Items tagged with NASDAQ: NVDA

For school age kids and college bound adults, August represented the last month of freedom to hunker down in the bedroom or basement with the shades drawn so that the sun and its pesky glare wouldn't get in the way of gaming. Those same PCs are now turning their attention to school work as research reports and other types of homework are on the horizon, but as we look at Steam's latest hardware and software survey, we can see what most gamers were using this past summer. From March 2012 to August 2013, the majority of gamers -- 52.28 percent -- ran NVIDIA graphics, followed by a third leaning on AMD/ATI. Intel came in third at 14.18 percent, though the script gets flipped if heading over to the... Read more...
Hot on the heels of Microsoft and Gameloft's partnership comes this: an alliance between NVIDIA and Ubisoft. Announced at Gamescom this week, the two mainstays have decided to partner up in order to bolster Assassins Creed IV: Black Flag, Splinter Cell Blacklist, and Watch_Dogs with NVIDIA-developed technologies and features, and other PC-exclusive enhancements like DirectX 11-powered Tessellation.The first Ubisoft title to benefit from this alliance is Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell Blacklist, which launches worldwide this week with NVIDIA TXAA, NVIDIA HBAO+, and full support for NVIDIA SLI. NVIDIA TXAA is a PC-exclusive film-style Anti-Aliasing (AA) technique designed specifically to tackle... Read more...
Rumors have been swirling that NVIDIA is interested in launching its own brand tablet line, which should be an easy transition for the company after SHIELD. There's been chatter of a high-end Android tablet built around the company's Tegra 5 platform, and also a more affordable 7-inch slate, pictures of which have found their way to the web. Chinese language website MyDrivers.com posted a couple of authentic looking shots of of the Tegra Tab 7's backside, giving viewers a glimpse of the tablet's NVIDIA-inspired styling. A textured grip runs down the spine and is shaped like an hourglass, with plastic wrapping over the two sides. There looks to be a slot for a stylus, a feature that would help... Read more...
A few days ago, an unheard-of NVIDIA device showed up in some GFXBench benchmark results alongside the NVIDIA SHIELD (which we reviewed here); the device, which is apparently dubbed the NVIDIA Tegra Note Premium, has a resolution of 1280x736 (which indicates a smallish tablet form factor), and the German site that found the results said that the processor was a Tegra 4 (1.8GHz) chip, and it was running Android 4.2.2. It may also come with a stylus of some kind. NVIDIA Project SHIELD The assumption is that this mystery device could be a purely NVIDIA-branded 7-inch (or so) tablet, and now it appears that NVIDIA may also be developing a high-end tablet with its own name on the box. FUDzilla, citing... Read more...
IBM is following in the footsteps of ARM and will begin licensing its core intellectual property for its POWER technologies to other companies for use in designing servers employed in cloud data centers, the company announced. The licensing model is part of IBM's OpenPOWER Consortium, a new initiative aimed at expanding the technology choices available to modern IT developers, or so the official explanation goes. In reality, IBM is offering up its POWER chip technology to anyone who wants it, which in the long run will make IBM (and its hardware partners) more competitive with AMD and Intel. IBM has already found some willing participants to join its consortium, including Google, Mellanox, TYAN,... Read more...
We already gave NVIDIA's Shield handheld gaming device a pretty thorough once-over in our official review, though one thing we didn't do is disassemble the gadget and take a look at its guts. It's not that we didn't want to, but such operations are best left to the fearless folks at iFixIt, who post some of the best teardowns you'll find on the web. As luck would have it, they got their paws on a Shield device of their own and proceeded to take it apart. The 20-step teardown reveals that Shield is fairly easy to crack open. It's kind of like opening up a traditional gaming controller, only what you'll find inside is more complicated. Much more complicated, in fact, as it's crammed full of pieces... Read more...
Nvidia is showing off a bit more of the capabilities of its upcoming Kepler-based mobile GPU at SIGGRAPH this week, and the next-generation chip should be a quantum leap over what Nvidia is shipping currently. Then again, that's scarcely difficult -- Tegra 4 is based on 2005-era graphics hardware with some L2 cache and a few feature enhancements here and there. It doesn't support CUDA, DirectX 11, OpenCL, OpenGL ES 3.0, and it while it packs far more pixel shader and vertex pipelines than Tegra 3 offered, it was disappointing to those of us that hoped to see a Kepler-based design this generation. Tegra 5 supposedly fixes all this. The next-generation core will offer cutting-edge support for all... Read more...
The lead-up to the launch of NVIDIA's SHIELD sure has been a strange one. At one point, demand had been so strong for the device, that NVIDIA pulled pre-orders ahead by a couple of days, and then, it dropped the price for the same reason. Then last month, when we were just about to see it hit the market, the company discovered a flaw that forced it to delay the launch by at least a month. Things have been a bit mum since then, but we can now say that the launch will finally take place at the very end of the month. SHIELD is one of the more ambitious projects that NVIDIA has ever taken on, and it's one that has quite a bit of potential. While mobile gaming is huge, not everyone (including me)... Read more...
Nearly one billion dollars. Even for a company as massive, powerful and entrenched as Microsoft, that sum is one that simply cannot be ignored. It just can't be brushed aside. And in the company's latest quarterly earnings, the $900 million charge that it took related to Surface RT inventory adjustments became the focal point. It was honestly hard to look at the company's revenues and profits; the only thing that most critics could focus on was that massive, massive charge. Can you blame them? Microsoft took center stage back in 2012 when it announced that it would begin shipping its own branded hardware in the tablet space. Surface RT would be the launch product, offering up a unique new twist... Read more...
Coinciding with the launch of NVIDIA's mid-range darling, the GeForce GTX 760 (be sure to check out our full review with plenty of benchmarks), EVGA unveiled its lineup of graphics cards built around the new part. There are more than half a dozen SKUs to choose from, including three that use EVGA's custom ACX Cooling solution. The ACX Cooler uses a double ball bearing design with fan blades that are of the "highest quality," EVGA says. When compared to what its competitors are using for their own dual-fan designs, EVGA claims its fan blades are 700 percent stronger and 25 percent lighter, making them them 20 percent more efficient by requiring lower power levels. And because of the double ball... Read more...
For the last 20 years, NVIDIA has developed and used its own graphics IP in-house. While the company engaged in several prominent cross-licensing deals with companies like Intel, those deals never resulted in an Intel-branded graphics card or an equivalent product from another company. Today, that changes -- NVIDIA has announced that henceforth, it will license its graphics designs to other companies. In a blog post today, company spokesperson David Shannon writes: "our next step is to license our GPU cores and visual computing patent portfolio to device manufacturers to serve the needs of a large piece of the market... We’ll start by licensing the GPU core based on the NVIDIA Kepler architecture,... Read more...
Bolstered by the recent mad dash by consumers and manufacturers alike towards mobile computing, truly ARM has become too large to ignore. ARM has benefited the most from mobile device sales, proving that it's a capable architecture and a worthy competitor to x86 silicon, so it shouldn't come as a shock that NVIDIA equipped its CUDA 5.5 Release Candidate (RC) with ARM support. CUDA 5.5 is the first version of the parallel computing platform and programming language to play nice with ARM, meaning it natively supports GPU-accelerated computing on systems built around ARM chips. It will also make it easier and faster for developers to port applications over. Other than ARM support, CUDA 5.5 brings... Read more...
They say it’s not usually a good idea to see how and where the sausage is made, but Gearbox CEO Randy Pitchford gave a tour of the Gearbox Studios and his own home for an NVIDIA Project SHIELD showcase video to show how all the places and people involved in creating (and playing) the company’s games. In the Gearbox offices tour, we see some the development studio, the motion capture studio, and the animation put where animators work up the eye candy, and there’s also a focus tester room where regular joes and janes off the street get to test unreleased titles for free (and receive nifty swag in return). We also get a peek into the top floor offices, which is usually the realm... Read more...
Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) continues to attract high-level talent from around the industry as it gears up to compete in a new era of computing. The latest person to jump into AMD's talent pool is an old friend of ours, Sean Pelletier, a former HotHardware editor and more recently NVIDIA's Senior Technical Marketing Manager for Windows, Windows RT, and Apple Notebooks. We had a chance to catch up with Pelletier yesterday, who told us he accepted a position as Technical Marketing Manager at AMD. His focus at first will be on GPU products, which makes perfect sense given his background at NVIDIA. Pelletier represents another solid hire for AMD, which has been successful in plucking talent from... Read more...
Lessons in Greek mythology made it clear that you shouldn't mess with Zeus, the big daddy of deities. He carried around a thunderbolt, for Pete's sake. Or, at least he used to. Boutique system builder CyberPowerPC has called upon the ancient child of Cronus and Rhea to serve as the god of its gaming line, and instead of a thunderbolt, the company's new Zeus EVO Storm Series wields an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 graphics card. The Zeus EVO Storm starts at around $1,499, though that price tag jumps a little past $2,000 if equipping it with a GTX 780. Otherwise, a baseline configuration consists of a CFI Boreallight full tower gaming case, Intel Core i7 3820 processor with "Pro OC" option (overclock... Read more...
More often than not, boutique system build Maingear is on the ball with new product releases, and today's launch of NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 780 graphics card is no exception. No sooner had NVIDIA announced its new card, Maingear tugged on our ear to let us know it's offering the new part in its lineup of gaming systems, including the popular SHIFT and F131 desktops. Configure a system with a single card or go crazy with a 3-way SLI setup. Either way, Maingear will happily assemble your dream machine around NVIDIA's latest GPU. "Offering the very best performance and experience is important to us and our customers, with the new NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 built in our desktops, gaming and entertainment... Read more...
NVIDIA’s new FaceWorks technology is a leap forward in making computer-generated images look more lifelike. In an onstage presentation, NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang prefaced the amazing demo with a brief discussion about the evolution of realistic face imaging and the “uncanny valley”--or those occasions where an artificial image is so lifelike that it’s creepy. NVIDIA developed the technology behind FaceWorks with Paul Debevec and the Institute for Creative Technology (ICT) at USC in California. The group built a “light stage” that is, to hear Huang describe it, a room-sized sphere equipped with 156 cameras with white LEDs that can capture light from all directions... Read more...
NVIDIA's like a little kid at grade school who just received a new toy and can't wait to bring it to class for show-and-tell. The only difference is that what NVIDIA's peddling is much cooler than a yo-yo or a Tonka truck, it's a portable game system stocked with Android Jelly Bean and outfitted with a Tegra 4 SoC (System-on-Chip). If you're as excited about SHIELD as NVIDIA is, we have good news for you. Rather than make the gaming masses wait until Monday to place their pre-orders, NVIDIA and its partners will happily take your cash today. Barring any last minute surprises, SHIELD is still expected to ship by the end of June, so there's no change in availability, just when you can actually... Read more...
We've been excited about NVIDIA's Project SHIELD platform ever since we spent some hands-on time with a pre-production unit earlier this year at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. In case you missed the buzz, Project SHIELD, now simply called SHIELD, is an open platform gaming portable with an integrated 5-inch display. It's built to run Android, but also allows gamers to wirelessly access their GeForce GTX GPU-powered PC for additional streaming fun. NVIDIA has gone and finalized the specs and will begin taking pre-orders for SHIELD on May 20 (next Monday), though if you click the "Notify Me" button on SHIELD's website, you'll have an exclusive opportunity to place your pre-order... Read more...
NVIDIA recently announced plans to support Sony's upcoming PlayStation 4 (PS4) console with its PhysX and APEX software development kits (SDKs), but the core hardware inside all belongs to AMD. It didn't have to be that way -- NVIDIA could have powered the PS4 with a custom built GPU of its own, and had negotiations with Sony gone differently, that may have been the case. Tony Tamasi, Senior VP of content and technology at NVIDIA, told GameSpot that the price Sony was willing to pay simply wasn't high enough. Whether that means Sony tried lowballing NVIDIA or whether NVIDIA itself was just too expensive for Sony's blood isn't known, just that the two sides couldn't come to terms on a deal.... Read more...
Consider the gauntlet thrown down by NVIDIA. The company has provided additional information about its upcoming Tegra 4 and Tegra 4i mobile platforms at the Mobile World Congress conference currently taking place in Barcelona, including new performance benchmarks and architectural details. The well-timed platform upgrade comes at a time when Tegra 3, with its older GPU technology, is starting to lag behind the best the competition has to offer, which includes SoCs from Apple and Qualcomm. Tegra 4 is an attempt to wrestle back the performance crown in a big way. Before we examine some of NVIDIA's performance claims and in-house benchmarks, let's have a look at the architecture. There are... Read more...
When NVIDIA released a limited beta of its GeForce Experience software last month, 40,000 gamers wasted no time in jumping on top of it. Not long after its release, NVIDIA pulled access to the download, in order to let testing and bug-fixing commence. Now, just a month later, NVIDIA has issued a slew of bug fixes and updates, and has officially released the client as an open beta. Among the bug fixes or improvements is proper detection of 2560x1440 displays, definitions for Intel's Core 2 Duo or Quad CPUs, improved translations (UK English, Chinese, Danish) and improved performance. Games that have just had their profiles added include Far Cry 3, Mechwarrior Online, Hawken, Hitman: Absolution,... Read more...
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