Items tagged with Gadgets

Jawbone expanded its product offerings to include those trademark boxy Bluetooth speaker/speakerphones back in 2010, and now the company is updating the firmware for its JAMBOX and BIG JAMBOX devices in addition to dropping prices on both. You can now snag the JAMBOX (v2.2) for $129.99 and the BIG JAMBOX (v2.0) for $249.99. Updates for the JAMBOX include more crisp and clear phone calls, a Silent Mode in case you need to disable voices and notification sounds, and support for the Jawbone Companion for Android. The BIG JAMBOX also enjoys the new Silent Mode as well as better audio streaming with fewer dropouts once you put distance between the source and the speaker, improved battery life for... Read more...
So far, the tiny and inexpensive Raspberry Pi computer has been about as successful as anyone could have hoped for. More than a million units have been sold so far, there’s a dedicated app store, and hobbyists and developers have been making and porting games and the like. The latest fun consists of a DOS emulator for the Raspberry Pi that enables you to play older PC games such as Duke Nukem 3D, Doom, Little Big Adventure, and more. Coder Patrick Alto based the emulator on one he built for the Nintendo DS, and the latest release offers fixes including better support for USB devices such as keyboards and two-button mice. He further says that the current status of the build is as follows:... Read more...
Rumors (and confirmations) about smartwatches continue to pile up, and the latest scuttlebutt surrounds Google. A “person briefed on the subject” told the Financial Times that Google is indeed working on its own smartwatch, which aligns with suspicions about such a device after a telling Google patent filing last year. It’s notable that unlike Google’s other wearable device, Google Glass, the smartwatch is not being developed by the Project X lab; instead, it’s reportedly under the jurisdiction of the Android folks. The Pebble Smartwatch, i.e., competition That’s perhaps a little disappointing, because if it was a Project X endeavor, the smartwatch would probably... Read more...
Logitech has a new line of gaming mice, keyboards, and headsets called the G series, and the company says it poured “endless hours of rigorous research and development” into the devices. The result is redesigns of four mice and two keyboards as well as a pair of new headsets. The mice include the G700s rechargeable gaming mouse ($99); G500s laser gaming mouse ($69.99); and the G400s ($59.99) and G100s ($39.99) optical gaming mice. Features of the mice include 20-million-click lifespans, multiple programmable controls, and a hydrophobic coating on the palm rest and dry-grip sides for better control. Logitech G700s The G19s ($199.99) and G510s ($119.99) keyboards enjoy the same hydrophobic... Read more...
As the weekend approaches and the itch to tinker with something crawls up the spine of nerds everywhere, open source hardware projects like this one scratch it like nothing else: There’s a card called an Arduino GSM Shield available now, which essentially lets you add GPRS/GSM connections to your projects. In other words, you can build your own unlocked phone with it. The device can be shipped along with Arduino’s Uno, MEGA, and Leonardo boards, and the GSM Shield itself comes with a SIM card. (You can, however, use whatever SIM card you like.) With the shield, you can implement features such as making and receiving phone calls and sending and receiving SMS messages. The shield is... Read more...
In order to relieve the pain of carpal tunnel syndrome, industrial designer Vadim Kibardin of Kibardin Design has created the Bat levitating wireless mouse, which consists of a circular base with a hovering mouse equipped with a magnetic ring. In other words, the power of magnets is the technology that keeps this mouse in the air. For as cool as the industrial design of the all-white (or black, if you prefer) mouse may be, you can imagine a couple of serious engineering problems that the designers will need to solve. First, there’s the issue of a magnet strong enough to keep the mouse airborne when a user is resting his hand on it; further, it might be difficult to keep the mouse from sliding... Read more...
Why, it seems like only yesterday we were posting about the new Google Glass website and its beta-ish program for excited souls who wanted to test out the $1,500 specs themselves. Actually, it was two days ago, but there’s already more information available: according to The Verge and CNET, Google plans to offer Glass at retail stores by year's’ end, and they’ll cost less than the $1,500 price tag we’ve seen attached to them so far. (How far under $1,500 is anyone’s guess; if it turns out to be $1,499.99, we’ll be annoyed.) Considering the recent news that Google is planning to open its own retail locations, one can infer that one of the premier products on... Read more...
When you watch the video of the 3Doodler in action, it looks like a camera trick, but the 3D printing pen is a real thing and is quickly gaining backers on Kickstarter. The device uses 3mm ABS or PLA (corn-based) plastic wire that is heated and cooled as it’s fed through the pen, allowing the user to “write” with the soft, melty plastic that quickly hardens into 3D shapes. There are three basic ways you can use the 3Doodler. You can draw or trace flat shapes on a surface such as paper and then peel it off, build 3D wireframe-type shapes or models, or add some flair to an existing item such as your phone case. The guys behind the project also note that you could use it to patch... Read more...
If you’re one of the lucky folks who managed to get their hands on a very cool Google Nexus 4 before they sold out (or are waiting the 2-3 weeks until Google ships you the Nexus 4 you recently ordered), there’s a wireless charging station you can now purchase, too. The Nexus 4 Wireless Charger is available now on the Google Play Store for $59.99; the product listing says that the device will ship “soon”, in less than a week. There are few details available about the Qi-powered device, but we do know that it’s black, uses inductive charging, and can charge your Nexus 4 in about four hours. The charger is shaped like a ball sliced in half, with a flat part on the bottom.... Read more...
The portable gaming market has been evolving briskly lately, as just a few weeks ago at CES 2013, we got our first hands-on look at both the Razer Edge gaming tablet and NVIDIA’s Project SHIELD mobile gaming device. Now there’s another kid on the block called the Wikipad. The 7-inch tablet is similar to the aforementioned gaming devices in that it’s designed first and foremost for gaming and also has a controller attachment to give a more console-like experience. The Wikipad runs Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich and has a quad-core NVIDIA Tegra 3 processor (with 12-core GPU), 1280x800 (16:10) IPS display that supports 5-point touch input, 1GB of RAM, 16GB of storage (with the... Read more...
CES is chock full of enough new products and technologies to make even the most cynical techie salivate, but as always, there are a handful of items that tend to rise to the top and stand out for being the best products of their kind or for true innovation.  We thought we'd run down a short list of the stand-out products of this year's CES and highlight them here for the HOT hardware that they are. If you’re a gamer, you have to be pumped about this year’s CES. We know that a Steam console is in the works, and we got to feast our eyes on two terrific mobile gaming devices in the Razer Edge and NVIDIA’s Project SHIELD. SHIELD looks like a game controller enabled with a 5-inch... Read more...
Wearable computing is fascinating, both for the many practical challenges designers must solve before a device is functional and convenient and for the wonderful possibilities of it all. Google Glass is definitely currently one of the more high-profile endeavors in that regard, but Microsoft is at it, too. Microsoft Research has been developing Digits, a wrist-mounted device that lets users control devices such as smartphones, tablets, radios, and video game systems using gestures in the air. In addition to creating a 3D representation of a user’s hand on a screen, Digits can control devices when users simulate certain gestures, such as turning a knob to crank volume up or down. The prototype... Read more...
Logitech has dedicated itself to developing one remote to rule them all, as it were, and today the company announced its latest effort, the Logitech Harmony Remote. The device’s premiere feature is the touchscreen nesting in the middle of the remote. Using the bright, 2.4-inch screen, you can add and scroll through up to 50 saved favorite channels (with customizable icons), bring up a number pad, set and sort various activities, and more. Logitech also shrunk the whole unit a bit from the last generation, making it a bit more ergonomical and leaving just the button people use the most. For those who already use the Logitech Harmony One remote, you can easily keep your settings and transfer... Read more...
The Lytro, a curious and innovative light-field camera that lets you focus and adjust images in-camera after you’ve snapped a photo, will be widely available in the U.S. starting on October 9th. In just under two weeks, you can purchase your own giant lipstick-looking Lytro online from Target, Best Buy, and Amazon. In November, they’ll be available at CityTarget stores in L.A., Chicago, San Francisco, Seattle, and Westwood, CA. They’ll also be available online in Canada on October 9th and in store in Australia, Hong Kong, and Singapore later in the month. The cameras are available in several colors, including Red Hot (16GB, $499), Electric Blue (8GB, $399), and Graphite (8GB,... Read more...
If we told you that most eye-controlled computing devices cost as much as $$5,000 or $7,000, would you be surprised? Would you be even more surprised that London scientists have developed a similarly capable device for about thirty bucks using off the shelf parts and a couple of hacked video game consoles? According to CNN, Dr. Aldo Faisal, the lead researcher on the project, was toying with a deconstructed video game console and made an intriguing discovery: "I hacked it and discovered it was very fast and better than any webcam for movement,” he said. “Actually, it was so fast that I found we could record eye movement with it." The way the two-camera device works is that the wearer... Read more...
We don’t cover fashion here very often--OK, never--but sometimes when the tech world crosses over into other industries in interesting ways, it’s certainly worth noting. In this case, it’s the fashion world, where Google Glass spectacles were featured heavily in Diane von Furstenberg’s debut of her “Palazzo” spring 2013 collection. (Now there’s a sentence we never thought we’d write.) It’s actually not all that surprising that Google’s wearable computer glasses could be considered tech chic; they look futuristic (which they should, because technically they are) and cool, like something a stylish Borg might wear. After all, Google could... Read more...
There are a couple of inconveniences of modern connected living that Patriot Memory is trying to address with a product called the Gauntlet Node. One is the problem of storage; the only computer or mobile device we have--and you know that we have quite a few--that isn’t constantly running out of local storage is your big desktop system. Whether it’s due to our packrat-like tendencies, our prolific shutterbugging, our library of music and movies, or the need to maintain secure backups of all of it, file storage is a nagging problem. The Gauntlet Node is a wireless hard drive enclosure that offers a possible solution to both problems; it’s a self-contained portable media server... Read more...
There are a couple of inconveniences of modern connected living that Patriot Memory is trying to address with a product called the Gauntlet Node. One is the problem of storage; the only computer or mobile device we have--and you know that we have quite a few--that isn’t constantly running out of local storage is our big desktop system. Whether it’s due to our packrat-like tendencies (hey, we might need our college geology notes someday, and then who will be laughing at whom?), our prolific shutterbugging, our library of music and movies, or the need to maintain secure backups of all of it, file storage is a nagging problem. Then of course there’s the issue of actually... Read more...
It was only a matter of time before Android found its way onto cameras, and it appears as though that time has arrived. Nikon Rumors got their hands on some leaked product shots that clearly show a new CoolPix model running Android--which confirms what the site already said about the rumored device earlier this month. The CoolPix S800 (or S800c) will likely feature 25-250mm lens, built-in GPS and WiFi, a 3.5-inch display, Android 2.3, and the ability to run Google Play apps. It appears from the photos that there will be at least two different models, and they’ll be available in black or white finishes. As you can see from the images, the front of these devices is unmistakably a camera,... Read more...
LeapFrog makes all manner of edu-tech toys, although its LeapPad is certainly one of the coolest--er, most educational. The next generation of the tablet for tots is the LeapPad2, and it’s now available both directly from LeapFrog and at various brick-and-mortar retailers. Available in both green and pink, the tablet features front- and rear-facing cameras, an LF 2000 processor, 4GB of memory, longer battery life than the original, and a carefully curated library of hundreds of games, ebooks, videos, music, and more. The device starts at $99.99, but you can easily nickel-and-dime yourself out of lots more; the Disney Princess Bundle costs $129.99, downloads are $5 apiece, and game cartridges... Read more...
First off, yes, there are emulators that can run all those classic Atari, NES, SNES, and Sega games, but it’s far more rare to find a small computer that’s been modified to be a console that lets you play those games with an actual system controller. The fellow that writes the petRockBlog decided to do just that when he modded his tiny Raspberry Pi PC to run SNES games. After choosing a stable Linux distribution and emulator to work from, he wrote a script for a launch menu, but he got really creative when it came to making an authentic retro input method. Rather than simply converting a controller to USB, he built an adapter board that allow the user to connect a pair of SNES controller... Read more...
There’s a bright spot or two peeking through the thick black cloud of Samsung’s current legal troubles, and one of them is the Samsung Galaxy Beam, a smartphone that packs a built-in projector. The device is now on sale in the UK for £395 (about $614 USD). The pico projector inside is rated for 15 lumens and purports to project up to a 50-inch image and brings a whole new angle to the concept of sharing with a mobile device. Other specs include a dual-core Cortex A9 (1GHz) processor, 4-inch (480x800) display, 768MB of RAM, 8GB of internal storage (with another 32GB available via the microSD slot), a 5MP autofocus camera with LED flash, and a 2000mAh Li-Ion battery that Samsung... Read more...
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