Items tagged with (NASDAQ:MU)

Good news folks, the era of DDR5 memory is upon us, let's all celebrate! Well, sort of—you may want to buy the cheap champagne instead of the good stuff. Micron announced it is mass producing the world's first low power DDR5 DRAM (LPDDR5), which will find its way into high-end smartphones starting with Xiaomi's Mi 10. Apologies if we got you excited about DDR5 infiltrating the PC landscape—that will have to wait for another day (though it's coming). For now, LPDDR5 is bound for the mobile segment, and with comes "superior power efficiency" and faster speeds to keep pace with gains in artificial intelligence and 5G connectivity technologies. "Micron’s leadership in delivering... Read more...
Micron is laying claim to the world's fastest solid state drive (SSD) ever built, and on paper at least, it is an accurate statement. Its new X100 SSD is rated to deliver more than 9 gigabytes per second (GB/s) of read and write bandwidth, a staggering figure for sure, along with up to 2.5 million IOPS. These figures make it more than 3X faster than competitive SSD offerings, Micron says. As you may have surmised, the X100 is bound for datacenters rather than home PCs. That's okay, though, because bleeding edge technology often starts in the datacenter and eventually trickles down into the consumer space. In the meantime, we will have to make do with the growing field of PCI Express 4.0 SSDs... Read more...
Micron on Thursday made a series of storage announcements, including the introduction of two new solid state drive lines, the 7300 SSD and 5300 SSD. The 7300 SSD line is designed to bring NVMe levels of performance to "the masses" in the datacenter realm, while the 5300 SSD line represents the industry's first enterprise SATA SSD built on 96-layer 3D triple-level cell (TLC) NAND memory chips. Micron 7300 And 5300 SSDs Specifications Starting at the top, the 7300 SSD series also utilizes 96-layer 3D TLC NAND flash memory chips to deliver low power and reduce the total cost of ownership for enterprise cloud customers. Micron says these SSDs are designed specifically to handle workloads requiring... Read more...
The storage needs of smartphone users are not diminishing, they are only expanding with the advent of high resolution photography and 4K video. To account for this, Micron and Western Digital (through its SanDisk subsidiary) announced the industry's very first 1-terabyte capacity microSD storage cards for consumers. While both solutions offer the same amount of capacity, Western Digital's has the higher read performance rating——the 1TB SanDisk Extreme UHS-I microSDXC card is rated to hit read speeds of up to 160MB/s, whereas Micron's c200 1TB microSDXC card is rated to read data at 100MB/s. Rated write speeds are similar between the two at 90MB/s for Western Digital/SanDisk and 95MB/s... Read more...
Micron on Wednesday made a couple of announcements aimed at advancing the mobile memory and enterprise storage markets. Starting with the former, Micron said it has begun mass producing the industry's highest capacity monolithic memory for mobile devices and applications, and specifically 12-gigabit (Gb) low-power double data rate 4x (LPDDR4x) DRAM. The LPDDR4x DRAM is being produced on a 10-nanometer class process technology. Micron claims the new memory is capable of reducing power by up to 10 percent at similar data rates of 4,266 megabits per second (Mbps) compared to previous generation memory. Realistically that's not going to have a big impact on a smartphone's battery life, but every... Read more...
Intel has made an impressive showing in the SSD market with its Optane family, which is based on 3D XPoint memory technology. Intel makes available Optane Memory -- available in 16GB, 32GB and 64GB capacities -- that is used to cache frequently accessed data in your operating system along with Optane SSDs, which are available for consumer, enthusiast, and enterprise applications. The 3D XPoint technology that forms the basis of Optane was co-developed by Intel and Micron, and the pair have announced that a second-generation of the non-volatile, low-latency memory is currently in development. Both companies have estimated that development on second-gen 3D XPoint will be completed during the first... Read more...
Micron is now mass producing next generation 8-gigabit (Gb) GDDR6 memory chips that will be used in a broad range of applications, the company announced today. The significance of this is that it means Micron is right on schedule with its next-gen graphics memory rollout—Micron in December of last year stated that its initial progress was "very promising" and that it was aiming to ramp up production in the first half of 2018. These new chips are Micron's fastest and most powerful graphics memory to date. Micron envision GDDR6 being used in high performance applications such as artificial intelligence (AI), networking, automotive, and of course paired with graphics processing units (GPUs).... Read more...
Next-generation graphics cards that employ new GDDR6 memory should offer gobs of additional memory bandwidth. That new memory has been in the works for a while now and mass production has begun at various manufacturers as well. That means we could be seeing graphics cards launch soon packing the new memory on-board. In fact, NVIDIA wil soon be talking a bit about its GTX11 GPUs that will use GDDR6 memory. Micron has offered up some details that talk about some aspects of the new RAM and it sports significant updates. Micron notes that GDDR6 has several silicon enhancements, and has offered insight about performance measurements of the new memory, along with its improved signal integrity. One... Read more...
Price fixing in the DRAM market is nothing new unfortunately. As recently as January this year, a Chinese regulator accused Samsung other chip manufacturers of artificially increasing prices to pad their margins. Samsung is also no stranger to price fixing, as a $300 million judgement against it and Hynix was handed down in 2006 here in the United States. Today, however, Samsung and other DRAM manufacturers are facing another legal fight in the U.S., and it comes courtesy of the law firm Hagens Berman. A class action lawsuit was filed today in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California and alleges that Samsung, Micron and Hynix conspired to artificially limit... Read more...
Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are becoming an increasingly more valuable resource in the computing arena. We've seen high-powered GPUs powering everything from gaming consoles, to high-end enthusiast PCs, to accelerators used for artificial intelligence and machine learning applications, to products like NVIDIA's DRIVE PX which enables advanced machine vision for autonomous vehicles. As GPUs get more powerful with each new generation, there also comes a need for faster memory to fuel them. In the case of Micron, the company has been delivering GDDR5X memory solutions for today's high-end graphics cards. Micron's GDDR5X started out at 10Gbps, but has since ramped up to 11Gbps and finally... Read more...
There are competing memory standards in the graphics industry, including GDDR5, GDDR5X, and high bandwidth memory (HBM) solutions. What will tomorrow bring? If you ask Micron, the memory with roots in Boise, Idaho will tell you that it has a roadmap in place for faster GDDR5X memory and is also working on next-generation GDDR6 memory chips. For geeks like us, it has been interesting to observe the evolving graphics memory standards. For a moment in time, it looked like HBM (and now HBM2) chips were the future, but Micron proved that GDDR still had legs when it announced in 2015 that it was developing a next-generation memory technology called GDDR5X. Now a current generation standard, GDDR5X... Read more...
Over the past decade, solid state drives (SSDs) have matured from a product that while faster than hard drives, were too expensive for mainstream consumers to a storage medium that we simply take for granted — especially in notebook systems. SSD technology has also invaded every segment of the PC market from desktops to workstations to high-end servers and data centers. Today, Micron is introducing a new storage system that takes SSDs out of their traditional home — a PC — and puts them in their own homogeneous data boxes. Micron says that this “SolidScale” architecture promises low latency and “extremely high throughput” for both legacy and cloud-native applications, transaction processing,... Read more...
Eventually we're going to see next-generation graphics cards outfitted with GDDR5X memory. It's a process getting to that point, and slowly but surely, things are moving along. To wit, JEDEC ratified the GDDR5X specification back in January of this year, and not even a full month later Micron announced that its GDDR5X program was in "full swing" with sampling to soon follow. Well, that time has come.We just got word straight from Micron that it has indeed started sampling GDDR5X memory to clients. That's a big deal because it's one of the last steps in the rather long process of introducing new technology into the consumer market. The next announcement you're likely to hear about GDDR5X memory... Read more...
Everyone who builds a PC from the ground up faces several decisions along the way, one of which relates to storage—do you go with a fast solid state drive, or stretch your dollar-per-gigabyte with a capacious hard drive? In the end, most of us settle on a modestly sized SSD for the OS and a beefy HDD for storage chores, but what if you could have the best of both worlds? The industry is heading in that direction.Intel and Micron have been tag-teaming various storage and memory technologies, like 3D XPoint (pronounced "cross point") memory, and word on the web is that the fruits of that partnership is a 10-terebyte SSD that's right around the corner—yes folks, 10 freaking terabytes. Talk about... Read more...
Micron Technology, the memory maker headquartered in Boise, Idaho, is making waves today. First is the announcement that it's acquiring the remaining shares of Inotera for approximately $3.2 billion, and secondly Micron is talking about a next generation memory technology to rival the performance of High Bandwidth Memory (HBM). Starting with the latter, Micron's Kristopher Kido confirmed the company's plans to release its new memory next year. It will likely be called GDDR5X and offer speeds of 10Gbps to 14Gbps, up to double that of existing 7Gbps 4Gb GDDR5 memory chips. More capacious 8Gb density chips won't push speeds quite as much, though will still end up at 8Gbps. You'll find Micron's new... Read more...
Flash storage outfit SanDisk has a couple of suitors in Western Digital and Micron, two of the company's rivals. Nothing is yet imminent, though SanDisk is in talks with both outfits about a potential sale. It's not known what the asking price is for SanDisk, which has a market capitalization of more than $14.3 billion.News of the sales talks comes from Bloomberg and the "people with knowledge of the matter" that it spoke with. According to those sources, SanDisk has hired a bank to evaluate the situation and perhaps help facilitate a sale, if talks get that far. As of right now, no decision has been made on the matter.The idea of a buyout has investors excited. SanDisk's stock spiked by as much... Read more...
With all the hype surrounding AMD's use of High Bandwidth Memory (HBM) for its Fury line of graphics card, you would be excused for thinking GDDR5 memory had died and become a footnote. You'd also be wrong. There's still more bandwidth to be squeezed out of GDDR5 memory, and that's what Micron has done. The Boise, Idaho-based memory maker announced today that the 8Gb (gigabit, not gigabyte) GDDR5 memory it was previously sampling to customers is now widely available. Compared to the current crop of 4Gb GDDR5 memory, the newly available 8Gb chips push the bandwidth ceiling from 7Gbps up to 8Gbps. The advancement also makes it possible to increase the frame buffer on graphics cards without jacking... Read more...
Tsinghua Unigroup Ltd., a Chinese state-owned semiconductor design firm, is reportedly making a play to acquire Micron Technology Inc. for $23 billion. Should the transaction ultimately happen, there would be no more U.S. memory makers left standing. However, there are several hurdles that stand in the way of the transaction, including the purchase price. Citing people familiar with the matter, The Wall Street Journal says Tsinghua Unigroup is trying to acquire Micron for $21 per share. That represents a more than 19 percent premium over Micron's stock price at the time the story broke, and though that seems attractive at a glance, it's also around 21 percent below Micron's 100-day moving average... Read more...
Depending on the "3D" we're talking about, it could either be amazing, or "meh". 3D gaming? Awesome. 3D movies? Meh. 3D memory? Incredible. Why? Because with 3D stacked memory technology instantly gives a hearty boost to both density and bandwidth. There's a reason both AMD and NVIDIA are going to be making use of 3D memory in their respective future graphics cards. To help put things into immediate perspective, take a look at the "gumstick" SSD in the shot above (the long card). Because of their 3D memory, Micron and Intel say that hitting 3.5TB on drives of this size will be possible. Meanwhile, our traditional 2.5-inch SSDs could surpass 10TB. This kind of storage is the kind of density you... Read more...
We tend to get pretty excited about new solid state drive (SSD) announcements. Why? Well, the more SSDs that flood the market, the better the chances that prices will continue to push downwards. See where we're coming from? With that in mind, Crucial took advantage of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas to out its new MX200 and BX100 SSD lines. Starting with the former, the MX200 is built for performance on a SATA 6Gbps interface, and as such, these drives boast sequential reads and writes of up to 555MB/s and 500MB/s, respectively, as well as random reads of up to 100,000 IOPS and random writes of up to 87,000 IOPS -- not too shabby! Just as important is endurance, and according... Read more...
Intel today made a splash at the International Supercomputing Conference in Leipzig, Germany by revealing new details about its next-generation Xeon Phi processor technology. You may better recognize Xeon Phi by its codename, Knights Landing, which we covered in some detail earlier this year. No matter what you call it, this represents a significant leap in High Performance Computing (HPC) that will deliver up to three times the performance of previous generations while consuming less power. A big part of the reason for this is the construction of a new high-speed interconnect technology called Intel Omni Scale Fabric, which Intel has been a bit cagey about, though reportedly it is comprised... Read more...
The DDR4 future looms increasingly large, as Crucial announced that it’s now sampling DDR4 server memory to channel partners who are working on platforms to support the latest generation of RAM. "Memory is one of the biggest limitations when it comes to enterprise server environments,” said Michael Moreland, worldwide product marketing manager, Crucial. “Many memory-dependent server applications are crucial to the day-to-day operations of a business, but they require higher densities of memory and increased performance." He added that DDR4 will help servers run faster and more efficiently while seeing a reduction in power consumption and costs related to cooling. DDR4 promises... Read more...
1 2 Next