Items tagged with Future

Sony will offer an ultra-thin flat television starting in December in Japan. It's the first to use the spiffy new organic organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology. It's not cheap for what you get: only 11" at around $1740.00, but OLEDs are wafer thin, use much less power than LEDs or plasma, and are great at displaying fast moving images without ghosting. It is technologically difficult at the moment to make larger panels, limiting the appeal of the otherwise promising next-generation television. Panasonic maker Matsushita Electric Industrial Co Ltd is offering 103-inch plasma TVs, while the main battle ground for LCD TV... Read more...
Being that this is just a rumor followed by speculation, take all of this with a grain of salt.The first bit of news is that Intel is apparently considering an entry-level Xeon platform that would get rid of FB-DIMMs.  FB-DIMMs have their good uses, but tend to be more expensive, run hotter, and have some latency penalties which can adversely affect the performance of some applications. “FB-DIMMs consume quite a bit more power with commensurate heat (RAM fan is a necessity, not an option, on these), the AMB chip in there adds a bit of latency as well - although, with recent version, nearly the same as typical registered DIMM, and, well, these modules ain't cheap by any measure.Even the brand... Read more...
There has been a lot of confusion recently concerning upcoming AMD sockets dubbed AM2+ and AM3.  Since AMD hasn’t released anything official, all we really have to go on is speculation.Current speculation has yet to settle on exactly which CPUs will fit into which sockets, with some people/sites claiming any AMx CPU will work in any AM series socket and with other people/sites saying the exact opposite: AM2+ only in AM2+, AM2 only in AM2 and so on.  There are also many varying rumors in the middle.Here’s the latest speculation about socket compatibility: “According to our sources, AMD has understood the error of its ways and future processor sockets will be interoperable, at least in the upgrade... Read more...
John Carmack, owner of id Software, appeared at Apple Worldwide Developers Conference and delivered the first public demonstration of id's next generation game engine. It allows almost unlimited visual tinkering separate from the mechanics of the game. Tools to be provided by Id mean "They have unlimited flexibility to change as much as they want on the surfaces with no impact on the performance or the stability of the game," said Carmack. So once the game developers have done their part, artists can be let loose on the visual appearance "to make it look as good as we have time or resources to do." Multiple artists can work on different aspects of the world at the same time.... Read more...
INTEL ELIMINATES USE OF LEAD FROM FUTURE MICROPROCESSORS Innovative Intel 45 Nanometer High-k Metal Gate Processors Go Lead-Free; Part of Intel’s Broad Commitment to Environmental Sustainability SANTA CLARA, Calif., May 22, 2007 – Intel Corporation today announced that its future processors, beginning with its entire family of 45 nanometer (nm) high-k metal gate (Hi-k) processors, are going 100 percent lead-free. The Intel 45nm Hi-k family includes the next-generation Intel® Core™ 2 Duo, Core 2 Quad and Xeon® processors, and the company will begin 45nm Hi-k production in the second half of this year. “Intel is taking an aggressive... Read more...
Apple has an update for its ubiquitous Quicktime multimedia software, to fix the exploit discovered at a security conference two weeks ago. Remember, the exploit works if you're running Windows too, so everybody should get the update if you have Quicktime.  The exploit with QuickTime for Java was first reported as a Mac OS X issue as it was the winner in a $10,000 price to break into a MacBook Pro set up at a recent security conference. It was later revealed as a cross-platform security flaw that affects Mac and Windows users alike. Security experts opined that it was inevitable the Mac would suffer such issues. The exploit’s discoverer, Dino Dai Zovi, said he’s been using Mac OS... Read more...
C|Net has an interview with Intel's General Manager of the Digital Enterprise Group, Pat Gelsinger, on-line today.  Pat talks about the convergence of the Itanium and Xeon platforms, the projected life-span of hafnium and metal gate transistors, and the heterogeneous versus homogeneous multicore debate going on within Intel. I expect that debate to be going until 2020, and I expect--in my crystal ball--different market segments coming to different conclusions in that discussion. You can clearly envision--and this is an easier discussion to have after IDF (Intel Developer Forum) than it is today, so we'll have to have the next installment... Read more...
IBM has found a way to allow memory to deliver data closer to the rate at which processors request it by replacing embedded SRAM in computer chips with a new kind of DRAM developed specifically for use in microprocessors. IBM's "eDRAM" or embedded DRAM will help boost performance in future multi-core processors, especially in gaming and multimedia applications, with significantly reduced latencies. IBM said it has been able to speed up the DRAM to the point where it's nearly as fast as SRAM, and that the result is a type of memory known as embedded DRAM, or eDRAM, that helps boost the performance of chips with multiple core calculating engines and is particularly... Read more...
ATI has recently divulged some information on their upcoming Catalyst drivers and announced a plethora of new features to be implemented in the coming months. These improvements and new features include significant OpenGL support and optimization, CrossFire support for OpenGL applications running on Vista, HD DVD and Blu-Ray support for the 64-bit version of Vista, and eventually the introduction of MSAA adaptive anti-aliasing. AMD has not committed to release dates for these features but says we can expect to see them show up in catalyst releases over the next few months with the goal of having them all implemented by May. Today I was able to speak with Terry Makedon, the... Read more...
Our friends at the Tech Report sat in on AMD's four hour financial presentation today and gathered some information regarding AMD's future plans to introduce custom "Accelerated Processing Units" in next-gen multi-core processors. "During its four-hour Financial Analyst Day presentation today, AMD revealed new elements of its processor roadmap spanning the next couple of years, as well as its plans to scale beyond the current multi-core model. Intel talked about processors with "tens to hundreds of cores" at IDF earlier this year, but AMD believes the core race is just a repeat of the megahertz race and that adding more cores... Read more...
Departing a bit from the hardware you are used to, Robert Dunham gives an interesting read in his "The Future of Hardware and Technology".No harddrives, CPUs, motherboards or monitors here. Just good old bionics, robots and androids. Technologically, we live in an ever-evolving world that is seemingly limited only by our own imaginations and the expanding confines of science. Recent technological breakthroughs have given us the glimpse of a future that was once believed to only be science fiction. In the very near future we could see imagination turned into reali Read more here...... Read more...
Verisign has been the administrator over the .com address since 1999, and will continue to be until at least 2012. The new deal which has been approved by the US Government will give Verisign complete control over the .com address, and has the right to manipulate .com prices to a certain degree. "Details of that deal were handed over to the US Department of Commerce in March 2006. Although the internet is increasingly an international phenomenon, the US retains the right to rubber-stamp Icann decisions on how the infrastructure operates. The National Telecommunications and Information Administration, an agency of the US Department of Commerce,... Read more...
Futuremark, the creator of the popular benchmarking suites 3DMark and PCMark, has updated their site with new versions of 3DMark06 and PCMark05. The updates bring not only a few bug fixes, but added support for Windows Vista. Benchmarks native to Windows Vista should be out in 2007, and will take advantage of the latest DirectX features. "To support performance analysis on PC's running Microsoft(R) Windows Vista operating system Futuremark's 3DMark06 and PCMark05 will be Vista enabled. Updated benchmark performance results on Windows Vista systems have been tested and verified by Futuremark as valid and fully comparable. Next generation... Read more...
We've been poking around at a new version of SiSoftware's SANDRA benchmark suite and came across some data that we think many of you will be interested in.  Recently we gave you a look at the fantastic performance of Intel's new Core 2 Extreme QX6700 quad-core processor.  In that launch article we couldn't confirm lower speed bins or model numbers of future quad-core CPUs from Intel but it seems the good folks at SiSoftware have...    As you can see, though unconfirmed in our launch article, it looks as though Intel will be bringing out a 2.4GHz Core 2 Quad Q6600 and a 2.13GHz Core 2 Quad Q6400.  We'd say opt for that Q6400 and overclock it of course.... Read more...
Kevin Kelly's Cool Tool review of Wacom's Cintq monitor/tablet is full of complaints. It's too expensive. It's too heavy. Too Bulky. But after drawing right on the screen, like a pen and ink photoshop, the Cintq gets the ultimate good review: I should have bought one years ago. Based on comics master Scott McCloud's recommendation (below), I bought a Cintiq. It does something I've always wanted to do since I first saw a computer. This thing is a pen-based tablet that doubles as a monitor. In other words you draw directly on the tablet, just like a paper-based drawing, but digitally. In fact the surface of the Cintq monitor/tablet... Read more...
There's a lot of smart hardware in your house already. Unfortunately, they're mostly dumb as a brick when it comes to communicating with each other. So Nobu has a new touchscreen in-wall computer to integrate all those disparate technological marvels you've got available to you right now, if you could just find the remotes: The new 8" panel is a fully functional inwall touchscreen PC with all necessary input/output ports to control any subsystem or automation hardware in your home or office. Our goal with the new design is to satisfy a large demand for a smaller inwall touchpanel as well as to create the most robust, powerful, and... Read more...
Nobu has just released a new inwall touchscreen computer that's bound to get the home automation crowd to sit up and take notice. It's fanless, so it won't annoy you when you use it for application like home theatre or office, and with a 1.0 GHz Intel Celeron onboard, it's not a toy. The new 8" panel is a fully functional inwall touchscreen PC with all necessary input/output ports to control any subsystem or automation hardware in your home or office. Our goal with the new design is to satisfy a large demand for a smaller inwall touchpanel as well as to create the most robust, powerful, and visually appealing touchscreen on the... Read more...
Well, they had the 39th annual Tokyo Auto Show the other day, and Toyota set hearts aflutter with their "i-swing" personal mobility concept car. Now, the skeptical among you might notice that the squarest of squares seem to think they can place a lower case " i " in front of anything and sell it to the skinny eyeglass set. But this is the greatest concept since the Segway, isn't it? Toyota's single-seat electric car resembles a soft cuddly armchair on three wheels and comes with a virtual "friend" programmed inside that learns the driver's tastes and personality. Japanese automaker Toyota Motor Corp. says its "i-swing," which can be seen zipping around on a stage... Read more...
There is a great article on-line at acmqueue.com detailing the past, present, and potential future methods by which humans interact with computers.  They cover advances made at Xerox's PARC and speculate about future technologies like perceptual interfaces.  I don't know about all of you, but give me a good wireless laser-mouse and a clicky keyboard and I'm all set. "Personal computing launched with the IBM PC. But popular computing - computing for the masses - launched with the modern WIMP (windows, icons, mouse, pointer) interface, which made computers usable by ordinary people. As popular computing has grown, the role... Read more...
Last year the Hard Drive manufacturing industry started releasing drives with perpendicular recording technology, in an effort to maintain a steady growth in disk capacity. Of course, while the new technology is certainly welcomed, it's only a temporary fix. The race is still on to develop new technology to further increase drive capacity, with "heat-assisted magnetic recording", and "patterned media" being two viable options. "Perpendicular hard drive technology, which started appearing last year, currently lets manufacturers increase drive density, or the amount of data stored, by around 50 percent annually. But that pace of progress will likely sputter in about four... Read more...
 Intel Teams With Top Universities for Software-Related Research, Curriculum for Future Multi-Core Processors 45 Universities Worldwide Will Offer Multi-Threading Courses to Equip Students to Take Advantage of Multi-Core Platforms SANTA CLARA, Calif., Aug. 7, 2006 - Intel Corporation today announced a global effort to prepare university students for a new paradigm of software development as Intel transitions its processors from single-processor engines to ones that will have multiple cores and threads. This evolution will transform software design and require entirely new thinking and innovation in order to leverage this kind of processing power. As part of its higher education program,... Read more...
When Microsoft's new version of Internet Explorer ships later this year, it will be set to automatically download its self as a 'high priority' update for Windows XP. Microsoft is quick to point to the improved security the browser should offer. It's not a required update though, you can still opt out of downloading it. "IE 7 will be the first major update to Microsoft's ubiquitous Web browser in five years. Security was the No. 1 investment for the update, Microsoft has said. Critics have likened predecessor IE 6 to "Swiss cheese" because of the many security vulnerabilities in it. A third and final beta of IE 7 was released... Read more...
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