Items tagged with chassis

Corsair has rolled out a new case that might be perfect for the PC gamer or enthusiast out there who wants to cram a huge amount of hardware into the chassis. The case is called the Obsidian Series 1000D and it is constructed from four smoked tempered glass panels. The case has RGB lighting on the front and you can see all the fancy hardware inside thanks to the glass panels. One of the most interesting aspects of the giant chassis is that it has enough room inside for a complete E-ATX and Mini-ITX computer system, PSU and all. Two complete PCs would allow you to stream video from one machine and play games on the other at the same time. With space enough for two complete computers inside one... Read more...
We’ve seen our share of wild chassis designs, and Lian Li is giving the world another with the DK01, which is a chassis that serves double duty as a PC case and a desk, which brings new meaning to the phrase, “sitting at your computer”. The funky DK01 looks like a brushed-metal chassis turned on its side and mounted on legs and the surface is a solid piece of tempered glass. The power button and some USB 3.0 ports and audio jacks are on the front side of the case, to the right of where the user would sit. It’s unclear where the rear I/O ports are stashed. Lian Li DK01 The DK01 seems like a brilliant DIY mod, but Lian Li has applied its spit and polish to the idea which... Read more...
Sometimes a case is a case is a case, but Origin PC is pushing the envelope with a new desktop gaming PC chassis that promises something different. The company’s new Genesis and Millenium desktop case boasts a key feature called Variable Mounting that allows you to mount the motherboard in any of four different orientations. Basically, you can put your motherboard in a standard orientation, rotate it 90 degrees so that graphics cards are facing the sky, invert it in that 90-degree orientation so that you use the other side panel for access, or invert the standard orientation in such a way that the graphics cards are topmost instead of on the bottom. Thus, you can set up your rig however... Read more...
Lian Li makes some killer cases, but the company is not above gathering input from users on designs and features. The latest chassis it’s soliciting feedback on is the prototype for the PC-A51, which is in the same line as the PC-A05N. As it stands, the PC-A51 is a nice-looking case, sporting a black-and-red look that combines clean lines with pops of color. Key features include support for 240/280mm radiators, 30mm of space behind the motherboard tray for better cable management, a tool-less HDD bay system, and a front-mounted PSU designed to let users take more advantage of the available space. There’s also a huge clear window so you can see all the hot hardware inside. The PC-A51... Read more...
Over the past few years, Corsair has steadily ramped up the number and types of computer chassis it manufacturers. The high-end 700D and 800D have been followed by a number of midrange products and one uber-expensive deluxe model, the massive 900D. The case we're reviewing today, the 750D, is meant to drop into the $200 price bracket, where it faces competition from Corsair's own 650D mid-tower as well as a number of other chassis from manufacturers that offer products at similar or somewhat cheaper price points. Despite the name, the 750D is actually somewhat smaller than the original 700D/800D family. Those chassis were 24 inches long, 24 inches tall, and 9 inches wide, while the 750D... Read more...
Over the past few years, Corsair has steadily ramped up the number and types of computer chassis it manufacturers. The high-end 700D and 800D have been followed by a number of midrange products and one uber-expensive deluxe model, the massive 900D. The case we're reviewing today, the 750D, is meant to drop into the sub-$200 price bracket, where it faces competition from Corsair's own 650D mid-tower as well as a number of other chassis from manufacturers. Despite the name, the 750D is actually somewhat smaller than the original 700D/800D family. Those chassis were 24 inches long, 24 inches tall, and 9 inches wide, while the 750D is 21.5 inches long, 22.1 inches tall, and 9.3 inches wide. The other... Read more...
If you love building computers, you probably appreciate a good case or chassis. While there are plenty of excellent products available for a song, there’s also an upper echelon of models that cost quite a bit and offer all the premiere features you could hope for. While it seems as though there’s a lot of similarity between low-end and midrange cases, once you get to a certain price point, various companies take things in very different directions. The three premium chassis we’re looking at in this roundup certainly bear that out. In Win, Lian Li, and SilverStone all make some beautiful cases. And when we asked them to send us one of their top of the line products, they all... Read more...
If you love building computers, you probably appreciate a good case or chassis. While there are plenty of excellent products available for a song, there’s also an upper echelon of models that cost quite a bit and offer all the premiere features you could hope for. While it seems as though there’s a lot of similarity between low-end and midrange cases, once you get to a certain price point, various companies take things in very different directions. The three premium chassis we’re looking at in this roundup certainly bear that out. In Win, Lian Li, and SilverStone all make some beautiful cases. And when we asked them to send us one of their... Read more...
Lian Li has chosen to move away from the traditional motherboard tray with its latest chassis, the PC-9N. While many chassis today use a solid motherboard tray that blocks airflow, the PC-9N uses a railing mount design that provides increased thermal performance and better cable management. The PC-9N is a brushed aluminum mid tower chassis that supports ATX and micro-ATX motherboards. The chassis is capable of holding up to three 3.5-inch hard drives and one 2.5-inch SSD in an all aluminum, tool-less, modular drive cage that is located in the lower front of the chassis. To reduce noise and vibrations, the drives are secured using quick-access thumbscrews with rubber suspensions. The hard drive... Read more...
Modularity seems to be a minor theme of late, and NZXT is tapping into that crowd-pleasing potential with the release of the NZXT Phantom 630, the successor to the Phantom 410 and Phantom 820. The ability to alter the configuration of drive bays has long been an occasional and welcome feature on any chassis, but it’s a primary feature of the Phantom 630. The case, which is available in three colors (black, white, and gun metal), offers the ability to completely remove all the bays or just rejigger their configuration depending on what you need. Note that there are three bays, each a different size and one with a rotating fan mount that lets you more intelligently adjust the interior cooling.... Read more...
Lian-Li has a wide selection of computer chassis available supporting virtually every size of motherboard imaginable, but the company is about to release many more. We swung by Lian-Li’s booth at CES to see what’s coming down the pike, and we ended up ogling a whole fleet of all-metal, intriguing cases. All of the cases we saw on display have the same basic look and design: they’re all black, with a brushed metal finish and gray metal interiors. That may sound somewhat dreary, but up close in person, it’s a striking and attractive look. Notably, there are no plastic parts on these cases; the Lian-Li brass reportedly won’t have it. Lian Li PC-V850 One of our favorites... Read more...
Unfortunately, many PC enthusiasts tend to skimp on their chassis when building a new system. After all, you can get a decent case with adequate cooling for next to nothing these days, making a splurge on a $200-plus, premium case seem unnecessary. However, as anyone who’s owned a truly high-end chassis can tell you, it's usually worth the extra money for superior construction along, not to mention the additional features, ample cooling options, and sometimes attractive lighting. In addition, a high-end case is something that can last through multiple upgrade cycles. That’s how the NZXT Phantom 820 is positioned: it's an everything-but-the-kitchen-sink type of chassis, offering all... Read more...
Unfortunately, many PC enthusiasts tend to skimp on the chassis when building a new system. After all, you can get a decent case with adequate cooling for next to nothing these days, making a splurge on a $200-plus, premium case seem unnecessary. However, as anyone who’s owned a truly high-end chassis can tell you, it's usually worth the extra money for superior construction, additional features, ample cooling options, and sometimes attractive lighting. In addition, a high-end case is something that can last through multiple upgrade cycles. That’s how the NZXT Phantom 820 is positioned: it's an everything-but-the-kitchen-sink type of chassis, offering all... Read more...
Lian-Li announced two new brushed aluminum full tower chassis that are designed to hold plenty of hardware in a sleek case. The PC-A75X and the PC-A76X both support HPTX, EATX, ATX, and Micro-ATX motherboards and offer the same internal design. The key difference between the cases is the external style. The PC-A75X offers a vented front panel that can be removed without tools. Two 5.25-inch bays are accessible from the front of this chassis. The PC-A76X employs a more monolithic design with a lockable solid aluminum front bezel door that covers the fans and the 5.25-inch bays. This case uses vents on the side of the door and at the bottom of the chassis to supply adequate airflow. PC-A75X (left),... Read more...
1 2 3 4 5 Next ... Last