Items tagged with Work

In my daily jaunt across the web, I stumbled across this link to an article on Microsoft's website that deals with the quality of a wireless network. There are a couple of useful tips in this article, along with some common sense suggestions.  Either way, some good information for those of you looking to get the most from your WiFi. "If Microsoft Windows XP ever notifies you about a weak signal, it probably means your connection isn't as fast or as reliable as it could be. Worse, you might lose your connection entirely in some parts of your home. If you're looking to improve the signal for your wireless network, try some of these tips... Read more...
Intel Aligns New Technologies To Enhance PC Network Management Capabilities New Products from Intel, Microsoft Build on New Industry Management Specifications SANTA CLARA, Calif., March 19, 2007 - Intel Corporation will make managing business PC networks less costly and simpler by aligning Intel vPro technology with the newly released versions of Microsoft* System Center* management solutions and incorporating new PC management standards. The next generation of Intel vPro technology (codenamed "Weybridge") will add support for the new Web Services Management (WS-MAN) standard and include new Intel Active Management Technology features to reduce the spread of viruses and worms. In addition,... Read more...
AMD has been working very hard for several years now to catch up to Intel when it comes to developing and perfecting new manufacturing process technology. New process technology allows more transistors to be packed into the same physical area, which can relate to more features and performance in a given chip and/or more chips per material used. So there is either more performance, better price, or both, and what customer can resist better prices and/or better performance? AMD has done a good job of narrowing the gap, but Intel really pulled out all the stops to get both their 65 nm and 45 nm processes up and running well ahead of AMD. According to Reuters, it seems like AMD might be seeking outside... Read more...
Symantec estimates that computer hijackings have risen 30% in the last year. Crackers hijack computers in order to send out spam e-mails, viruses, and other malicious software and according to further studies from Symantec, more then a third of attacks in the second half of 2006 originated from within the United States. While the number of hijackings continues to increase, research indicates that the number of servers controlling 'bot networks' is decreasing. According to Symantec, bot network owners are beginning to consolidate servers in order to create a more centralized center for deploying malicious software. The number of computers... Read more...
Microsoft Office costs a ransom. Google Apps is so "Beta" you might as well program it yourself. A useful, inexpensive web-based productivity suite is perhaps the most intensely desired vaporware in the history of ones and zeros. Well, Adventnet thinks they've got the answer, and they call their online/offline compatible suite Zoho. Slate magazine took a look: While they don't replicate every function of their Microsoftian counterparts, Zoho's programs are highly evolved by online standards. Zoho Writer, for instance, handles basic graphics and lists with aplomb, incorporates tools for Web-page design and blogging, and offers multiple... Read more...
So, you think you have the most impressive home office workstation this side of the galaxy? Before you say yes, you have to see what Stefan Didak set up in his home.  Up to 9 screens, numerous machines, tons of network equipment, storage galore, and even an Amiga 1000 thrown in for good measure. "The pictures on this page are of my home office desktop which, since I first published these pictures, have been causing a lot of chatter on various web forums and blogs. The attention my home office has received is quite stunning and way more than I would have expected." There are a ton of pics... Read more...
BigFoot Networks, the makers of the Killer Network Interface Card, have launched a new, more affordable version of the product.  The first Killer NIC, aka the M1, sells for roughly $250. It is equipped with a 400MHz network processing unit, a large "K" heatsink, 64MB of DDR RAM, and a USB 2.0 port for connecting an external flash or hard drive.  The drive is used to store files or FNApps which can be executed on the Killer.  Our complete review of the original Killer NIC can be found here if you'd like some more in-depth analysis. The new Killer K1 NIC is similar to the M1, with a few exceptions. Before we list the differences, let's take a look at the K1 in all... Read more...
Intel sends more details tonight of something we learned a bit about at this past Fall IDF.  We have specific details of the architecture that comprises Intel's mysterious Teraflop 80-Core processor.  This breakthrough comes in the form of a dedicated function circuit but its design and implementation show promise for highly scalable SoC and NoC architectures in the future, with leading edge processes like those that are being developed at Intel's Hillsboro, Oregon facility.    "The ever shrinking size of MOS transistors brings the promise of scalable network-on-chip (NoC) architectures containing hundreds of integrated processing elements with on-chip communication.... Read more...
The Wall Street Journal has the skinny on the resurgence of "thin clients" in the workplace. And no, by "thin clients," they're not talking about being a clerk in an anorexia clinic. A new generation of simplified devices -- most often called "thin clients" or "simple terminals" -- is gaining popularity with an increasing number of companies and other computer users in the U.S., Europe and Asia. The stripped-down machines from Wyse Technology Inc., Neoware Inc., Hewlett-Packard Co. and others let users perform such tasks as word processing or accessing the Internet at their desks just as they did with their personal computers.... Read more...
New Intel Wireless Product for Laptops Extends Networking Speed and Range New Compatibility Program for Intel Centrino Users with Wireless-N SANTA CLARA, Calif., Jan. 23, 2007 - Intel Corporation today introduced the Intel Next-Gen Wireless-N network connection, an upgrade to the wireless component found inside Intel Centrino Duo mobile technology and other Intel-based laptops that helps consumers better connect to wireless networks. As notebook PCs increasingly download broadband-intense content such as movies, videos and music, a more powerful networking solution is needed. Based on the draft 802.11n Wi-Fi specification, the Intel Next-Gen Wireless-N technology addresses that need by offering... Read more...
The Wii controller is sweeping the nation, while a portion of the nation is sweeping up the glass from broken things when you accidentally let go of it. But how do they work? Scienceline explains the advances in accelerometer technology, and how the Wii controller made them work for fun. The accelerometers used in the Nintendo controller are thinner than a penny, small enough to fit twelve on a postage stamp, and sell for under $6 a piece. They can accurately measure forces more than three times stronger than the pull of gravity in three directions - up and down, side to side, and forward and back. The chips also use gravity to determine the orientation of the controller, whether you're holding... Read more...
This has to be the most ironic twist to ever come out for the gaming console industry.  And it makes perfect sense when you stop to think about how the folks at Nintendo have utterly nailed this release of their latest console with the most disruptive and groundbreaking innovation this market has seen in years.  Go figure... Now it actually pays to get in shape for video gaming? Believe it. Whether your lunging at volleys and serves or slashing at evil villains, you better start thinking about getting that body by lazy-boy physique into gear.  Or you just may lose your edge, all of it...    "In Rochester, Minn., Jeremy Scherer and his wife spent three hours playing tennis... Read more...
The folks at VR-Zone have posted a rumor that ATI is currently reworking the already delayed R600 GPU in an effort to minimize PCB size and get a better handle on thermals. Supposedly already at a staggering 12" in length, the original PCB layout is easily one of the longest graphics cards in history. The obvious goal here is to design a PCB which will be at least as "short" as the GeForce 8800 GTX, though there are some considerable design hurdles to overcome to do so. In addition, the team will be utilizing this time to further increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the heatsink assembly to keep the hot new GPU running cool. With the GeForce 8800 GTX... Read more...
DigiTimes reports that Gigabyte will be transferring its motherboard and graphics card division over to the new joint venture with ASUS called Gigabyte United Incorporated. From January 2007 on, the joint venture will avoid competition between the two Tier-I vendors and allow the joint venture to utilize the resources of each company. Despite the fact that the retail motherboard and graphics card business will be heading towards the joint venture, Gigabyte will remain a key ODM partner for outsourced graphics card and motherboard production. Gigabyte United will have permanent and exclusive licensed use of the Gigabyte brand and trademark... Read more...
Fudo over at The Inquirer reports that NVIDIA has begin designing their own CPU architecture. Based out of the new design center in Portland, Oregon the new architecture will serve as the foundation for the company's upcoming merged CPU/GPU products. At this time, the rumor mill expects the first products from these efforts to hit the market in 2008. Unfortunately, little is known whether NVIDIA's CPU architecture will be limited strictly to "merged" CPU/GPU designs or if they are aiming to do battle across all levels with AMD and Intel. With Microsoft also taking steps to design their own CPU architecture, it is not too wild an idea to imagine NVIDIA offering... Read more...
The NY Times has posted an extremely interesting article regarding Microsoft's new efforts to design their own CPU. To this end, Microsoft has formed what is tentatively known as the "Computer Architecture Group" and will utilize resources from both the Redmond headquarters and Santa Clara campus. Although many will be quick to assume Microsoft is gearing to do battle with Intel and AMD on the PC front, there is a distinct possibility that Microsoft's true goal with this effort is to tackle the consumer electronics market in general. Looking at the scalability of Sony's Cell architecture and its ability to be used in everything from the Playstation 3 to televisions... Read more...
Hello Everyone. We've just posted a review of Bigfoot Networks' Killer NIC here at HotHardware.com. We explore framerate performance and ping times and discuss the underlying hardware and technology employed on the Killer. Here's a snip from the piece: "By now, we're all familiar with Creative Labs' Audigy and X-Fi audio processors. A startup known as AISeek is working on an Artificial Intelligence accelerator for the PC. Ageia's PhysX processor is already on store shelves, and the product we'll be looking at today, the Killer NIC, is designed to offload some network functions from the CPU. Bigfoot Networks' Killer NIC is more than... Read more...
There has been a lot of talk within the industry of consolidation as of late. AMD's acquisition of ATI has been a hot topic ever since it was announced.  And that acquisition has spurred rumors of an unlikely merger between Intel and NVIDIA. Both AMD and Intel have talked about integrating a GPU on to the CPU in one form or another, Seagate bought Maxtor, Asus and Gigabyte entered into a strategic partnership, and the list goes on and on. Despite all the talk about consolidation, however, there are still quite a few companies that are pushing for more dedicated co-processing processing elements in the PC architecture. By now, we're all familiar with Creative Lab's Audigy and X-Fi audio... Read more...
Cortina Systems Purchases Intel's Optical-Networking Components Business SANTA CLARA, Calif., Sep. 11, 2006 - Cortina Systems Inc. and Intel Corporation today announced that they have completed the sale of product lines and associated assets of Intel's optical-networking components business to Cortina. Cortina has emerged as a leading supplier of advanced communications semiconductor solutions for the carrier infrastructure market segment. The acquisition will give Cortina a large portfolio of enterprise and infrastructure communications products and will position it to become a leading communications semiconductor company. The sale will enable Intel to focus its investments on its core... Read more...
YouTube.com has seen tremendous growth since its start back in February of 1995, thanks in part to its ability to let anyone become the star of their own show. Television network NBC has certainly taken notice of the service's popularity, as they've decided to resurrect a dead sitcom pilot into a new show for the 2006-07 schedule, based on its popularity on YoutTube. "At about the same time, NBC and YouTube forged a strategic partnership that, among other things, lets NBC hype its fall shows on YouTube. What more proof do you need of new media's appeal than when the mainstream media jumps on board? NBC is learning one of the new rules... Read more...
The folks in the XtremeSystems forum have posted some images of the new ASUS P5W64 WS Pro workstation motherboard. The most unique aspect of this new board is the presence of four PCI-E x16 slots. Obviously, the first thing our readers will think of is coming up with a way to get two ATI "Master" cards and two standard cards and try for a Quad-Crossfire setup. Time will tell if drivers will allow this to function properly. However, in the meantime the gang is having a great time pushing the limits of the board and have managed to hit an impressive 472MHz FSB in their overclocking adventures. Although it might not be the ideal board for most, this unique motherboard will certainly be... Read more...
Microsoft can't seem to catch a break when it comes to operating system security. The classic complaint has been that their operating systems are bloated with legacy code that have been passed down from one version of Windows to another, all in the name of backwards compatibility. Microsoft is finally doing something about it by completely rewriting key parts of Windows Vista from the ground up, including the network stack. They hope the new code will make Vista more secure and harder to exploit than previous Windows operating systems, at the cost of binary compatibility with legacy code. Despite their efforts, Microsoft is now under fire from Symantec who published a report... Read more...
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