Items tagged with can

Sony's powerful gaming console with the semi-lackluster sales, the Playstation 3, is being upgraded to include an 80 gigabyte hard-drive in South Korea. It's currently being offered with a 60 gigabyte drive. It's unclear whether that means the more powerful offering is destined to be offered elsewhere anytime soon. "Increasing capacity for models is one of the options," said Satoshi Fukuoka, spokesman for Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. "We make such decisions depending on the needs of the market, and every country is different." The 80-gigabyte version will start selling June 16 in South Korea, where online games are enormously popular and broadband connections are more... Read more...
Google has all sorts of variations on its old standby search engine. They've combined parts of two of their lesser known searches into one new widget: Google Hot Trends. It's a list of the 100 top search trends, and you can tweak it to compare trends and peg it to different moments in time. I put in  a search term for a business I'm familiar with and it returned a list of articles, a search summary over a period of several years, and a listing of searches by geographic area which corresponded closely to  my own experience. In short, it's kinda handy. And a bit terrifying, when you see how mundane most of the top searche trends are. "There are events going on all the time that most... Read more...
We're toying around in the lab with some "new things" right now, one of which is Corsair's new DDR3 modules.  Have a look-see... Corsair DDR3 Memory These are very early engineering samples rated for 1066MHz but they do 1333 just fine.  Also the timings on them are a bit high for our liking but we're told tighter 1333MHz rated parts are on the way.  At CL6 or 5, 1333MHz DDR3 is going to be pretty snappy. Stick around... More good things to come in the days ahead!... Read more...
You've got your CEO, CFO, Division Managers and so forth. CIO came with the importance of electronic communications and the internet. But now we add another title to the alphabet soup of corporate management: CSO, or Chief Security Officer. Research from the Economist Intelligence Unit shows the number of CSOs taking ultimate responsibility for the security of a business has almost doubled year-on-year. Although the CIO still has sign-off on security decisions in 30 per cent of organisations, 12 per cent of respondents said they now have a CSO who assumes that responsibility. This is up from seven per cent last year. Denis McCauley, director... Read more...
AMD is working hard on bringing together two of their next generation technologies: Fusion and Torrenza. It's been long since thought that Fusion, a GPU that can share room on die with the main CPU, would do well in a laptop platform. So what is chief rival, Intel, doing? Making their own standard, of course! "While Torrenza is well on its way to seeing daylight, Intel is also working on its own open architecture platform. Notorious for keeping its CPU platform a closely guarded technology, Intel indicated that it was working on a competitive technology to AMD's HyperTransport, dubbed CSI, allowing direct CPU and memory access."... Read more...
According to researchers, a simple formula calculated by a computer could be more effective then asking loved ones whether or not to 'pull the plug'. The program predicted the wishes of a patient accurately 78% of the time where as surrogates only made accurate decisions 68% of the time. Besides being more accurate then a surrogate, researches also claim the program will also preserve ethics. If the idea of a computer choosing whether you live or die gives you the creeps, advanced directives remain your best bet for specifying your future medical decisions, but very few people ever fill one out. A simple formula can predict how people... Read more...
Here's some good news for laptop users and/or anyone willing to mount laptop drives in their desktops: SanDisk's 32GB 2.5" is not going to ship at $500 per drive as earlier reports suggested. How much would you pay? $600? $700? $1000!?! No way! SanDisk is saying the drives will only cost $350. Sure the drive is a little short in the capacity arena but so was the original Raptor. Putting a few of these bad boys in Raid 0 might be a lot safer than traditional drives because of their lack of moving parts, just don't salivate on the drives. "The 32GB, 2.5-inch SanDisk SSD is available now to computer manufacturers, with initial pricing... Read more...
A Playstation 3 isn't cheap to buy. But your friends down at HotHardware thought we'd research what it costs to run it, too. We visited Sust-It, a website that helps people choose energy efficient appliances in Great Britain. A Playstation 3 uses 380 watts of power while it's running! That's more than twice the power consumption on an X-Box 360. It's 22 times the power consumption of Nintendo's Wii. It's about the same as a frost-free refrigerator. The stated yearly cost of 47.69 Pounds translates to $92.14 per year for electricity. I've been told that many people also hook these device up to television sets. These may require power as well; further research is... Read more...
VIA Shows How Clean Computing Can Halve Power Use at the Green California Exposition Power efficient and carbon free processor platforms enable up to 50% power saving in computing devices for institutions and businesses Taipei, Taiwan, March 12, 2007 - VIA Technologies, Inc, a leading innovator and developer of silicon chip technologies and PC platform solutions, will showcase a range of highly power efficient partner products for enterprise at the Green California Summit and Exposition taking place in Sacramento, California from 13-14 March 2007, booth 1030. The environment-conscious PCs, thin clients, storage and ultra mobile partner products on display are designed to enable organizations... Read more...
Thankfully the collaboration between Ford Motor Company and Microsoft is only for the entertainment system- "Initially to be made available in twelve 2008 models across the Ford family and across the entire 2009 lineup from FoMoCo, the service will be a fully-integrated, flash memory-based system that enables drivers to call hands-free and to control a range of digital audio via voice commands and buttons mounted on the steering wheel. The system is based on an a Microsoft Auto operating system comprising an ARM 11 processor, 64MB of DRAM and 256MB of flash memory. Microsoft tells us that its software will be updatable, probably via the USB port." It does appear to have some really hot features... Read more...
PC World has a list of 62 people they call: The Fifty Most Important People On The Web. So who's making the biggest impact online? We considered hundreds of the Web's most noteworthy power brokers, bloggers, brainiacs, and entrepreneurs to figure out whose contributions are shaping the way we use the Web. We whittled the list down to the top 50--well, actually the top 62--people, but as you'll see, there are some you just can't separate. And don't despair: Get a little more traffic on your Web site, and you may show up on the list next year. This should cause alot of arguement's about weather... Read more...
Microsoft recently shipped a new version of Windows so its time for some industry analysts to map out the plan for Microsoft's eventual decline and Apple's surge back to predominance after roughly two decades in niche-ville. Interesting reading... "In 2000, Microsoft Windows was still a poor product, but it had replaced DOS on hundreds of millions of PCs, and was strong competition to the ten year old operating system that Apple was still trying to sell. When Windows 2000 shipped, Apple's efforts to sell Mac OS 9 and its delayed attempts to deliver Mac OS X similarly appeared laughably behind the times. It was Microsoft that wasn't... Read more...
Computerworld answers the age-old question: -If train A leaves the station at 8:00 am using a pencil and a phone -And train B comes in late and reads Fark and texts on a Blackberry and has a Palm and a cellphone and two monitors going with multiple RSS feeds Which one makes your stock options rise above junk-bond status? If you look across e-mail and social networks, database and phone, the surprise was that overall, IT use is not associated with an increase in speed. In fact, it's associated with slower speed. But we found that heavier IT users are much heavier multitaskers, so over time, they're completing more projects and bringing in more money for the firm. The answer: It's... Read more...
IT staffing is expected to be flat in 2007. Computerworld has a rundown of the five Mad Skillz an IT jobseeker should expect to be grilled about in their job interview: IT hiring figures are expected to dip slightly in the coming year, so you'll be getting a flood of résumés for every job opening you have. From those, hiring executives will pluck people with the strongest combination of technical and business skills. For instance, knowing how to help a call center agent navigate malfunctioning pop-up screens will no longer be enough. Instead, DHL and other big companies want tech support staffs to prioritize and understand why jumping on a problem quickly is a mission-critical must. Hot... Read more...
Are advances in camera phone picture quality and data transfer going to make digital cameras redundant for most people soon? "With camera phones and their flashes becoming increasingly powerful the phone makers have realised they have to migrate functions such as red-eye reduction onto their phones," Zarakov told ENN. "The volumes are huge. Compare around 80 million or 90 million digital cameras sold in 2006 to 500 million camera phones." The firm, which specialises in communications technology for the digital camera industry, claims its new MTP-IP connectivity solution (Media Transfer Protocol-Internet Protocol) is 10 times faster than existing Bluetooth technology, and can transfer a 3 megapixel... Read more...
IBM plans to place DRAM (dynamic random access memory) circuits right in their microprocessors starting next year. It's not a breakthrough, just a tweak. Soon you'll be able to eDRAM those Cacodemons and spreadsheets. Until now, IBM, Intel (NasdaqGS:INTC - News) and nearly all chipmakers used synchronous RAM, another type of memory. SRAM is faster that DRAM, but it has some limitations. As chips get smaller, chipmakers need something to replace SRAMs as on-chip memory. The solution, says IBM, is eDRAM. It is one-third the size of SRAM and uses one-fifth the power in standby mode of regular SRAM.... Read more...
Princeton has agreed to let Google digitize about 1 million public domain books which are no longer in copyright, into the enormous database that is Google Books. The project started two years ago, and aims to digitize many of the worlds books, allowing them to be searchable over the web. "The Web search leader said on Monday Princeton had agreed to work with it to digitize about 1 million public domain books -- works no longer covered by copyright protections. The combined collections of the university's libraries total more than 6 million printed works, 5 million manuscripts and 2 million nonprint items. A Google spokeswoman said her... Read more...
Wal*Mart is starting their own online video download service today. They'll be offering movies and TV shows for a little less, generally, than Apple's similar iTunes service. Unlike some offerings, Wal-Mart will not rent films online. The films can be played on a PC or transferred to Microsoft Windows Media-compatible portable digital players. The movies will not play on Apple computers or the popular iPod. Movies bought from the Wal-Mart store also can't be burned onto a DVD, although the company said it hopes to offer the option by the end of the year. Wal-Mart says it doesn't expect digital sales to cannibalize its retail DVD business... Read more...
Mozilla, the company that brings you the internet browser Firefox, has targeted China as a big opportunity to preach its open source sermon. They've decided to open an office in Beijing. China's the second largest pool of internet users in the world, after the US. In China, stricter government rules on piracy and expensive software licences might encourage more consumers to turn to open-source technology, industry watchers say. Ever keen to develop home-grown technology, Beijing is also working on its own computer operating system and third-generation wireless standard, as well as its answer to the open-source movement -- state-backed... Read more...
Phishing scams are all the rage these days. And as the scammers get more sophisticated, it's not just noobs who get their info and their money stolen. E*Bay's subsidiary PayPal is preparing to offer a key fob for its users to make stealing your info only half the battle. PayPal's use of key fobs represents what is called two-factor authentication, a login system in which an additional form of device-oriented verification is used in addition to a conventional password. Two-factor authentication is advantageous because it prevents a user's account from being stolen when one of the two authentication forms is compromised.... Read more...
Ford's getting its brains beat in by foreign manufacturers. They forgot to keep up with the times. Well, the times are telling them that the CD is becoming as obsolete as cassettes for audio entertainment while you're driving. Ford and Microsoft figure you'd bring your own music to your rolling party, if they just let you plug it in: The "Sync" system being unveiled today at the North American International Auto Show connects popular iPods and all other digital music players - including Microsoft's nascent Zune - to in-dash software through a USB port. Drivers will be able to pick songs, artists or genres using voice activation... Read more...
Jimmy Wales, founder of the immensely popular Wikipedia, has decided to build a rival search engine to compete with Google. He calls his new search engine Wikiasari. Like Wikipedia, the new search engine will rely on the support of a volunteer community of users. The idea is that Web surfers and programmers will be able to bring their collective intelligence to bear, to fine-tune search results and make the experience more effective for everyone. "If you search in Google, a lot of the results are very, very good and a lot of the results are very, very bad," says Wales. What that shows, Wales says, is that mathematical formulas alone do not produce... Read more...
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