Items tagged with Study

Text messaging has been a popular form of communication for teens for quite some time now, but adults are catching the craze as well. A new study from the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project reveals that 72 percent of adult cell phone users now send and receive text messages. This represents an increase from 65 percent in September 2009, and 58 percent in December 2007. The Cell Phones and American Adults report also shows that 87 percent of teens use their phones for text messaging.  Although adults may be catching the texting bug, teens still send and receive the most messages: teens average 50 messages a day compared to the 10 messages most adults send and... Read more...
It already happened in the home, and now it's happening on college campuses everywhere: landline phones are vanishing. With the proliferation of cellphones, it has made it harder and harder for landline services to prove necessary. Even VoIP-based services such as digital phone from a cable company or Vonage seem limited in use, with the only true benefit being cheap/free calling overseas. But with the iPhone able to handle cheap Skype Out calls now, even that point is becoming moot. There's no question that landline use has been declining in the home while mobile use has been on the rise, and it's only a matter of time before the landline as we know takes a very secondary position in our hierarchy... Read more...
According to J.D. Power and Associates' recently released eighth annual U.S. Wireless Customer Care Performance Study, T-Mobile tops other top U.S. wireless carriers in overall customer care. T-Mobile received a ranking of 777 out of a possible 1,000 points. The study is based on a survey of 9,690 wireless customers who contacted their carrier's customer service department over the past six months. AT&T followed T-Mobile with a score of 757, followed by Verizon Wireless (749) and Sprint (734). According to the survey, the industry average is 753. The report is based on how well the carriers were able to assist their customers via telephone, through in-store visits, or on the Web. Although... Read more...
AT&T revealed that many US companies are showing a great deal of interest in Apple's iPad. According to the wireless carrier, some businesses are even considering replacing employee laptops with the tablet computer. When the iPhone debuted three years ago, many businesses were reluctant to adopt the phone. Today however, businesses seem to be showing no hesitation when it comes to the iPad said AT&T chief financial officer Richard Lindner. As with the iPhone, AT&T is the exclusive 3G carrier for the iPad in the United States. In a conference call with analysts, Lindner said, "When we first introduced the iPhone, businesses and CIOs of our business customers were reluctant….They... Read more...
According to a recent wireless study by the Nielsen Co., the typical smartphone user consumes less than 300MB of data each month. This figure represents an increase of about 230 percent compared to last year's figure. Considering the increasing popularity of data-intensive mobile services such as video chat and Hulu streaming services, we have to expect that mobile data use will continue to rise. The Nielsen Co. sorted through about 60,000 mobile bills to discover that the average smartphone user was consuming about 298MB of data each month. As you may recall, AT&T recently unveiled new, tiered data plans. The lowest tier offers only 200MB of data for $15 per month. Although this allotment... Read more...
Summer is upon us and many people are planning to pack up their cars and take some time off for a vacation. The thing is, most of us won't truly be taking a break from it all. According to the Mobile Messaging Study conducted by Osterman Research, 79 percent of respondents take work-related devices with them on vacation. Given the number of email messages many of us receive each day, it's no wonder people find it easier to keep up with messages when we're away on vacation rather than come back to an overwhelming pile of email when we return to the office. Some people also check email out of fear: According to CareerBuilder's 2009 vacation survey, nearly one in five workers are afraid of losing... Read more...
Credit an increasing amount of cell phone towers, the explosion of high-end Android smartphones, or just all around improvements to customer service, but whatever the reason(s), consumers are more happy than ever with their cell phone service, suggests a new study. The American Customer Satisfaction Index for "Wireless Telephone Service" now sits at 72 on a 100 point scale, the highest it's ever been since the score was first tracked in 2004. With the exception of AT&T, which scored a 69, every major carrier was represented by a score of 70 or above. But it was Sprint that made the biggest improvement. Despite what some would consider a mass exodus to greener pastures in recent years, Sprint... Read more...
According to data reported by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in four households has traded in their landline telephone for a cell phone. As you may expect, this trend is increasing. In the beginning of 2006, just 11 percent of homes had only a cell and no landline. This move away from traditional landline phones has had a far-reaching effect. Telephone companies are not the only ones affected, either. Polling firms and government agencies that gather data also face additional challenges as a result of the decrease in landlines. Additionally, 911 service providers have had to find additional options when it comes to locating people who are in need of help. Today, just... Read more...
According to a recent study from Duke University, the use of TiVo and other DVRs hasn’t hurt television advertising or changed consumers’ buying behavior. In fact, Carl Mela, a professor in Duke’s Fuqua School of Business, said the ability to fast-forward through commercials has had no effect on buying behavior. Mela also noted that not as many people fast-forward through television commercials as originally thought. Years ago, some people thought that digital video recorders such as a TiVo, which lets users record TV programs and make it easy to fast-forward through commercials, would kill TV commercials all together. That's obviously not the case today: If you watch TV for... Read more...
When it comes to downloading software applications, music, video, and other entertainment content from mobile devices other than home computers, iPhone and iPod Touch users lead the pack. According to the NPD Group’s "Entertainment Trends in America" update, 75 percent of iPhone and iPod Touch users are connecting to the Web to download entertainment content and apps. By comparison, only 19 percent of game console users and 17 percent of Blu-ray Disc (BD) set-top product users are downloading content. “It’s not surprising that Apple users are ahead of others when it comes to downloading Web-based content, given the breadth of the company’s app catalog and the head start... Read more...
We've seen this problem before. Internet addiction has become a serious issue in some of the more well-connected nations, with South Korea, the UK and even China setting up Internet addiction therapy clinics in order to help people curb their use of the Web and re-connect with the real humans around them. So far, there hasn't been too much talk of a similar epidemic in the United States, but a new study is shedding light on what some would say is an obvious problem. Today, U.S. college students are more connected than ever, with near-everywhere Wi-Fi, always-on smartphones and a good excuse to be online most of the day (studying, of course!). Researchers at the University of Maryland surveyed... Read more...
At last. We were beginning to wonder when a full-scale, no-holds barred cell phone study would be launched to investigate the pros (but mostly cons) of using a mobile long-term, and it seems that 2010 is the year. Small-scale studies have been conducted ever since wireless phones became a commodity, but up until now, no company had decided to study things long-term. It's being called the biggest study on cell phone health effects ever, and any study that will take three decades to complete probably qualifies for "biggest." The Cohort Study on Mobile Communications (COSMOS) has begun a thirty year look on how the long-term use of cell phones effects disease and health, with cancer and neurological... Read more...
This won't come as much of a revelation, but teens love to text. A lot. So much so, in fact, that texting is fast becoming the preferred method of communication, suggests a new study by Pew Internet. According to the study, American teens between the ages of 12 and 17 are more apt to text message their friends than they are to call, email, send an IM, talk on the phone, or chat through a social networking site. Hang out at a local high school (actually, don't do that, it's kind of creepy) and you'll discover that some 75 percent of teens now carry a cell phone. That's up from 45 percent in 2004, and the vast majority of those cell phone toting teens are whipping text messages back and forth.... Read more...
According to a recent survey from Arbitron and Edison Research, nearly half of Americans age 12 and older have a profile on one or more social networking Web sites. The study also revealed that the use of social networking sites is not limited to youth: Approximately 78% of teens and 77% of 18 to 24-year-olds have personal profile pages. Nearly two-thirds of Americans between the ages of 25 and 34 have personal profile pages. Not only are more people using social networking sites in general, but they're also using them more frequently. The study suggests that 30% of Americans with a social networking profile access the social networking Web site several times a day. One year ago, only 18% of... Read more...
How often do you feel compelled to log into Facebook or Twitter and see what your friends are up to? An even bigger question is, would you ever shove your partner away during an intimate moment to see what's happening in your online world? If so, you're not only addicted to social networking, your priorities are also way out of whack.According to a recent study by Retrevo Inc., an online electronics vendor and review site, social networking may be more habit forming than you imagined."The latest Retrevo Gadgetology study asked social media users questions such as when, where, and how much time they spend on sites and services like Facebook and Twitter. We were not surprised to learn how many... Read more...
While netbooks have become more popular and helped set new pricing standards for portable computers, they're unlikely to replace laptops anytime soon, according to a new survey.  The study was done by PriceGrabber.com, a division of Experian, which is perhaps best known for its credit reporting arm.One of the key findings was that even among netbook users, perhaps only a quarter consider a netbook to be an acceptable replacement for a laptop. Some other main points:Online consumers who owned a netbook in December 2008 increased from 10 percent to 15 percent in December 2009. And 11 percent plan to purchase one in 2010, though it's not clear if that was an additional 11 percent.65 percent... Read more...
Though it likely doesn't come as a huge shock to anyone, the amount of time that 8- to 18-year-olds spend engrossed in entertainment media of some sort or another — TV, music, Internet, video games, movies and even (GASP!) print — has increased dramatically over the past five years.In fact, on average, the young'uns are spending as much time focusing on entertainment daily as the average adult does at work. Even more, if you consider the average work week is just five days, while this is spread over seven days, the Kaiser Family Foundation found in its most recent study. Here's a quick breakdown of some of the key findings: 7 hours and 38 minutes: Amount of time devoted to entertainment media... Read more...
While distracted driving has certainly received a lot of attention lately, other distractions could also be dangerous. Distracted walking, for instance, is becoming another growing problem. Distracted walking combines a pedestrian, an electronic device, and an unseen danger such as a crack in the sidewalk, toy on the floor, or a car (parked or moving). Although most of the injuries that result from distracted walking aren't near as serious as those that may result from distracted driving, the number of injuries are on the rise. Most of the time, the mishaps for distracted walking are minor—a broken fingernail, bumped head, jammed finger, or a sprained ankle. Many distracted walkers also experienced... Read more...
The HDTV business is booming, and even though they aren't nearly as buzz-worthy as they once were, that's clearly not stopping consumers from picking them up. High-def sets have withstood the test of time thus far, with more and more consumers jumping at the chance to upgrade to a flat-panel as each year passes by. Huge events like the Super Bowl, World Cup and Olympics have a tendency to get people thinking about all that resolution they're missing out on, and evidently so does the massive amount of HD programming now available via pay-TV providers.A new study by the Leichtman Research Group has found that "nearly 50% of U.S. households will own a HDTV by the end of the year." Just as a reminder,... Read more...
We've heard numerous arguments to back up both sides of the cell phone radiation debate. Some research indicates they are safe, others disagree. Now, a new study is fueling the argument that cell phones could cause serious side effects. According to a 10-year study from the World Health Organization (WHO), there's a proven link between the long-term use of a cell phone and increased risks for brain cancer and tumors. The study, headed by Dr. Elisabeth Cardis, shows an 18% increase in brain tumor development with long-term cell phone usage. The United States did not participate in the Interphone study but Senator Tom Harkin, the head of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee,... Read more...
According to a recent report from the University of California, San Diego, American households consumed 3.6 zettabytes of information in 2008. A zettabyte is 10 to the 21st power bytes, or a million million gigabytes. Put another way, Americans consumed approximately 34GB per individual per day in 2008. The report also suggests that the average American consumes 100,500 words in a single day. The information we consume comes from everywhere around us—through television, radio, billboards, the Web, text messages, video games, etc. The study suggests that most Americans spend half of their day, or an average of nearly 12 hours, consuming information. Four and a half of those hours are generally... Read more...
We've all heard plenty of statistics that tell us how dangerous it is to talk on our cell phones while driving. Now a new study from the University of Illinois has also found that talking on a cell phone while crossing the street is also dangerous. In fact, it's more dangerous than listening to an MP3 player while crossing the street. (Interestingly enough, the study found that listening to music while crossing a street caused the test subjects little to no distraction.) Through this study, Mark Neider, a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Illinois' Beckman Institute, hopes people will be more conscious of their surroundings and activities. “They should be aware that their ability... Read more...
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