Items tagged with Study

If you're looking for support while trying to stop smoking, an international study suggests text messaging could help. Four trials conducted in New Zealand, Britain, and Norway found that programs to help people stop smoking that included text messages with advice doubled the chances a person would be able to quit smoking for up to a year. The trials involved 2,600 smokers. During the trials, text messages were used as a way to give smokers advice, encouragement, and support. For example, if a user found himself craving nicotine, he could text "crave" to the program and receive advice on what to do. "We know that stopping smoking can be really difficult and most people take several attempts to... Read more...
We've heard facts that claim cell phones are perfectly safe and other pieces of information that say cell phones are dangerous. Now, a new website from ProCon.org is available to help you decide for yourself. Even though the radio frequency (RF) radiation levels in cell phones are regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and generally considered to be safe when used properly, there is still plenty of research that shows cell phone use could cause cancer, disrupt pacemakers, decrease fertility, damage DNA, and increase the risk of traffic accidents. The FCC and other government agencies claim the majority of scientific studies show there are no adverse health effects from cell... Read more...
What is it that keeps you up at night? According to a recent study from Internet security firm Arbor Networks, more Americans have been staying up late to surf the Internet this summer. Compared to previous years when most Internet activity was in the daytime, the study found that the peak usage time for the whole day has recently been at 11 p.m. Eastern time.The study also found that people using the Internet at work and school produce a smaller peak in traffic around 4 p.m. Eastern time on weekdays. Internet activity then declines as people head home. Traffic levels begin to pick up again at 8 p.m. Eastern and stay surprisingly strong past midnight. According to Arbor Networks, overall traffic... Read more...
Own a personal navigation device? Use the GPS on your phone? If you're reading this now, the answer is probably "yes." If you're an avid navigation user, you probably understand the benefits quite well. Rather than having to write down directions to facilities, you simply find the address, plug it in and follow the kind lady on the other end. But have you ever wondered just how much time you save each year by following the GPS? According to a new research study from NAVTEQ, the company responsible for the maps found on a whole slew of GPS devices, the average user can save around four days per year by using a navigation unit. Four days! The study focused on time savings based on the impact that... Read more...
Considering the explosion of layoffs announced in recent weeks, companies would do well to seriously be on guard against data theft. According to a survey that polled some 800 companies in eight countries, 42 percent of firms admitted that laid-off employees were the single largest threat to their data security.The survey, which was unsurprisingly conducted by security / technology firm McAfee, found that businesses overall risk losing over one trillion dollars from "loss or theft of data and other cybercrime." After a so-called "rapid acceleration of malicious software" -- better known by laypersons at malware -- occurred in 2008, McAfee set out to really find what all was at stake. By the numbers,... Read more...
It should be common sense that electronic devices can cause interference with other electronic devices (remember the old pacemaker / microwave problem?). After all, an earlier study about RFID tags interfering with medical devices has been released, and a new study released on Sunday shows that headphones might throw off pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) when placed within an inch of the medical devices. The presentation, titled Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) of Implanted Cardiac Devices by MP3 Player Headphones was shown at the American Heart Association's annual scientific sessions in New Orleans on Sunday. It took a look at the possible interaction between the... Read more...
We recently showed you how Intel was intent on upping the ante in Solid State Disk performance, with our evaluation and performance analysis on the release of their X25-M series SSDs.  Though offerings from other SSD manufacturers like OCZ and Samsung have come to market with better performance since then, there was no question Intel's SSD flat out smoked the competition in the cost-effective, consumer grade MLC (Multi-Level Cell) SSD market. With an average sustained throughput of ~225MB/sec for reads, around 74MB/sec observed write performance, and blistering fast sub-millisecond random access, we were left thoroughly impressed by Intel's first consumer-ready effort in SSD technology. However, at... Read more...
A recent survey of IT professionals reveals that just under half of them (45 percent) were either "not confident or only slightly confident" that they were aware of all the endpoints connecting to their organizations' networks. Perhaps not surprisingly, half of the respondents were also concerned that a security breach on their organizations' networks could jeopardize their employment or that of some of their staff. The study was sponsored by Mirage Networks, a Network Access Control (NAC) provider, and included "194 respondents, representing a variety of IT functions and companies that ranged in size from small businesses with less than 100 endpoints to large enterprises with more than 10,000... Read more...
If you were the type to think of 2.5" drive technology only in terms of notebook products, then recently, Western Digital probably helped expand your horizons a bit.  With the release of their VelociRaptor 300GB SATA hard drive, mainstream users were exposed to the advantages of the high transfer rates associated with 2.5" platters rotating at 10K RPM, with four access heads pulling data.  Though packed in a 3.5" form-factor for desktop system compatibility, the 2.5", dual 150GB platter platform that the VelociRaptor was built on allows it to outperform virtually all standard 3.5" SATA drives on the market today, even WD's 10K RPM Raptor WD1500 series.  However, the VelociRaptor... Read more...
The results of a recently published study of workers' instant messaging (IM) use shows that IM can actually improve workplace productivity. This contradicts a widely held belief that IM in the workplace is a hindrance to productivity. IM is often perceived as an interruption, and as such, "it can significantly hinder productivity by disrupting thought processes and work flows, causing individuals to take longer to complete tasks."Researchers at Ohio State University and the University of California, Irvine conducted a telephone study by randomly surveying individuals employed full-time who use computers in an office environment at least five hours per week. They netted 912 respondents, of which... Read more...
A study detailed in Nature exposes the local nature of humans: we like to hang around our homes. But that's not what caught our interest. It's the way the study was conducted.Researchers used cell phone towers to track individuals' locations whenever they made or received phone calls and text messages over six months. In a second set of records, researchers took another 206 cell phones that had tracking devices in them and got records for their locations every two hours over a week's time period.The study was based on cell phone records from a private company, whose name also was not disclosed.Study co-author Cesar Hidalgo, a physics researcher at Northeastern, said he and his colleagues didn't... Read more...
Results from a study just released by global consulting company, Accenture, find that only about five percent of all consumer electronics product returns are due to actual failures or defects. The rest of the returns can be categorized as "no trouble found" (68 percent) or "buyer's remorse" (27 percent). The study also finds that "the average return rate for [consumer electronics] devices ranges from 11 to 20 percent." This amounts to approximately $13.8 billion being spent by "US consumer electronics manufacturers, communication carriers and electronics retailers" for "assessing, repairing, reboxing, restocking and reselling returned merchandise." This adds up to as much as six percent of manufacturers'... Read more...
As hard as it may be to believe, according to a study by research firm Parks Associates, nearly 20% of the population of the United States is disconnected from the Internet and has never used email. In their annual phone survey of U.S. households, Parks Associates found 20 million households are without Internet access, approximately 18% of the U.S."Nearly one out of three household heads has never used a computer to create a document. These data underscore the significant digital divide between the connected majority and the homes in the unconnected minority that rarely, if ever, use a computer.""Internet connections have slowly increased in U.S. households, but getting the disconnected minority... Read more...
California's hands-free mobile phone law goes into effect on July 1st. Starting on that date, California drivers will no longer be able to use hand-held phones, but will instead either need to use a hands-free device, whether it's a headset or integrated into the car.A study released Monday by the non-partisan Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) estimates that California will have 300 fewer traffic fatalities a year once the law goes into effect. According to Jed Kolko, PPIC research fellow and study author, if such a ban were extended across the U.S., thousands of lives could be saved.In a study released Monday, Jed Kolko, a fellow at the nonpartisan Public Policy Institute of California,... Read more...
You may recall that Chris Avenir, a first-year chemical engineering student at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada, faced expulsion after it came to light that he had created a Facebook-based chemistry study group.  The horror, the horror!Chris Avenir's apparent exhortation to fellow Ryerson University engineering students to "input solutions" to assignment problems on the social networking site raised the ire of a professor.On Tuesday, the 18-year-old was told that while he wouldn't be expelled he would receive a zero on the assignment section of the chemistry course, which was worth 10 percent of his final grade.Despite that, Avenir still passed the course.He still passed the course... Read more...
The Motion Picture Association of America has always claimed great financial, er, ruin based on illegal downloads, and even blamed as much as 44% of its losses on college students.  Now it turns out that number was just a wee overinflated.In a 2005 study it commissioned, the Motion Picture Association of America claimed that 44 percent of the industry's domestic losses came from illegal downloading of movies by college students, who often have access to high-bandwidth networks on campus.The MPAA has used the study to pressure colleges to take tougher steps to prevent illegal file-sharing and to back legislation currently before the House of Representatives that would force them to do so.But... Read more...
This week the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) released a report which investigated DRM used in 16 different products and services. The conclusion was that many DRM technologies fail to comply with basic requirements of Canadian privacy law.The study, published by the University of Ottawa’s Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC), indicated that DRM is being used to collect, use and disclose consumers’ personal information for secondary purposes, without giving the user adequate notice or the opportunity to opt-out of collection. The report investigated DRM systems used in 16 different digital products and services including Apple’s... Read more...
Some assert that the iPhone is not a smartphone, and iSuppli actually agrees with them, categorizing it as a "crossover phone" - one with both smartphone and feature phone attributes.  No matter what category it's in, it's a hot seller.  In a report issued today, iSuppli said the iPhone outpaced all other smartphones in July, its first full month of sales, and matched the sales of the best-selling feature phone. During its first full month of sales, Apple's highly anticipated smart phone grabbed 1.8 percent of the U.S. consumer mobile-handset market, according to iSuppli. The research firm's survey of more than 2 million U.S. consumers indicated sales of 220,000 iPhones in July. In its... Read more...
Something called the Online Publisher Organization Internet Activity Index is out, and it has some very interesting information in it; just not what they think it is. It measures the proportion of online time spent doing purely communications functions, as compared to viewing online content. According to the study, in the last four years it's shifted massively from the "talking to one another" side to the "looking at stuff" side. Anybody that's seen YouTube could have told you that.  The time consumers spent viewing online content, including video-sharing sites, news sites, video, social nets, weather and blogs, as a proportion of their total time online grew over the past four years... Read more...
A new study shows the effects of gaming on reading and study time amongst students 10-19 years old.  Not surprisingly these students shaved a little time off their studying and reading time to get in a few extra minutes with their favorite games.  Surprisingly they didn't often sacrifice much time with their families. for gamesHow much time to reading/study time are they missing out on?  Well boy gamers in the survey are said to have spent 30% less time reading while the girls who played games (They DO exist!) spent 34% less time doing their homework. “Cummings and Elizabeth Vandewater at the University of Texas at Austin wanted to see how these games affect academic pursuits and social relationships.They... Read more...
A study conducted by Hope Cummings of the University of Michigan and Elizabeth Vandewater of the University of Texas at Austin sampled a group of adolescents, both gamers and non-gamers, from around the U.S. to find out where they find the time to play games and what parts of their lives suffer as a result. They found that boys spent an average of 58 minutes playing games on weekdays and one hour and 37 minutes playing on weekend days. They also found that girls spent 44 minutes playing on a weekday and an hour and four minutes playing on weekend days. To make time for all this gaming, the study found that male gamers spent less time reading while female gamers spent less time doing... Read more...
Study Commissioned by AMD Reveals Scope of Annual U.S. Data Center Energy Consumption: 45 Billion kWh, at Cost of Nearly 3 Billion Dollars - AMD Calls for Increased Collaboration between Technology Industry and Government Officials to Track and Reduce Energy Consumption - NEW YORK - Feb. 15, 2007 - In a keynote address at the LinuxWorld OpenSolutions Summit in New York today, Randy Allen, corporate vice president, Server and Workstation Division, AMD (NYSE: AMD), revealed findings from a study that comprehensively calculated, for the first time, the energy consumed by national and global data centers annually. Addressing the need for thorough, credible estimates on data center power use, the... Read more...
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