels you don't want or  you can't purchase the service? "The antitrust laws protect the right of choice," antitrust lawyer Maxwell M. Blecher said. "Here the customer is denied that choice." The complex web of contractual arrangements among service providers and networks amounts to a monopoly or cartel that has "deprived consumers of choice, caused them to pay inflated... Read more...
Just kidding. But people in the cell phone world do call Samsung's UpStage music phone the "Mullet Phone," because it has a cell phone in the front, and an MP3 player in the back. Business in the front, party in the back, as they say. And Samsung expects the highly touted Apple iPhone to help sales of their UpStage, not hurt them. Apple's first attempt at an iPod-phone hybrid, the much-derided Motorola Rokr, never took off, and may have turned off potential buyers to the idea of a music phone. That may change with the launch of the impending iPod. If Apple continues its successful iPod marketing strategy, expect a saturation-bombing marketing... Read more...
If you're blind and have been missing out on the joys of Mr. Bean or The Three Stooges, then IBM has something to show you: a new narration technology that reads metadata and tells users what's happening on a compatible video clip. Nyuck-nyuuck! "The tool, which works with Microsoft's Internet Explorer or Mozilla's Firefox Web browser, is designed to handle any file that is embedded in a Web site, including Adobe Flash or Windows Media files. "Just because someone is blind, it doesn't mean they shouldn't be enjoying YouTube or MySpace or anything else like that," said Frances West, director of the Worldwide Accessibility Center for IBM."... Read more...
What would a World Economic Forum in Switzerland be without a discussion of Google paying video uploaders for videos of people doing interesting, humorous, or Darwin-tempting things? Smoke belching factories are so twentieth century. ... analyst Josh Bernoff suspects that YouTube could launch a channel filled with advertiser-friendly videos that have been screened by both audio-fingerprinting technology and Google employees for objectionable or copyrighted content. Advertising revenue could then be shared between Google and the producers whose videos generate significant attention on the channel. "This might be filled with content that is safe... Read more...
At a speech given to the FT World Communications Conference, Google's VP of European operations Nikesh Arora predicted that the ever increasing storage capacity of devices like the iPod is going to allow you to carry around enormous amounts of media. Maybe all the video or audio there is. That's a lot. Arora said, by 2012, iPods could launch at similar prices to those on sale now and yet be capable of holding a whole year's worth of video releases. Around 10 years down the line that could be expanded, creating iPods that can hold all the music ever sold commercially. He said: "In 12 years, why not an iPod that can carry any video ever... Read more...
Because your X-Box has a big hard drive and is likely wired to both your television and the internet already, Microsoft figured they could make some cake selling you downloadable video entertainment for it: Console owners with a broadband Internet connection can download the videos directly to the 20-gigabyte hard drive on the Xbox 360, which already is connected to a television in most homes. The service also stands out because it offers videos in standard-definition and high-definition formats. Xbox chief Peter Moore says that if nothing else, it will help position the 360 as an entertainment device that can appeal to each family member.... Read more...
For the next two years, some of Microsoft's business practices will continue to be closely monitored by the U.S. Government due to antitrust law concerns. Microsoft was supposed to be let off the hook this year, but the investigation has received an extension. "Microsoft had already agreed to the lengthier scrutiny sought by the Justice Department and the attorneys general in 17 states. The company has struggled since 2002 with a key provision in its landmark antitrust settlement requiring it to disclose to its competitors sensitive details about some of its software. Government lawyers said they were prepared to extend oversight of Microsoft's business activities through 2012 if... Read more...
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