Items tagged with Amazon.com

Apple has sold 2.8 million Apple Watches in the U.S. since putting their fancy-schmancy smartwatch on the market just two months ago, this according to the e-mail receipt tracking company Slice. The company's report also says that 17% of those buying the wrist adornment are shelling out for an extra watch band, too, giving the Cupertino timepiece producer a nice double-dip into the cash reserves of their beloved customers. The sales figures for Apple Watch are said to put the timekeeping device at the definitive forefront of the smartwatch market, well ahead of Samsung (which sold 1.2 million smartwatches over the entire course of 2014), Pebble (which reached the... Read more...
When you think Amazon, you probably imagine books and freaky fast shipping. You probably don't think about drones and robots, both of which have crept into the company's fabric over the past year or so. In addition to preparing a Prime Air service which would (in theory) drop packages to your front door, the company has just rolled out its eighth-generation fulfillment center which relies on "robotics, vision systems, and high-end technology to speed up order delivery times for customers."Specifically, one of the stars is Kiva. Kiva is strolling around in 10 of these new centers across the United States, moving crates and generally making life easier for humans and faster for those ordering.... Read more...
The highly anticipated Amazon.com tablet will emulate something from the HP TouchPad, according to a recent report. No, it won't use HP's webOS platform, instead opting for Google's Android, but it will sell for hundreds less than Apple's $499 entry-level iPad, according to a source, speaking to the New York Post. It wasn't until the price of HP's TouchPad was dropped from $399 for 16GB (it began life at $499) to $99 that the webOS tablet became popular. Of course, HP only lowered the price to that extent because it had pulled the plug on webOS hardware development, not because it wanted to sell the tablet at that price. In fact, HP was losing a lot of money on those tablets. A teardown analysis... Read more...
Amazon.com is using California's initiative process to try to get a law requiring Amazon.com to collect sales tax in the state repealed, and as part of its process, the company is campaigning in front of physical storefronts. As part of its attempt to repeal the law, Amazon must gather over 500,000 signatures in order for a Proposition to be put on the ballot.  In what must be seen as a truly ironic move, (and probably frustrating and annoying for brick-and-mortar stores that must collect sales tax), signature gatherers are using planting themselves in front of high-traffic retail areas.  Naturally, quite a few of these retailers have lost sales to Amazon. Bill Whalen,... Read more...
Users might recall that the June 27, 2011 "Free App of the Day" at Amazon's Appstore was Pocket Casts. On the day it was free, 101,491 copies were "sold." Amazon said when it launched the Appstore that on the day an app was offered for free, the developers would still get 20 percent of the value. Well, according to the developers of Pocket Casts, Shifty Jelly, Amazon has changed the rules. Instead of 20 percent, as Amazon originally promised, developers whose apps are featured for free get exactly zero percent. Apparently, Amazon feels the "advertising" and attention a free app gets is worth the cost to the developer. So, did Pocket Casts see more sales than normal after the big free day?... Read more...
On Monday, Amazon.com announced a program that might help students defray their textbook costs: Kindle Textbook Rental.  According to Amazon.com, students can save as much as 80 percent off the purchase price of a textbook. The rental can be as short as 30 days, or as long as 360, and the rental period can easily be extended in increments as small as one day. The renter can also choose to purchase the book they are renting at any time, if they so desire. Those who have used a Kindle know that users can make comments and annotations in a Kindle e-book; in the case of a rental textbook, those annotations will be stored in a user's account and restored if the customer ever rents the book... Read more...
A few weeks ago, Amazon.com dropped associates in California due to a new sales tax law. Needless to say, this action made many loyal Amazon users and sellers unhappy. Many people blamed the state of California while others placed blame on Amazon. Regardless of which party you chose to blame, the fact is, the accounts for Amazon associates in California have been terminated. Now, Amazon.com is seeking a ballot initiative that could repeal the California law that requires online retailers such as Amazon to collect sales tax. The California attorney general's office received a petition on Friday. Next, the attorney general's office will prepare a title and summary for the initiative. The initiative... Read more...
Faster than an Amazon Associate could blink, Amazon.com sent out notices on Wednesday, telling Associates that due to California's new budget, which includes a new sales tax on Amazon.com purchases, their accounts would be terminated, IF the sales tax was signed into law (which it has). The state of California is following the example of many other states, passing an "Amazon Tax." In 1992, the Supreme Court ruled in Quill vs. North Dakota that unless a retailer had a "physical presence" in a state, it could no be required to collect sales tax on purchases made in that state. Amazon.com does not have a warehouse or any other physical location, but what Californian and other states have done is... Read more...
The days of saying "the Amazon Appstore requires sideloading and thus can't be used on AT&T phones" may be ending. AT&T is reportedly beginning to push out updates to some older devices to enable sideloading functionality on them. Sideloading is a term that means the ability to install builds from non-Android Market sources. That could be another store like the Amazon Appstore, or it could be an APK file on an SD card. To enable it, you need to go into the device settings, and allow "Unknown Sources" to install. Unfortunately, AT&T, in its misguided wisdom, saw fit to remove the setting. Once the Amazon Appstore launched, it seemed inevitable that AT&T would cave. The updates... Read more...
If you're wondering if the paid apps turned free that Amazon.com distributes every day in its Amazon Appstore are getting much uptake, the answer is yes. How do we know? Via Appbrain's daily hot list of apps. Appbrain, which used to be the only way to browse the Android Market via the Web before Google opened its Android Market on the web at market.android.com, still has a number of nice features, including being able to see what the hot apps are for the day, and for the week. Inevitably, the app that Amazon.com makes free, ends up at the top of the list. For example, on Sunday, May 15, Amazon.com made Guns'n'Glory its free app. Where was it in Appbrain's daily hot list by mid-evening Sunday... Read more...
The fact, or at least poorly hidden rumor, that Amazon.com is going to unveil an Android tablet "sometime," and probably sooner, rather than later. That's pretty exciting to many. How would you feel if you were to learn that the company is planning a line of Android tablets? That's what a tipster has told Android and Me. The source is apparently an "industry insider with direct knowledge of the project." Reportedly, Amazon.com is working on a series of devices, with a few different-sized tablets as well as Amazon.com smartphone. While the tipster didn't allude to any specific sized, A&M speculated that there would be a smartphone in the 4-inch range, and at least a 6-inch and 9.7-inch tablet,... Read more...
Amazon.com announced on Wednesday that they are going to open their own lending library. Unlike already-established third-party lending libraries, which rely on customers lending e-books to other customers, the Kindle Library Lending, which will launch later this year and allow Kindle users to borrow not from other users, but from over 11,000 libraries nationwide. Kindle Library Lending will be available for all generations of Kindle devices and as well as the free Kindle reading apps available on multiple platforms (Android, iOS, PC, Mac, BlackBerry, or Windows Phone). Users can "check out" a Kindle book from participating libraries, free of charge. In addition, they can make notes and add bookmarks... Read more...
Apple has sued Amazon.com over the use of the name "App Store." Amazon.com just today launched a new Android marketplace called the Amazon Appstore. However, Apple applied to register "App Store" as a trademark in the U.S., and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office approved the application. That said, Microsoft has appealed to the USPTO Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, in an attempt to have Apple's trademark application dismissed, basing its argument on the genericness of "App Store." In its lawsuit against Amazon.com, Apple said that it contacted Amazon three times and demanded that the online retailer cease using the name and that Amazon had not “provided a substantive response.”... Read more...
Retrevo.com, an online gadget review aggregator, recently launched its own online store that is designed to compete with the likes of Amazon.com and BestBuy.com. Retrevo marketing vice president Manish Rathi touted the new online store as a combination of product reviews with a virtual shopping cart. One of the unique features of the new marketplace is the "Do Not Add To Cart Button" that is designed to help protect you from buying a gadget that hasn't been well reviewed. As Rathi put it, "We can't tell you it's wrong and then let you do it." New Retrevo Marketplace Challenges Amazon and BestBuy.com Artificial Intelligence-Based Consumer Advocate is First to Unite Research and E-Commerce for... Read more...
The new App Store rules that Apple announced on Tuesday were planted in a news release about subscriptions.  However, after a number of inquiries from different places, it's clear it's much more far-reaching than that, and at least one content publisher is intimating that leaving the App Store is a distinct possibility. As some feared, the changes are more widespread.  For one, it looks like Amazon.com's Kindle app will be affected by the changes that were announced by Apple on Tuesday. Although the changes seemed to be about subscriptions, it seems that Apple wants its cut of any goods, including digital, served through an iOS app. Apple has confirmed that does not want a cut... Read more...
Obesity is a problem in the United States, and it's not a secret. Gastric bypass surgery is a radical, often last-ditch effort to "cure" the problem, and apparently some have decided that it's not something that requires a doctor: there appears to be a DIY kit available on Amazon.com. Just to be clear, there are two sellers available, but the kit isn't sold by Amazon.com (or fulfilled, either), so Amazon Prime is not an option. Including shipping, the kit will run you about $280, but the item really includes 3 kits, in case you get it wrong the first time. There is no anesthesia included, so you'll have to get that somewhere else. It has a buyer rating of 4.5 out of 5.  However, some have... Read more...
Amazon.com has quietly begun a project to duplicate Wikipedia content and use links in the content to point to books that can be purchased on Amazon.com. The so-called Shopping-enabled Wikipedia Page was reportedly created in November. Amazon spokeswoman Anya Waring told CNET the following: "Shopping-enabled Wikipedia pages are a new introduction on Amazon.com. As of November, we have rolled [the feature] out in the books category; however, [it] will be expanding to new categories in 2011." That means, of course, that in 2011, other product categories will be linked to the pages, such as electronics, computers, toys, video games, and more. Wikipedia, always desperate for funds, isn't making anything... Read more...
If you need any further validation that e-books have finally made it big, here it is. The New York Times plans to launch a bestseller list for e-books in early 2011. The New York Times bestseller lists are the gold standard for defining a book's success. The print version of the bestseller lists are divided into several categories. For e-books, things will start "small." The New York Times will have only two lists covering fiction and non-fiction when it launches. Rankings will be independently verified by third party company RoyaltyShare. You can read the full press release below. The New York Times to Launch eBook Best-Seller Lists Independent Third Party, RoyaltyShare, Inc., Will Help Validate... Read more...
As Apple prepares to launch an Apple TV - Netflix hookup, beginning next week when the new Apple TV ships, Amazon.com is seen to be working on a new subscription service that would stream TV shows and movies, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal. While Amazon.com already has a Video-on-Demand service (first launched in 2006 as Amazon Unbox, as shown below), that service sells individual episodes and movies, some as low as $1.99 apiece. Its new service would be based on a subscription model, similar to Netflix's service, which bundles streaming with DVD rentals. Also similar to Netflix, the new service would work on Web browsers, Internet-connected TVs and BD players, and even video... Read more...
The price of electronic books is going up. Just days before Apple releases its iPad, Amazon.com gave two major publishers permission to raise the price of their eBooks for Kindle readers. The agreements with Simon & Schuster and Harper-Collins give the publishers the ability to break from Amazon's policy of holding new titles to a price of $9.99. Under the terms of the agreement, eBooks from Simon & Schuster and Harper-Collins can now be sold for $12.99 or $14.99. The agreement is similar to the deal Apple has made with publishers. Although Amazon.com sought to keep the price of eBooks low, publishers have argued that digital versions were worth more than Amazon allowed them to charge.... Read more...
Barnes & Noble plans to offer a version of its eReader software designed for the iPad. The eReader will enable users to access more than one million eBooks, magazines, and newspapers in the Barnes & Noble eBookstore as well as content in a user's own Barnes & Noble digital library. Even though the iPad will compete against Barnes & Noble's own device, the Nook, the bookseller is sticking with its commitment to provide the eReader software for as many screens as possible. Barnes & Noble's free eReader software is currently available for most computing and mobile devices such as the PC, Mac, iPhone, iPod touch, and BlackBerry. With Apple entering the e-reader space, some book... Read more...
In the wake of Apple's announcement of the iPad, comes the first salvo in what is probably going to be a drawn out battle. Amazon.com has pulled books published by Macmillan, electronic or not, from its site.Search for authors available from Macmillan, and with the exception, it seems, of library-bound or "bargain books," you won't find Amazon.com pricing for them. You'll find them at "other sellers," but not Amazon.com.  You can see it in the above image for Robert Jordan's "Knife of Dreams." Why would Amazon.com do this? It would seem this is hardly in the best interest of customers, and definitely not in the best interest of the site. Well, according to the New York Times, it's all... Read more...
1 2 3 Next