Items tagged with Maxwell

There's really no such thing as a 'one-size-fits-all' solution when it comes to computing, and that's especially true for professionals who need varying degrees of graphics performance. For that reason, NVIDIA is now offering a version of its Quadro M6000 graphics card with 24GB of GDDR5 memory, twice as much memory as much as the original model.What does doubling the memory on NVIDIA's flagship workstation graphics card accomplish? Plain and simple, it makes working with the most demanding rendering and simulation intense workloads easier and faster. According to NVIDIA, customers rendering datasets larger than 12GB can experience up to 5X faster performance compared to the previous Quadro M6000.Check... Read more...
Dell's Alienware division has a knack for making a splash with PC system design, whether it's with their big, bad unapologetic notebooks, unique X51 small form-factor PCs, or their no-holds-barred Area-51 killer gaming rigs. In fact, for some folks, Alienware designs can be an either "you love it or hate it" affair. Full disclosure: personally, we tend to be cut from the former affectionate group of performance enthusiasts that generally favor Alienware's outside-the-box design efforts -- and oh boy, Alienware's recent redesign of the Area-51 is way outside the box.   In fact, it's not really even a box at all, it's what Dell's Alienware design team calls a "Triad" design.  With... Read more...
When NVIDIA launched the GeForce GTX Titan X a few weeks back, it did a couple of things. In addition to releasing the fastest single-GPU-powered graphics card we have seen to date, it also created a huge gap in NVIDIA’s desktop GPU line-up. The GeForce GTX 980 can be had for about $530 give or take a few bucks (though that will be changing after today). The GeForce GTX Titan X, however, landed at a cool $1000. That’s a big price gap to leave empty. Consider the Titan X’s massive 12GB of memory and the fact that its GPU leverages all available resources of the GM200 design, and it becomes obvious that a card with less memory and fewer CUDA cores could easily drop in between the GTX 980 and Titan... Read more...
During one of EPIC’s “State Of Unreal Engine” briefing session out at the Game Developer’s Conference, Tim Sweeny talked about the need for more powerful GPU technology to bring us closer to true photo-realistic rendering. At that point in his talk, Sweeny asked if there was anyone in the room that could answer that call, and NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang entered the room carrying a box, concealed within a large jacket.NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang Reveals The GeForce GTX Titan XNIVIDA has their own conference—GTC—happening in about a week’s time, which is where the company usually announces next-gen GPU technology, but Jen-Hsun went ahead and announced a new GPU right in the middle of EPIC’s talk. Out... Read more...
Alienware's new Area 51 gaming desktop PC arrived late last year and it certainly turned heads, including ours, due to its somewhat radical design. Sure, we've seen some wild chassis designs out of Dell's Alienware gaming PC division in the past, but their new, redesigned Area 51 machine really broke the mold. In fact, if you're stuck on the old gray or black box design of most legacy systems, the "Triad" chassis of the new Area 51 may be too much of a departure for you to wrap your head around. We think, with a little investigation into the mechanical engineering and simple physics of the design, however, the intrinsic advantages are plain to see. For starters, the front and rear IO options,... Read more...
To date, NVIDIA has introduced only a couple of Maxwell-based desktop GPUs. Back in September, the company launched the powerful and potent GeForce GTX 980 (and its little brother, the GeForce GTX 970), featuring the GM204. The GM204 is currently NVIDIA’s fastest single-GPU, though a larger “big” Maxwell-based chip akin to the GK110 powering cards like the GeForce GTX Titan, will likely be introduced at some point as well. Looking even further back, we first got a glimpse of Maxwell on the diminutive GeForce GTX 750 Ti. That card was based on the GM107 GPU, a smaller Maxwell variant, that targets low-power and mainstream applications.Today, NVIDIA is going after the sweet spot of the discrete... Read more...
Earlier this month, I had the opportunity to tour Carnival's CSMART facility in Almere, the Netherlands. This facility is one of a handful in the world that can provide both extensive training and certification on cruise ships as well as a comprehensive simulation of what it's like to command one. Simulating the operation of a Carnival cruise ship is anything but simple. Let's start with a ship that's at least passingly familiar to most people -- the RMS Titanic. At roughly 46,000 tons and 882 feet long, she was, briefly, the largest vessel afloat. Compared to a modern cruise ship, however, Titanic was a pipsqueak. Average Modern Day Carnival Cruise Ship, Versus RMS TitanticThis comparison, of... Read more...
The PC laptop market is a funny place. Good laptops are fairly easy to find, but great laptops are staggeringly rare. This is true even at the boutique end of the market, where manufacturers have a tendency to choose powerful components, but cram them into a chassis that can't handle the heat without sounding like a jet turbine, or pick great, quiet hardware but opt for a sub-par 1080p screen whose quality leaves something to be desired. The Asus G751 is not a good laptop. The G751 is a great laptop. It is, in fact, the single best gaming laptop I have ever reviewed. If you're in the market for a system of this type, we hope you read on. This machine is powered by the excellent, Maxwell-based... Read more...
The PC laptop market is a funny place. Good laptops are fairly easy to find, but great laptops are staggeringly rare. This is true even at the boutique end of the market, where manufacturers have a tendency to choose powerful components, but cram them into a chassis that can't handle the heat without sounding like a jet turbine, or pick great, quiet hardware but opt for a sub-par 1080p screen whose quality leaves something to be desired. The Asus G751 is not a good laptop. The G751 is a great laptop. It is, in fact, the single best gaming laptop I have ever reviewed. If you're in the market for a system of this type, we hope you read on. This machine is powered by the excellent,... Read more...
Dell's Alienware division has a knack for making a splash with PC system design, whether it's their big, bad unapologetic notebooks, unique X51 small form-factor PCs, or their no-holds-barred Area-51 killer gaming rigs. In fact, for some folks, Alienware designs can be an either "you love it or hate it" affair. Full disclosure: personally, we tend to be cut from the former affectionate group of performance enthusiasts that generally favor Alienware's outside-the-box design efforts -- and oh boy, Alienware's recent redesign of the Area-51 is way outside the box.   In fact, it's not really even a box at all, it's what Dell's Alienware design team calls a "Triad" design. Alienware Area-51:... Read more...
NVIDIA recently launched mobile variants of their latest Maxwell GPU architecture and we gave you a quick tease to show you what they were all about. Maxwell on the desktop is potent enough. However, the performance and efficiency of NVIDIA's latest GPU architecture would surely play out well in desktop replacement notebooks that cater to gamers and enthusiast who want graphics muscle and aren't afraid of a little extra heft. ASUS quickly saw the benefits of NVIDIA's Maxwell mobile GPU as well and obviously had an early lead in engineering a new gaming notebook that employs NVIDIA's fastest mobile GPU currently, known as the GeForce GTX 980M.  In a revamp of their G750 series of ROG... Read more...
In this latest episode of HotHardware's Two and a Half Geeks, Dave and Marco are sans the half geek, but still go on to discuss Google's Nexus 9 and Nexus 6 announcements, the Digital Storm Bolt II gaming system, NVIDIA's Mobile Maxwell GPUs--the GeForce GTX 980M and 970M, the Dell XPS 18 AIO mobile workstation, Android on x86, some giveaway details and more... Show Notes: 01:10 - Google Nexus 9 By HTC Also Official, NVIDIA Tegra K1 Under The Hood, Android Lollipop Driven 20:24 - Digital Storm Bolt II: Devil’s Canyon Inside 27:19 - Mobile Maxwell: NVIDIA Outs GeForce GTX 980M, 970M 37:17 - Dell XPS 18 Portable All-in-One: Haswell Reloaded 44:06 - Android On Intel x86 Tablet... Read more...
When NVIDIA launched the powerful GTX 980 and 970 last month, it was obvious that these cards would be coming to mobile sooner rather than later. The significant leap forward that Maxwell offers in performance-per-watt means that these GPUs would shine in mobile contexts -- maybe even more than in desktop. The mobile Maxwell die Today, NVIDIA is putting paid to that hypothesis with two new mobile GPUs -- the GeForce GTX 970M and 980M. Both cards are based on Maxwell's 28nm architecture, and both are trimmed slightly from the full desktop implementation. The GeForce GTX 980M is a 1536-core chip (just like the GTX 680 / 680M) while the GTX 970 will pack 1280 cores. Clock speeds are 1038MHz base... Read more...
NVIDIA has lifted the embargo on its latest flagship graphics cards based on their Maxwell GPU architecture, the GeForce GTX 980 and GTX 970. The two cards are somewhat similar and share the same 4GB frame buffer and GM204 GPU, but the GTX 970’s GPU is clocked a bit lower and features fewer active SMs and CUDA cores. The GeForce GTX 980’s GM204 GPU has all of its functional blocks enabled and is the full implementation of the chip, however. NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 980 And GeForce GTX 970 Maxwell Powerhouse GPUs Reviewed When you see the GeForce GTX 980 and GTX 970’s specifications, you may scratch your head a bit and wonder how products with seemingly lower-end specs can replace... Read more...
A few months back, we took a look at the GeForce GTX 750 and GTX 750 Ti, which features a GPU based on NVIDIA’s bleeding-edge Maxwell microarchitecture. Although there have been a few exceptions, when one of the big GPU makers releases a next-gen GPU, they typically start at the high-end and then scale the GPU back to flesh out a top-to-bottom line-up of products, at various price points, leveraging the same core chip architecture. That wasn’t the case with NVIDIA's Maxwell, however. With Maxwell, NVIDIA took a somewhat different approach. The GeForce GTX 750 and GTX 750 Ti are low-power graphics cards targeting mainstream PC users; higher-end GPUs in NVIDIA’s product stack... Read more...
When Nvidia unveiled its new GeForce 800M mobile family a few weeks ago, it talked about a new set of improvements and innovations coming to laptops with through the GeForce Experience program. In the future, applications would have the option to dramatically improve battery life by limiting in-game frame rates as well. Nvidia claims that its upcoming profiles will do more than simply limit a game's frame rate, but it identified that option as one of the most useful ways to squeeze better battery life out of a system while gaming. We decided to test the idea and see just how much of a difference it could make. In this case we used an Alienware 17 laptop equipped with an AMD GPU  (the R9... Read more...
When we evaluated NVIDIA’s Maxwell-based GeForce GTX 750 and 750 Ti a few weeks back, we lauded the GPUs for their competitive performance and class-leading power efficiency. The GeForce GTX 750 and 750 Ti are mainstream products that didn’t tear up the benchmark charts like a bleeding-edge high-end GPU would, but their Maxwell-based GPUs competed well with similarly priced products and they did so at much lower power levels. The power efficiency of NVIDA’s Maxwell architecture make it ideal for mobile applications, so today’s announcement by NVIDIA of a new top-to-bottom line-up of mobile GPUs—most of them featuring the Maxwell architecture—should... Read more...
In this episode of HotHardware's Two And A Half Geeks, Marco, Dave and Iyaz talk about Intel's hot new SSD 730 Series solid state drives, Intel's Ivytown Xeon E7 v2 server processors and Merrifield and Moorefield processors for smartphones, as well as the LG G Flex, hands-on with Samsung's Galaxy S 5, the GeForce GTX 750 Ti and details of our next giveaway where you could win a new custom small form factor gaming PC! Show Notes: 01:45 - Intel SSD 730 Series: Enthusiast Class Storage 05:27 - Intel Announces Ivytown Servers For The Enterprise 07:24 - Intel Debuts Merrifield and Moorefield Designs at MWC 13:09 - NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti Maxwell GPU Review 20:27 - Android Curveball: LG G Flex Review... Read more...
The mid-range graphics card market has seen a lot of action as of late, with an infusion of new products and the discontinuation of popular previous-gen products. Last week it was AMD’s turn to announce a new card—the $150 Radeon R7 265—and with its arrival also came a price cut on the Radeon R7 260X, which can now be had for as low as $129, though the MSRP has been reduced to $119. Today is NVIDIA’s turn to introduce a new mid-range graphics card. But unlike AMD’s re-brand and soft-launch, NVIDIA is at the ready with a brand-new GPU architecture and cards should be hitting store shelves immediately. The new GeForce GTX 750 Ti and GeForce GTX 750 are the first... Read more...
The mid-range graphics card market has seen a lot of action as of late, with an infusion of new products and the discontinuation of popular previous-gen products. Last week it was AMD’s turn to announce a new card—the $150 Radeon R7 265—and with its arrival also came a price cut on the Radeon R7 260X, which can now be had for as low as $129, though the MSRP has been reduced to $119. Today is NVIDIA’s turn to introduce a new mid-range graphics card. But unlike AMD’s re-brand and soft-launch, NVIDIA is at the ready with a brand-new GPU architecture and cards should be hitting store shelves immediately. The new GeForce GTX 750 Ti and GeForce GTX 750 are the first... Read more...
We've known for several years that the next GPU architecture after Kepler would be codenamed Maxwell. NVIDIA revealed as much in a roadmap as far back as September 2010 when Fermi was the top dog, and though it will arrive just a tad behind the GPU maker's original schedule, Maxwell parts are right around the corner. Back in 2010, NVIDIA expected to be pushing out 20nm GPUs by now, though the reality is TSMC isn't up to the task of transitioning to 20nm territory at an acceptable yield. If NVIDIA decided to push the issue, costs would likely jump up dramatically on the manufacturing side, which would result in higher priced graphics cards. With AMD already being so aggressive with its pricing... Read more...
Thanks to yesterday's announcement, we know that NVIDIA will be pushing out Tegra chips annually, or at least that's the plan at this point, but what about GPUs? Like the title says, the next big thing coming down the pipeline according the NVIDIA's CEO Jen-Hsun Huang will come along sometime next year, and it's codenamed Kepler. Kepler will be manufactured using a 28nm process technology and provide users up to four times the double-precision floating point performance per watt of NVIDIA's current-generation Fermi GPU architecture, which is the foundation of the GeForce 400 series. Jen-Hsun Huang states that hundreds of engineers are working on the next generation... Read more...
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