Items tagged with Chrome

Google has been paying out some significant money to get security researchers and hackers to tear apart its Chrome browser and Chrome OS. In March of 2015, Google offered up $100,000 for anyone who could find an exploit chain that would allow for a persistent compromise of a Chromebox or Chromebook using guest mode via a webpage. That $100,000 offer was an increase from the original $50,000 bounty.That bounty went unclaimed for many months until a researcher that uses the moniker Gzob Qq notified Google on September 18 that he had identified a set of vulnerabilities in Chrome OS. The hacker was... Read more...
Google is all about adding tools to Chrome to prevent annoying things from happening while you surf the web. Chrome already has a bunch of tools to help protect you when you are surfing the web, like telling you when traffic is HTTPS secure, blocking pop-ups, and stopping annoying autoplay videos. In coming versions of Chrome, Google will build in more protections to take the annoyance out of web surfing.Google says that one of the most common bits of feedback it receives are reports of websites redirecting unexpectedly to other places. Google says that it has found that these redirects often come... Read more...
Google is working hard to make the web a more secure place and with its Chrome browser being the most popular browser on the market by most accounts, that was a good place to start. Google says that security has always been one of the core principles of Chrome and points out that it was found to be the most secure browser in two recent studies when looking at multiple aspects of security. Google promised about a year back that it would start marking all websites that aren't encrypted with HTTPS security as "not secure" in Chrome. Google's Emily Schechter, Chrome Security Manager, wrote, "We wanted... Read more...
An increasing number of websites have turned to embedded cryptocurrency mining to generate revenue in place of (or in addition do) ads. One of the problems with this approach is that websites are not always transparent about this. And in other cases, legitimate websites that have been hacked could be running mining software on visitors' PCs without their knowledge. This has gotten the attention of Google, which is considering ways to prevent mining software from running in its Chrome browser. Websites that take this approach use an online JavaScript-based miner called Coin Hive. What this does... Read more...
Microsoft and Google don't have that much love for each other. The two are rivals in the search market with Google being far and away the most popular search engine, leaving Bing with the table scraps. Google also has the most popular mobile operating system forcing Microsoft to admit that its mobile OS is dead. Google also went public with a Windows flaw bask in February that Microsoft was slow to patch, seemingly as a way to shame Redmond into patching the issues. Microsoft is now hitting back at Google with a bit of admonishment for a security issue in the Chrome browser. Reports indicate that... Read more...
It seems like every major OEM wants to get into the high-end notebook space these days, even Google. Typically its Chromebook machines are some of the least expensive notebooks that you can lay your hands on. Take for instance the HP Chromebook X360 convertible, which clocks in in at a very reasonable $300. However, we know that Google is working on a high-end device called the Pixelbook that will push the price of entry up significantly. Some details on the Pixelbook have leaked from electronics retailer Synnex. The listing shows that the Pixelbook will have a display that is 12.3-inches... Read more...
Google is taking another step towards making the web browsing experience a more pleasant one, as it pertains to videos that annoyingly fire up automatically on some sites. Earmarked for a future build of its Chrome browser is the disabling of autoplay for videos that are accompanied by sound, Google announced in Chromium blog post. The idea is to make "autoplay more consistent with user expectations" while giving users more control over audio. The feature update will roll out with Chrome 64. Websites will still be allowed to automatically play videos, but only if the media is not accompanied by... Read more...
Just a couple of weeks ago, we took a look at the [then] forthcoming version 61 of Google's Chrome, which introduces some notable features, including support for a slew of new APIs. Chrome 61 is now available in the release channel; if you're using Chrome right now, chances are you can update simply by restarting your browser. The exact version out today is 61.0.3163.79, and it's available for Windows, Linux, and macOS. It's really hard to weigh one of the updated features over another, as what's more useful really depends on your usage case. But one of Google's outed feature is new JavaScript... Read more...
If you’re a heavy user of the Chrome internet browser, and you most likely are, then Google has some changes in the works that will make your daily travails less nerve racking. There are few things more annoying on the internet than websites that autoplay videos — be it original content from the site itself or advertisements — that blast audio upon loading the page. Google previously tackled this problem by flagging the tab of an offending website with a speaker icon. This allowed you to quickly spot which site/tab was causing all the ruckus, and either close it down or hit the pause button on... Read more...
The latest beta version of Chrome, version 61, has just dropped, and it brings with it a healthy collection of enhancements and new features. This beta is relevant seemingly for every platform it's regularly offered for, except iOS. Android, Mac, Linux, Chrome OS, and of course Windows are all taken care of with this update. Arguably, the most notable addition to Chrome 61 is support for the Payment Request API, which will let websites send a payment request to the browser (securely), allowing people to pay via Android Pay on the desktop. Ultimately, when a wide rollout happens, it means that buying... Read more...
Most PCs may run some variant of Microsoft Windows operating system, but Google's Chrome browser still rules the internet browser roost. According to various studies conducted by StatCounter and NetMarketShare, Chrome tightly holds onto nearly 60% of the market share. Microsoft Edge, however, barely claimed a 5% share, despite the fact that 91% of PCs are running a Windows OS of some version.  Chrome enjoyed dominance this past year throughout all regions and over various device categories. StatCounter claims that Google Chrome enjoys a 53.91% total share, while NetMarketShare argues... Read more...
It’s been eight years in the making, but Mozilla is now rolling out multiprocess support to its production branch of Firefox via the Electrolysis (E10s) project. Firefox 54 is being billed as “the best Firefox ever” and uses its multiprocess support to enable web users, who often have a dozen (or dozens of) tabs open at a time, to enjoy a faster and more stable browsing experience. In the case of Firefox 54, E10s spreads all open tabs across up to four open processes. This allows Firefox 54 to make better use of system resources, and in the event that one rogue tab causes issues that could hamper... Read more...
Are you still partying like it's 1999 on a 32-bit browser? Pshaw! To borrow a line for Weird Al Yankovic, "What kinda chip you got in there, a Dorito?" Well, Google is having none of it. Users running Chrome on a 64-bit Windows system with at least 4GB of RAM installed will be migrated from 32-bit to 64-bit, so long as they have Chrome configured to automatically update itself. The migration will take place with Chrome 58, which Google has already started to dole out. if a user wants to go back to using the 32-bit build for any reason, it will still be available to download (manually). However,... Read more...
If you're using Google's Chrome browser as your primary vehicle to surf the web, you may want to think about temporarily parking it and puttering around in something else. That's because the most recent version of Chrome is vulnerable to a devious phishing attack, one that is capable of spoofing a legitimate website in the address bar so that you could be tricked into forking over your login credentials and other sensitive data. This particular variant uses unicode to register domains that look exactly the same as real domains. However, these fake domains can be used for malicious purposes, such... Read more...
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