Items tagged with Research

What is it that keeps you up at night? According to a recent study from Internet security firm Arbor Networks, more Americans have been staying up late to surf the Internet this summer. Compared to previous years when most Internet activity was in the daytime, the study found that the peak usage time for the whole day has recently been at 11 p.m. Eastern time.The study also found that people using the Internet at work and school produce a smaller peak in traffic around 4 p.m. Eastern time on weekdays. Internet activity then declines as people head home. Traffic levels begin to pick up again at 8 p.m. Eastern and stay surprisingly strong past midnight. According to Arbor Networks, overall traffic... Read more...
Scientists at Stanford are working on an open source camera that could change the world of photography by giving programmers the power to change and add features to a camera via software updates. If the technology catches on, our cameras will no longer be limited by the software that comes pre-installed from the manufacturer.Nearly all of the features of the “Frankencamera,” including focus, exposure, shutter speed, and flash, are able to be controlled by software. According to Marc Levoy, professor of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering at Stanford, “The premise of the project is to build a camera that is open source.” Graduate student Andrew Adams imagines a future where users could... Read more...
Finally, some confirmation that we actually aren't crazy. Well, too crazy. We always wondered where exactly the crowds were that were responsible for buying up all of these Bluetooth headsets, and while we'd see one or two self-talkers walking around the mall every so often, we never saw these things as being incredibly popular. Now, a new research study into the matter finds that owners of Bluetooth headsets in the US are using them less often than they used to. Way less frequently, actually. The numbers show that just 26% of BT headset owners use their devices every day, which is down from 43% in 2009. Interestingly, daily usage increased somewhat in Europe to 36%, but overall daily usage was... Read more...
Own a personal navigation device? Use the GPS on your phone? If you're reading this now, the answer is probably "yes." If you're an avid navigation user, you probably understand the benefits quite well. Rather than having to write down directions to facilities, you simply find the address, plug it in and follow the kind lady on the other end. But have you ever wondered just how much time you save each year by following the GPS? According to a new research study from NAVTEQ, the company responsible for the maps found on a whole slew of GPS devices, the average user can save around four days per year by using a navigation unit. Four days! The study focused on time savings based on the impact that... Read more...
News flash: Blu-ray adoption on PCs is still awfully sluggish. And we're talking about years after the format was introduced, and over a year since it trampled HD DVD to become the lone supported next-gen high-def video format. Why? The answer is pretty simple, really. Cost and necessity. A new research report from iSuppli digs into the reasoning behind the sad truth: Blu-ray just isn't moving the meter on PCs. While the sales of standalone Blu-ray Disc players and PS3 consoles have risen, just 3.6% of PCs shipped in 2009 have BD support. Just think about that. Not even four out of every 100 computers shipped this year have a Blu-ray player/writer in it. That's pretty astonishing if you ask us,... Read more...
With all the talk of music piracy clouding the airwaves these days, it's rather refreshing to hear some positive news about music in the digital age. And despite what the RIAA or anyone else may have you believe, music sales are still happening. Just not in the same way that they were when your mother was buying records. According to a new report, compact discs only accounted for 65% of US music sales in the first half of 2009, while digital downloads are expected to "nearly equal CD sales" by the close of 2010. What's remarkable about this is how quickly the shift in culture has taken place. Generally speaking, it takes quite some time for individuals to stop buying a mainstay and start buying... Read more...
Push aside your political feelings on stem-cell research; any halfway respectable PC enthusiast will definitely be giving IBM the thumbs-up here. The wacky minds over at IBM, which have already proven that they never, ever stop ticking, have apparently determined that the next great generation of microprocessors will have quite a lot in common with human DNA. And so long as those chips push Quake IV along with ease, we can't help but be okay with that.Artificial DNA nanostructures, which are called DNA origami within the lairs at IBM, could one day provide an inexpensive infrastructure which tiny microchips could be built upon. The design is based on research within the company, which is being... Read more...
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Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University said on Monday that they have developed a method for predicting many if not all of a person's Social Security Number based on publicly available data. The findings were released in an article published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Here's what the researchers said in the preface to the report: Information about an individual’s place and date of birth can be exploited to predict his or her Social Security number (SSN). Using only publicly available information, we observed a correlation between individuals’ SSNs and their birth data and found that for younger cohorts the correlation allows statistical inference of private SSNs.... Read more...
Ever since this so-called "recession" thingy got the media all hot and bothered a few months back, we'd been hearing that more and more individuals were finding ways to stay entertained at home. Now, we finally know what they've been doing at the domicile: gaming.A new research report published this week by the Nielsen Company shows a sharp uptick in hours spent in front of a game console since the economy as a whole took a turn for the worse. Said stat has been on the rise since 2007, but here lately is has especially shot up. Of course, this totally makes sense--with more people curbing their spending on "going out," it makes sense that dusty consoles are seeing more usage.The other finding... Read more...
Man, Intel sure hasn't been shy about breaking out the checkbook of late. Just a few months after it allocated $7 billion for investments in chip plants, the company has decided to set aside another $12 million in order to create a Visual Computing Research Center in Europe. What for, you ask? To "explore advanced graphics and visual computing technologies."The facility opens up today at Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany, and we're told that the five year investment represents the company's largest European university collaboration. Intel goes on to explain that visual computing is the analysis, enhancement and display of visual information to create life-like, real-time experiences... Read more...
For the thousands of Microsoft employees that were just handed pink slips this week, we're certain they're none too pleased to hear that their now-former employer is already thinking of spending cash. Of course, Intel has also pulled a similar trick lately, scaling back in some areas while devoting around $7 billion in R&D to other aspects of the business.According to a new report from Reuters, Microsoft is putting an increasing focus on its research efforts in areas well beyond its traditional desktop and office software domain. Such a proclamation isn't all that surprising -- after all, the company is already neck deep in the media player arena (Zune) and gaming arena (Xbox 360). Initial... Read more...
Intel held an event on the west side of New York City this week, where the company showed off some of the interesting projects being worked on in a few of the Intel Lablets that are scatted throughout the United States, at various company and university campuses. We were in attendance at the event and snapped off a number of photos to give you all a glimpse as to what was going on.The event was not about showcasing a single product or family of products, but rather a number of interesting concepts that are being developed by Intel's, or Intel affiliated, research engineers.       One of the coolest demos on display was of wireless power technology. Using a pair of inductors, and... Read more...
It's a well known fact that puzzle games and other brain training exercises actually enhance mental stimulation, but what about titles such as Crysis and Gears of War? Microsoft, of all companies, is looking to find a definitive answer to that by sinking $1.5 million into a research initiative that will, at its core, explore the educational link to video games. Many gamers have confessed that even first person shooters have sharpened their reaction time and taught them to think in more quantitative ways, and while it's obviously possible to go overboard and allow games to become a distraction, Microsoft thinks there could be a balance where it's actually beneficial. According to John Nordlinger,... Read more...
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