Items tagged with Amazon.com

Those who may be in the midst of their Amazon.com stock after the introduction of the iPad, may want to pause and think for a second. While many forecast the Kindle's demise, more important than a Kindle sale for Amazon.com are sales of its e-books.After all, as with printers, it's all about the consumables. You may only sell one Kindle, but you could sell tens of e-books to one consumer. In response to the iPad's introduction, Amazon.com said the following:Customers can read and sync their Kindle books on the iPhone, iPod Touch, PCs, and soon BlackBerry, Mac, and iPad. Kindle is purpose-built for reading. Weighing in at less than 0.64 pounds, Kindle fits comfortably in one hand for hours, has... Read more...
Anything that can be hacked will be hacked, and virtually everything can be hacked. Thus, we see that latest escapade in the land of hacking. The Kindle's DRM (digital rights management, copy protection) has been compromised.Amazon sells content for the Kindle in a proprietary format, .azw.  It contains DRM to prevent users from transferring copyrighted content to other devices.  Think of it as the e-book version of what Apple's FairPlay DRM used to represent.The hack lets users convert the Kindle's e-books into PDF files, allowing them to be read on any number of non-Amazon e-book readers as well as computers, naturally. The hacker, known only as Labba, posed a challenge on a hacker... Read more...
This will probably raise red flags across the publishing industry, but it is certainly a coup for Amazon.com and its Kindle e-book reader. Steven Covey is Amazon.com's 13th-highest top-selling author overall, and Amazon.com now has "electronic exclusivity" to two of his best-sellers.The e-book versions of Stephen Covey's bestselling books, "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People" and "Principle-Centered Leadership," are now available exclusively (for a year) in the Amazon Kindle Store. They are both available for $7.99.In doing so, Covey has moved the rights of the electronic versions of those books from his traditional publisher, Simon & Shuster, to RosettaBooks. The move is bound to be... Read more...
Intel on Tuesday introduced a new e-book reader, one designed for the visually impaired, which can read digital files of books aloud, as well as capture images from printed material via a 5-megapixel digital camera and similarly read the text aloud at a variety of listening speeds. Additionally, the Intel Reader, as its called, has a 4" display that will show the text in large fonts, for those impaired, and not blind. The $1,499 device may seem expensive when compared to the Kindle 2, which can also read aloud, though in a robotic voice, but this new device is designed specifically as a reader for the visually impaired, as opposed to a consumer device. In fact, you may recall that the Kindle... Read more...
Barnes & Noble's nook hasn't even seen the light of day yet (it's pre-order only), and it's already embroiled in a lawsuit. In this case, Spring Design, which has its own e-book reader, is claiming B&N has used IP garnered from meetings with Spring Design in its nook.The lawsuit addresses Spring Design's "Alex" e-book reader, which features two e-ink displays with capacitive touchscreens as well as the Google Android operating systems. This is all very similar to the nook.Spring Design claims in their press release that they and Barnes and Noble had been meeting since the beginning of this year, with B&N noting very favorable impressions of the device.  It seemed there was a... Read more...
Amazon.com has announced its own house brand of electronics. The new brand, called "AmazonBasics," is, according to the giant Internet retailer, a new private-label collection of consumer electronic "basics" created for customers who want "exceptional value." In other words, basic low-priced electronics goods, which for now appears to be limited to blank media such as blank DVDs or CDs, and cables. The selection for now is extremely limited, but one nice perk for green buyers is that all AmazonBasics products will come in Amazon's Frustration-Free packaging. Although, as I said, the selection is limited for now, expect Amazon.com to expand its private label items, perhaps even past electronics.... Read more...
Amazon.com, which took the Orwellian step of remotely deleting copies of "1984" and "Animal Farm" from customers' Kindles, has apologized. On Thursday, they announced a sort of "reparations program" for those customers. In an email sent to "former owners" of the e-books, Amazon.com offered to either return the deleted books to effected Kindles, or to give owners a $30 Amazon gift certificate. It's unclear if this was prompted by the lawsuit over the deletions. The lawsuit was filed by a student who said that the deletion rendered useless the notes he had taken for a school assignment and put into his Kindle. Naturally, of course, Amazon.com denied any connection between the two. Here's the full... Read more...
It's not the first time an e-tailer has outed a product early. It won't be the last. It appears that Amazon.com's German site has listed a 250GB version of the Xbox 360 Elite. It's a good time to be a gamer, eh? First the PS3 "Slim" and a $100 price reduction, then the corresponding $100 price drop for the Xbox 360 Elite, and now a 250GB Xbox Elite version? The listing is a package deal, including Forza Motorsport 3 for EUR 279.99 or about $402. Since Microsoft's announcement of the Xbox 360 price cut includes a note that implies the Pro version will be discontinued, perhaps the current Elite will become Pro, and the 250GB version (assuming it's for real) will become the new Elite. Guess we'll... Read more...
Shoot, when we were kids, the best we could get away with in terms of something similar to this was "the dog ate my homework." In this case, a lawsuit has been filed after the well-publicized e-book deletion fiasco that ending up remotely deleting legitimately purchased e-books from users' Kindles. A 17-year-old from Michigan, Justin D. Gawronski, filed suit in a Seattle court along with California resident Antoine J. Bruguier. They are are seeking class action status. While Amazon.com refunded the charges for the deleted e-books, the suit isn't about money, so much. Gawronski was using the e-book for a summer advanced placement class. When Amazon.com deleted the book "1984" from his Kindle,... Read more...
Another day, another PR mess for Amazon.com.  Just as they seem to have settled the row over cracked Kindles (although the lawsuit continues!), users awoke Friday morning to find e-books remotely deleted from their Kindles, and the PR storm started up all over again.The Big Brother-ishness of the deletions was only heightened by the fact that the books in question were by George Orwell: "Animal Farm" and yes, "1984." Amazon.com did refund people's money, but it brought the wrath of not just end users, but the Electronic Frontier Foundation upon Amazon.com. The EFF said: If people want books that won't evaporate on the orders of faceless bureaucrats, if they want their libraries to last,... Read more...
People usually buy cases to protect their technology. In this case, the $30 case Amazon.com has been selling as a Kindle 2 accessory has apparently been causing cracks in the Kindle where the case clips to it, that eventually cracks the screen. Not good, and also not good that it took a lawsuit to prompt Amazon.com to offer replacements without a $200 charge.Previously, Amazon.com had asked users to pay $200, because the problem wasn't covered under Amazon's limited warranty. That led to a $5 million class action lawsuit by Matthew Geise, who experienced the problem with his wife's Kindle 2. Atta boy, Matt... A look at the one-star reviews for the case at Amazon.com's own site shows not just... Read more...
According to a report in the New York Times, Google has its sights trained squarely on the e-book market. This move would pit Google against Amazon.com, which has a big head start in the e-book market with the versions it sells for its Kindle device (pictured below). The report stated that Google had discussions with publishers at the annual BookExpo convention in New York over the weekend. Publishers might be happier with Google's pricing structure than with Amazon.com's. Amazon allows publishers set wholesale prices but then sets its own prices for consumers. Amazon sells Kindle editions of most new best sellers for $9.99, far lower than the typical $20+ at which publishers sell new hardcovers.... Read more...
We've previously written about the so-called "Amazon Tax," New York State's move to expand the definition of a physical presence in a state so as to be able to force a retailer to charge sales tax. WEe also wrote that this was just the beginning, and as we expected, things are accelerating. As many states face budget crises, they are looking for as many ways to increase revenue that they can. The sales tax some states feel is lost on Internet sales, which, in the past, would not be taxable if the retailer did not have a brick-and-mortar physical presence in a state would be welcomed. New York State's "Amazon Tax," expands the definition of physical presence by adding the presence of an affiliate... Read more...
The Reading Rights Coalition, an advocacy group that represents the blind as well as disabled readers, held a protest outside the offices of The Authors Guild on Tuesday. The organization hopes to get the Guild to reverse its stance on the Kindle 2's "Read-to-Me" functionality. The Authors Guild earlier placed a lot of pressure on Amazon.com over the Kindle 2's "Read-to-Me" feature, which it claimed infringed on the rights of authors by providing a unauthorized audiobook version of a book on the device. Amazon.com eventually caved into their demands. "Read-to-Me" is a text-to-speech feature, but a voice expert said (and an example below clearly indicates) that the feature is no threat to audiobooks.... Read more...
It's not exactly the type of price match people think of when they hear the words "price match," and it sure wasn't something we had expected so soon, but it's here. Amazon MP3 has price-matched iTunes, so to speak.  On the same day that Apple rolled out variable, tiered pricing on iTunes, Amazon MP3 did the same. Take a look at the Best Sellers list, for example. You'll see MP3s priced at $0.79, $0.89, $0.99, $1.29. You can see some of the page above . While you may have hoped Amazon MP3 would have maintained its pricing structure at $0.99 for everything, Amazon was probably pressured by the labels, who have more bargaining power now that iTunes has caved.... Read more...
Amazon.com has halted sales of a Japanese video game that simulated the rape of a mother and her two daughters. The Rapelay game had been offered, not directly by Amazon.com, but rather through its third-party Amazon Marketplace service. The seller specializes in "hentai" — sexually explicit anime and manga. The description of the game, obtained before it was removed, is: Rapelay is an offshoot of the Illusion series, Interact Play. You, like in previous installments, play as a public nuisance that gets away from captivity and starts scouting for new targets. This time around you find a family of a single mother and her two daughters. You quickly begin your hunt and capture each woman one by... Read more...
We're already aware that on Monday Amazon.com will most likely be announcing Kindle 2. But will they also be announcing software for smartphones that will allow users to download, buy, and read Kindle books? The New York Times says that Amazon.com has confirmed that they are working on such software. According to Drew Herdener, a spokesman for Amazon: "We are excited to make Kindle books available on a range of mobile phones. We are working on that now." Obviously they'd be looking at iPhone, Android, Windows Mobile, and Blackberry. I'd assume iPhone was a given, though as with any app destined for the App Store, it might be delayed by the approval process. Does this mean Amazon.com is giving... Read more...
The days of sales tax-free purchases on the Internet edged closer to an end on Monday, as a New York court dismissed the lawsuits which had been filed by Overstock.com and Amazon.com over the so-called "Amazon Tax." New York enacted this tax on Internet retailers that have affiliates based in the state. Previously, only retailers with a "physical presence" in the state were required to collect sales tax. New York changed its law to say that having an affiliate (meaning, a site like this one that has Amazon.com ads and gets revenue from click-thrus) constitutes a physical presence. Overstock.com eliminated any New York affiliates, but still filed suit. Amazon's argument was three-fold: The statute... Read more...
Digital photo frames are a hot gift item these days, but anyone buying a Samsung SPF-85H 8-inch digital photo frame through Amazon.com this year may have given their loved ones a little something extra: A computer virus.Amazon reached out to its purchasers with a note just before the holiday.Here's a snippet of their warning to customers: The alert concerns discovery of the W32.Sality.AE worm on the installation disc SAMSUNG FRAME MANAGER XP VERSION 1.08, which is needed for using the SPF-85H as a USB monitor. If you are using Vista or a different version of Frame Manager, this issue does not affect you. It goes on with step-by-step instructions on what to do if you are affected. Basically, users... Read more...
Yes, Sony has declared a war on the clamshell, packaging that is. We wrote earlier about Amazon.com's "frustration-free packaging" initiative, and this is an example of a similar initiative, aimed at getting rid of those clamshell packages that seem almost lethal. We call them lethal because (and I know you've experienced this if you've opened up any of these packages) those edges can be as sharp as a knife when you try to cut or pry them open. But while Amazon.com has no brick-and-mortar operations to worry about, Sony does have to be concerned with security. I suppose a thief whose hand is bleeding is more obvious to security guards, but still. Sony has released a video that reveals the incident... Read more...
Despite dire predictions for this year's holiday season, Black Friday results for online retailers showed a 1% increase from last year's Black Friday sales, to $534 million, according to a report by market research firm comScore. All is not rosy in the stats, however; comScore noted that for the holiday season to date e-commerce was down 4% from last year. Overall, retailers showed $10.6 billion in sales, up 3%, according to a preliminary report by ShopperTrak. The question is: how much money are they making off these sales. Brick-and-mortar stores are attracting customers through the use of bargain prices, and that's possibly what's attracting online buyers as well. According to a statement... Read more...
When Amazon.com opened its software download service in early January, it seemed curious that they would create a downloader app if they didn't have something larger in mind. A job posting on Gamasutra suggests Amazon will soon start a PC game download store to compliment Unbox, its video-on-demand service, and the site's MP3 download store. The job posting asks programmer/engineers to apply to become a part of the Software and Video Games Digital Technology Team at Amazon, which is "responsible for digital distribution of software and video game products from the Amazon website, including the newly launched Amazon Software Download store."This is precisely what we have anticipated, though not... Read more...
Prev 1 2 3 Next