Intel i925X and i915G Architecture, Pentium 4 560 and 3.4GHz EE - The LGA775 Debut

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Intel's new Codec technology and chipset combinations boast "High Definition Audio" and they also are delivering the tools to utilize it with their new motherboards.  Here's a quick look at Intel Audio Studio on the new i925X and i915P/G Intel Desktop boards.

Intel Audio Studio and High Def Audio performance
High Def Audio with High Def Control

In terms of audio quality and performance, we took the D915GUX board for a spin with a few CDs and DVDs we had lying around the lab.  We drove the sound through a modest pair of Logitech Z-580 4.1 speakers.  The sound quality was fantastic and some of the noise cancellation and environmental control features were really quite good.  For on-board audio you can't beat it, and it easily rivals high end discrete PC audio solutions on the market today.

    

Intel's Audio Studio software provides the user a myriad of features including:

  • Room dynamics simulation
  • Jack sensing and port configuration
  • Environmental controls for width, depth and ambience, noise cancellation
  • Bass Management and tuning
  • 2 to 7.1 channel Extrapolation
  • Real-time digital encoding to an optical port
  • Virtual center channel

We spent some time working with these new features, some of which were a bit gimmicky, others like environmental controls, were impressive enhancements to overall acoustical impact.

HotHardware Test Systems
Tough Competition
SYSTEM 1:
Pentium 4 560 3.6GHz - LGA775

Pentium 4 EE 3.4GHz - LGA775

Intel D915GUX

i915G Motherboard

2x512MB Crucial DDR2 533 PC2-4300

CL4

NVIDIA GeForce 6800 GT


On-Board 10/100 Ethernet
On-Board Audio

WD "Raptor" 36GB Hard Drive
10,000 RPM SATA

Windows XP Pro SP1 (Fully Patched)
NVIDIA Forceware v61.45
DirectX 9.0b
SYSTEM 2:
Pentium 4 560 3.6GHz - LGA775

Pentium 4 EE 3.4GHz - LGA775

Intel D925XCV

i925X Motherboard

2x512MB Crucial DDR2 533 PC2-4300

CL4

NVIDIA GeForce 6800 GT


On-Board 10/100 Ethernet
On-Board Audio

WD "Raptor" 36GB Hard Drive
10,000 RPM SATA

Windows XP Pro SP1 (Fully Patched)
NVIDIA Forceware v61.45
DirectX 9.0b
SYSTEM 3:
Pentium 4 Prescott 3.4GHz S478

Pentium 4 EE 3.4GHz S478
Pentium 4 Northwood 3.4GHz S478


DFI LANParty Pro 875

i875 Motherboard

2x512MB Kingston PC3500
CL2

NVIDIA GeForce 6800 GT


On-Board 10/100 Ethernet
On-Board Audio

WD "Raptor" 36GB Hard Drive
10,000 RPM SATA

Windows XP Pro SP1 (Fully Patched)
NVIDIA Forceware v61.45
DirectX 9.0b
SYSTEM 4:
S939 - AMD Athlon 64 FX-53 (2.4GHz)

S939 - AMD Athlon 64 3800+(2.4GHz)

Asus A8V Deluxe Motherboard
VIA K8T800 Pro Chipset

2x512MB Kingston PC3500
CL2

NVIDIA GeForce 6800 GT


On-Board 10/100 Ethernet
On-Board Audio

WD "Raptor" 36GB Hard Drive
10,000 RPM SATA

Windows XP Pro SP1 (Fully Patched)
NVIDIA Forceware v61.45
DirectX 9.0b

Just a quick note on our test system specs, before we dig into benchmark specifics.  In all our test setups, we used an NVIDIA GeForce 6800 GT graphics card.  In the case of the PCI Express capable Intel systems, we used the NV45 version of the GF 6800 GT and for the AGP graphics based systems we used standard GeForce 6800 GT AGP cards.  In both cases GPU core and memory clock speeds were identical.  For the Intel based systems, we used the latest chipset drivers provided with the i915/i925X launch kit and we used those same drivers on the Canterwood based motherboard as well.  In all cases we were making an effort to utilize identical components across the various Intel and AMD platforms, wherever possible.

Tags:  Intel, 4G, LG, GHz, ECT, ium, LGA775, Pentium 4, Pentium, pen, 560, arc, 4GHz, 5G, LGA, A7, BU, AR, and

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