Items tagged with drivers

It'd be a gross understatement to say that retro gaming has experienced something of a renaissance in recent years. Nintendo's NES Classic and SNES Classic mini-consoles or the Switch Online's NES and SNES catalogs might be the first thing that comes to mind when you think about older games, but the House of Mario is hardly alone. Sony stumbled into the retro scene last year, and both the Sega Genesis and NEC TurboGrafx-16 (by way of rights-holder Konami) will get their respective official love letters shortly. We'd be remiss, however, if we didn't think about the technology at the heart of all of these fun old games—good old software-based emulation. If it wasn't for SNES9x or Gens,... Read more...
Intel is pushing out a new graphics driver with support for integer scaling, a feature that could come in handy when playing retro video games. Appropriately enough, Intel is calling the feature "Retro Scaling" in its Graphics Command Center utility. This is intended to make classic (read: old) PC games render better on today's higher resolution displays. "We're listening to our community. You wanted a way to experience pixel-art games at their best so we created Retro Scaling. Enhance the latest indie releases and timeless classics so they look their best on modern HD displays," Intel explains. At its best, Retro Scaling can take a blurry or fuzzy image and restore the graphics to their pixelated... Read more...
There are two main trains of thought when it comes to updating drivers. One is to always install them right away to ensure you are protected from the latest threats, and that everything is working as intended. The second is to wait a bit to make sure there are not any unintended side effects, like sending your system into a reboot loop (it happens). If you prescribe to the latter philosophy and own a GeForce GPU, you may still want to go ahead and install the latest driver package rather than wait any longer. NVIDIA began pushing out its GeForce 430.64 WHQL driver package last Thursday (May 9), which delivered 'Game Ready' optimizations for Rage 2, Total War: Three Kingdoms, and World War Z,... Read more...
NVIDIA has launched a new set of graphics drivers aimed specifically at creators who use programs like Adobe Photoshop and Blender Cycles. Appropriately called "Creator Ready" drivers, these will exist alongside NVIDIA's "Game Ready" driver packages that are optimized for gaming and often tuned for the latest game releases. Similar to how AMD maintains two separate sets of graphics drivers—regular and Pro version of its Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition—NVIDIA now has two sets as well. Both contain the full feature set and application support for games, so users can choose either driver they wish, depending on which they do more often—play games or create content. The primary... Read more...
AMD may have hit a home run with its Zen architecture, but when graphics are thrown into the mix, there is definitely room for improvement. One of the big complaints with AMD's Ryzen Mobile products is that graphics drivers are slow to roll out. It's drawn so much attention that AMD has now publicly acknowledged the issue, and promises to do better in the near future. Driver releases are an important part of any product that requires or benefits from custom tailored drivers (versus generic ones), and it is especially critical when dealing with enthusiasts, gamers, and graphics professionals. That's why the situation has been so disappointing with Ryzen Mobile, an otherwise exciting product that... Read more...
In a move that is sure to disrupt the gaming industry and throw the tech community into a state of chaos, it appears AMD is discontinuing 32-bit driver support for its GPUs. Oh no, right? Right!? Kidding aside, this is not going to have a big impact on Radeon users at large, though it's worth noting for anyone who is still clinging to a 32-bit version of Windows. For everyone else? No need to panic, folks. You may have noticed this already. A visit to AMD's graphics drivers page shows that only 64-bit versions of Windows and a spattering of Linux distributions are supported with the latest release, that being Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition 18.10.1. The end of the road for 32-bit support was... Read more...
Sit down for this, we have some shocking news. Are you ready for it? An independent testing firm hired by AMD to evaluate the stability of GPU drivers has determined that AMD builds the most stable graphics drivers in the industry. Through a series of tests, AMD's GPU drivers were shown to fail far less than frequently than NVIDIA's drivers. AMD commissioned QA Consultants, a software testing and quality assurance solutions company based in Toronto, Canada, to evaluate the graphics drivers of both companies in a sort of head-to-head match up. Obviously there is cause to raise an eyebrow when a company with vested interests in the results is the one paying for the analysis. That doesn't necessarily... Read more...
One of the keys to success is developing good habits. Intel, the most successful semiconductor company on the planet, knows a thing or two about this, though up to this point the company hasn't been all that successful in its attempts to crack the discrete graphics market. That might change with the arrival of Arctic Sound, a discrete GPU that will purportedly take aim at gaming (among other segments). In the meantime, Intel has released another GPU driver update with gaming optimizations, and in the process is developing a habit that could serve the company well down the line. Just as AMD and NVIDIA are known to launch new GPU drivers when new games arrive, Intel has begun doing the same thing.... Read more...
A few days ago, AMD started pushing out a new Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition 18.4.1 driver release that, according to the release notes, introduced support for the April 2018 Update for Windows 10. Other than a handful of bug fixes, there didn't appear to be anything else special about the latest driver package—no game optimizations and no additional features, or so we thought. While not listed in the release notes, AMD's latest GPU drivers enable streaming 4K Ultra HD video from Netflix on your PC. The added functionality was first spotted by Hardware.info, which noticed that latest driver release has built-in support for Microsoft's PlayReady 3.0, a digital rights management (DRM)... Read more...
The time has come for gamers and enthusiasts to ditch their 32-bit operating system (assuming you haven't already), because NVIDIA has announced that it will no longer support drivers for these operating systems. If you have been hobbling along on an old 32-bit version of an OS to save some money, perhaps Santa can bring you a 64-bit OS. NIVIDIA says that support will end after the 390 driver release. NVIDIA writes, "Later driver release versions will not operate, nor install, on 32-bit operating systems. Driver enhancements, driver optimizations, and operating system features in driver versions after Release 390 will not be incorporated back into Release 390 or earlier versions. This impacts... Read more...
Just last week, AMD rolled out a Crimson ReLive software update in preparation for its official unveiling of Radeon RX Vega graphics cards for consumers, which it announced over the weekend at SIGGRAPH. Now it is doing the same for new professional grade Vega cards that were introduced as well, and with it comes some nifty features. Perhaps the most noteworthy feature upgrade that AMD's Radeon Pro Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.8 brings to professionals is driver switching. Here is the thing—professional graphics cards based on Vega are fully capable of playing games, but the driver packages they run on are tuned for work-level applications, not pumping out fast framerates in games. This... Read more...
AMD is heading into 2017 with a major new graphics driver refresh called Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition, or Radeon ReLive for short. Even better, we'll just call it ReLive from here on out. More than a name change or yet another incremental update, this is a complete retooling of Crimson right down to the user interface. There are several highlights to the new driver family, as this is AMD's biggest driver release ever, but it's the new built-in video capture and streaming tool (ReLive) that it is named after. Having kicked its Gaming Evolved app to the curb, AMD has gone and integrated a DVR solution solution for capturing and sharing epic gaming moments. "Capture, stream and share your... Read more...
AMD is working on a driver fix that will address the power draw of the Radeon RX 480, its first Polaris part and a graphics card we determined is easily the best value in its price segment (see our full review for more in-depth coverage). The driver, Radeon Software 16.7.1, is in the final testing stage and will release to the public within the next 48 hours, AMD said in the wee hours of the morning. The Radeon RX 480 was designed to give gamers a potent and affordable option for VR gaming. Pricing starts at $199 for the 4GB model and $239 for the 8GB variant, both of which represent excellent price-to-performance ratios. However, it was recently discovered that the Radeon RX 480 was pulling... Read more...
Late last year, Raja Koduri and crew, at the AMD Radeon Technologies Group launched the Radeon Software Crimson Edition software suite and publicly committed to improving the company’s software and drivers. In a video AMD RTG posted at the time of the initial announcement, Raja Koduri and Terry “Catalyst Maker” Makedon explained that in the two decades or so that the company has been developing graphics drivers, they've evolved well beyond the device driver alone. "Now we have user interfaces, libraries, tools, applications, packaged as what we call drivers. The software has morphed into a mini graphics Operating System", they said.Put simply, the complexities of graphics driver development have... Read more...
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