Items tagged with Pentium

All signs are pointing to the impending release of a new, entry-level Surface tablet. The device has been talked about for months and the latest report suggests that the new Surface will be released by Microsoft this Friday. The information comes from an alleged internal Microsoft document that leaked to a Surface subreddit. According to the leak, the tablet and a complimenting Type Cover will be available via the Microsoft Store. There is no indication if this will simply be a preorder phase for the tablet or if they will actually start shipping on 7/13. Microsoft's newest Surface device made an appearance at the FCC earlier this month, and it was surmised that it would be equipped... Read more...
It seems as though all at once, we're beginning to glean pertinent details about Microsoft's upcoming low-end Surface tablet. Yesterday, we learned that the budget tablet hit the FCC with a 24-watt charger and a 7.5-volt battery. It was also reasoned that the Surface tablet will feature Intel-based processors. Today, we're getting more specifics on those processors, which are said to be from the Pentium family rather than beefier Core range found on the pricier Surface Pro tablets. This news comes from WinFuture, which says that the cheapest Surface will feature a quad-core Gemini Lake Pentium Silver N5000 processor. However, if you need a bit more firepower, Microsoft will offer... Read more...
Okay, so Intel's Kaby Lake lineup does not leave equivalent Skylake processors in the dust. That is a fair enough statement, though for budget buyers, there are some intriguing upgrades that Kaby Lake brings to the table. One of them is Hyper-Threading support for Pentium CPUs based on Intel's newest architecture. That is a rare amenity in the budget Pentium line, and one that was quietly introduced here.While Intel has chosen not to make a lot of noise over the including of Hyper-Threading on its lower end Pentium processors based on Kaby Lake, the Internet took notice. Intel's ARK website lists several new Pentium models with Hyper-Threading enabled, nearly half a dozen in all. They include... Read more...
Intel lifted the curtain on its Kaby Lake architecture earlier this week, its second consecutive "tock" in what used to be its "tick-tock" release cadence and also its 7th generation Core architecture. While that dominated the headlines, Intel also launched its budget-oriented Apollo Lake line, which is the latest generation of its low-power Atom family. Apollo Lake is the successor to Braswell and is built on the same 14nm manufacturing process. It uses Goldmont core and will slip into low-cost devices, such as budget-priced 2-in-1 systems and affordable laptops. While that doesn't sound particularly exciting (from an enthusiast standpoint, anyway), Apollo Lake gives Intel an opportunity to... Read more...
It might "just" be a Pentium, but I consider the G3258 "Anniversary Edition" to be one of the most interesting chips Intel's released in a while. It's a well-known fact that enthusiasts love ekeing as much performance out of their parts as possible, and there's just something about doing that to a sub-$100 part that can be seriously exciting. It's like buying a modest car and turning it into one that "wows" people. While the G3258 has overclockers right in its sights, that doesn't mean that those who don't like manual overclocking can't benefit. For them, GIGABYTE's updated EasyTune, now shipping with a profile for this chip, can help. As hinted by this screenshot, it looks like GIGABYTE would... Read more...
Last year, Intel launched two new processor cores -- the Core i7-4770K, based on the Haswell core, and the Ivy Bridge-based Core i7-4960X. Both chips were incremental updates over their predecessors; Haswell may have delivered impressive gains in mobile, but it failed to impress on the desktop where it was only slightly faster than the chip it replaced. Enthusiasts weren't terribly excited about either core, but Intel is hoping its new Devil's Canyon CPU, which launches today, will change that. The new chip is the Core i7-4790K and it packs several new features that should appeal to the enthusiast and overclocking markets. First, Intel has changed the thermal interface material from the paste... Read more...
Intel used the backdrop of the Game Developers Conference currently taking place in San Francisco to make a handful of interesting announcements that run the gamut from low-power technologies to ultra-high-end desktop chips. In addition to outing a number of upcoming processors—from an Anniversary Edition Pentium to a monster 8-core Haswell-E—Intel also announced a new technology dubbed Ready Mode. Intel described Ready Mode as a “capability that takes advantage of new power-saving states in Intel’s 4th gen Core desktop processor, combined with software and board level optimizations, which enable OEM desktop computers that are instantly ready and always connected while... Read more...
Nvidia isn't happy with what it sees as the free pass Intel's upcoming Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture has gotten on the software front, and it's taken to the blogosphere to challenge it. The post begins with a lengthy discussion of what Nvidia is calling its "hybrid architecture," in which a CPU and GPU get together for great fun and massive execution of properly distributed workloads. The post is conveniently timed to land just before the Texas Advanced Computing Center's (TACC) joint symposium with Intel on highly parallel computing, which kicks off next week. What Nvidia takes issue with, according to the blog, is the idea that using an x86-compatible product like Knights Corner,... Read more...
Intel's presentations at the International Solid State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) this year are focused on one of the biggest problems facing modern CPU designers—how to improve power efficiency without sacrificing compute performance. Intel isn't just tackling this problem through conventional process shrinks and smaller dies, however; the company detailed multiple new approaches. First up is Claremont, Intel's first chip built to run on Near Threshold Voltage (NTV) technology. The term "Near Threshold Voltage" refers to the amount of voltage required to switch a transistor from 0 to 1. Normally, the voltage variation between the two states is significant in order to prevent transistors... Read more...
Intel's marketing division has a long history of partnering with OEMs in order to jointly promote a product, but the company's most recent initiative could create blowback from unhappy customers. According to information unearthed this past weekend, Intel is quietly testing the concept of "upgradeable" CPUs. Instead of buying a physical CPU and going to through the hassle of installing it, customers who purchase one of these systems could optionally purchase an upgrade card (current price: $50). Right now the program appears to be confined to Best Buy and a single Gateway, the SX2841-09e. There's no mention of that system at either companies' website; the specs for the SX2840-01 are available... Read more...
AMD announced its second-quarter earnings yesterday and the company's results, while not perfect, imply continued strong execution. The company's revenue was up 40 percent year-on-year on strong demand for server and mobile parts. Total revenue was $1.65B, up five percent from the first quarter. "Robust demand for our latest mobile platforms and solid execution drove record second quarter revenue and a healthy gross margin," said Dirk Meyer, AMD President and CEO. "Our unmatched combination of microprocessor and graphics capabilities resulted in customers launching a record number of new mobile and desktop platforms. We added Sony as a microprocessor customer and continue to see our existing... Read more...
Let’s go back ten years in time. Ten years ago, in 1997, Intel’s Pentium 2 processor was launched and was a big hit since it was so “fast” at the time, ranging from speeds of about 200 MHz all the way up to 400 some-odd MHz. Of course we have come a long way, and our computers have evolved into much more powerful and compact machines. Nonetheless there’s a new computer that gives us a measure of just how far we’ve actually come. Picture a fully functional computer that measures 2 inches cubed (about 5cm cubed). Yes, it’s approximately the size of a small rubik’s cube, and is over 500 times smaller than the average midtower, in terms of volume that is. This new computer, which they call the “Space... Read more...
If you thought the Pentium name was dead, think again. We've just posted a new article here at HotHardware in which we evaluate the performance, power consumption, and overclockability of Intel's brand-new Pentium E2140 dual-core processor. This chip is a derivative of the 'Conroe' core used in the Core 2 Duo family of processors, but with a smaller cache and lower FSB and core frequencies.  At under $100, it proved to be a solid value, especially after we overclocked it to almost 3GHz using the stock air-cooler. Click the link below and check it out...Intel Pentium E2140 Processor... Read more...
Intel has spent millions making their "Core" brand synonymous with high performance processing. In these days of the Core Duo, Core 2 Duo, Core 2 Quad, and Core 2 Extreme, it’s pretty easy to find a Core microarchitecture-based processor to match nearly any possible price point. The performance levels of the Core 2 product lineup have been so dominating that Intel really didn’t have to spend a penny if they didn’t want to, although big time marketing campaigns are good for converting those who just want the latest and greatest and don’t necessarily read enthusiast sites like ours here. Despite the Core 2 being a successful lineup from top to bottom, Intel’s Pentium product name is still a... Read more...
According to HKEPC, and one of their Taiwanese inside-sources, Intel plans to launch new Celeron and Pentium processors in June based on the Core microarchitecture. These new processors would differ from the Core 2 Duo in their cache sizes and bus speeds, but would still offer significant performance improvements over current Netburst-based Pentiums and Celerons. "We have been told by our source from Taiwan manufacturer that Intel would officially release Pentium E and Celeron 400 product lines on June 3. At that time of release, Core micro-architecture will then cover all range of desktop processor segment. Pentium E2160 (1.8GHz/1MB L2/800MHz FSB) and Pentium E2140 (1.6GHz/.1MB L2/800MHz FSB)... Read more...
There's an interesting article posted over at MadShrimps this morning. The crew took a couple of Intel Mobile processors -- the Core Duo and Pentium M -- and tested them "shoot-out" style in a desktop platform.  If you're not familiar with Intel's mobile processors, you're going to be surprised by their performance. "The Pentium Mobile line of processors have become quite popular with hardware enthusiasts as they offer a better performance per Mhz than their desktop companions. We compare Intel's Core Duo for mobiles to their Pentium M, overclocking them on a desktop system they go head to head."... Read more...
If you've been shopping for a processor, you may have noticed that Intel silently launched a new Pentium D CPU recently, the dual-core 3.6GHz Pentium D 960. The gang at HardwareZone plucked one fresh from the assembly line and have posted their thoughts about its performance and value.  Not a bad chip -- it's almost a shame Conroe is right around the corner. "Quite frankly, we thought the Pentium 965 Extreme Edition from Intel was the last attempt at rivaling AMD with their existing Presler based CPUs. While we are still right that they haven't put up any speedier models than they already have, a check recently on their Pentium... Read more...
The HardwareZone has taken a look at Intel's current flagship Pentium Extreme Edition 955 and 965 processors. We evaluated both of these CPUs a while back as well.  You can see our take on the 955 here, and the 965 here. "Succeeding their lackluster predecessors, the new Pentium XE processors based on the Presler core sport some serious specs. With clock speeds of up to 3.73GHz, loaded with 4MB of L2 cache and taking advantage of a 1066MHz FSB, they seem to instill fear into AMD's A64 FX series; but are they that extreme?"  ... Read more...
Hey everyone. I've been playing with one of Intel's Pentium D 805 processors for most of this morning, and have some interesting news to report.  If you're unfamiliar with the Pentium D 805, it's basically a cheap, dual-core CPU based on Intel's 90nm Smithfield core. What separates the Pentium D 805 from most of its Smithfield-based counterparts, is that the 805 rides on a 533MHz FSB. And it's also the lowest clocked dual-core desktop processor available from Intel at the moment at 2.66GHz. This, of course, makes the Pentium D 805 a potential candidate for overclockers on a budget looking to jump on the dual-core bandwagon.  How good of a candidate was a question I had up until a few... Read more...
About three months ago, we took a look at the Pentium Extreme Edition 955, which was Intel's first Extreme Edition processor built using the company's then brand-new 65nm manufacturing process. Each of the 955XE chip's two cores hummed along at a lofty 3.46GHz, and we found its performance to be quite good when compared to Intel's previous dual-core and single-core offerings. The Pentium Extreme Edition 955 was clearly Intel's fastest desktop dual-core processor in our tests, and due to the inherent benefits of the more advanced manufacturing process, the chip consumed much less power than its predecessor under-load, even though it was clocked almost 10% higher and was equipped with double the... Read more...
Not sure we agree with Hardcoreware.net's contention that "the playing field is level" now that AMD and Intel both offer dual-core processors, but if you want to see how the Athlon 64 X2 stacks up against a Pentium D, they've got some benchmarks for you to chew on. When you're done though, make sure to check out our Athlon 64 FX-60 and Pentium Extreme Edition 955 articles as well."Deciding between an Athlon64 and a Pentium 4 used to be a generally tough decision. AMD was easily faster in games, but the Pentium 4 was always backed by superior platforms (Intel's own chipsets), better multitasking performance thanks to HyperThreading, and generally better audio and video encoding performance.... Read more...
Our friends at the TechReport have just posted and article that pits Intel's Pentium M 760 up against AMD's Turion 64 ML-44.  These two mobile CPUs represent the best single-core technology available from AMD and Intel for the mobile space.  Core Duo is here and dual-core Turions are on the Horizon, but if you want to know which processor reigns supreme in the current landscape, Scott's bound to give you his opinion. "ALTHOUGH INTEL HAS BEEN STRUGGLING on the desktop front of late, things on the mobile side have been going just fine, thank you. In fact, the Pentium M has been doing so well that Intel's desktop line will eventually... Read more...
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