Items tagged with Research

Considering the explosion of layoffs announced in recent weeks, companies would do well to seriously be on guard against data theft. According to a survey that polled some 800 companies in eight countries, 42 percent of firms admitted that laid-off employees were the single largest threat to their data security.The survey, which was unsurprisingly conducted by security / technology firm McAfee, found that businesses overall risk losing over one trillion dollars from "loss or theft of data and other cybercrime." After a so-called "rapid acceleration of malicious software" -- better known by laypersons at malware -- occurred in 2008, McAfee set out to really find what all was at stake. By the numbers,... Read more...
The next time you are taking money out at the ATM, be wary of anyone lurking nearby with an antenna sticking out of their pants. They might be stealing your PIN wirelessly. A pair of Ph.D. students at the Security and Cryptography Laboratory (LASEC) of Switzerland's Ecole publique Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), recently demonstrated a number of techniques for listening in on the electromagnetic emanations coming from wired keyboards and interpreting that information into the actual keystrokes pressed. The two researchers, Martin Vuagnoux and Sylvain Pasini, tested four different versions of this technique on 11 different wired keyboards with PS/2 and USB connections, as well as with... Read more...
First: there's no real evidence this is a "kill switch" that Apple will use, but still, based on Apple's protectiveness over the iPhone, it wouldn't surprise us.Jonathan Zdziarski, author of the upcoming book iPhone Forensics, has revealed an URL that he suggests Apple is using to keep a list of any "offending" applications: https://iphone-services.apple.com/clbl/unauthorizedApps.Apple apparently can disable App Store software remotely on your iPhone 3G. The iPhone calls home and poof the application is nuked. Needless to say that this has caused a bit of a blog ruckus (Techmeme). MacRumors notes that Apple has come under fire for removing App Store software without notification and the... Read more...
One of the key challenges of digital photography technology has been to try to capture images as well as the human eye does. While optics have made significant improvements in recent years, modest enhancements to the resolution density of the electronic sensors have kept the lofty goal of mimicking human perception as just a pipe dream. But scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University have now made a breakthrough that might take a giant leap toward reproducing human-eye-like sight in an electronic sensor. Their breakthrough comes in the form of liberating the light-sensing array from the traditional planar or flat surface, which tends to introduce "aberrations."... Read more...
Hacker Safe?  We're guessing that applies only to web sites, not securities fraud.One of the researchers behind ScanAlert, the "Hacker Safe" certification company McAfee recently acquired, is facing fraud charges in Indiana.Brett Oliphant, whose title had been vice president of security services before the Napa, California, company was acquired by McAfee in January, is facing 11 counts of securities fraud in transactions that allegedly brought in more than US$1.215 million.Oliphant and his brother Bryan were charged in December. Their trial is set for Nov. 18 at the Elkhart County Superior Court in Indiana.ScanAlert built technology for auditing and then certifying Web sites as "Hacker Safe."... Read more...
Yesterday, news broke regarding Microsoft and Intel launching parallel research centers at UC Berkeley and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to investigate way to accelerate developments in mainstream parallel computing.  And today, we've posted some details and commentary on the subject over at HotHardware.  Here's a snip from the piece... "Even today, writing software able to take advantage of multi-threading is notoriously difficult. In order to help drive the development of the tools and threading-aware applications, Microsoft and Intel are together awarding the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of California at Berkeley $10 million dollars... Read more...
It's no secret that the days of procuring performance exclusively through faster clock speeds are over. The current crop of multi-core server, desktop, and mobile CPU designs are a dead giveaway that processor vendors like Intel are instead looking to increased parallelism as the facilitator of more computing horsepower. The problem, according to David Patterson, professor of computer science at UC Berkeley, becomes one of scheduling and balancing workloads across multiple sets of processing resources, so that you can truly get more performance out of those threaded designs. If an application is only running in one thread, upgrading to a dual- or quad-core chip won't help speed it up. It's a... Read more...
Utilizing a little known fact about RAM, researchers have devised a way to crack disk encryption. The attack takes only a few minutes to conduct and uses the disk encryption key that's stored in the computer's RAM. The attack works because content as well as encryption keys stored in RAM linger in the system, even after the machine is powered off, enabling an attacker to use the key to collect any content still in RAM after reapplying power to the machine. "We've broken disk encryption products in exactly the case when they seem to be most important these days: laptops that contain sensitive corporate data or personal information about business customers," said J. Alex Halderman, one of the researchers,... Read more...
While it might not sound as fun as bashing in an opponents face with a well placed move in Virtua Fighter 5, the Cell CPU at the heart of each and every PS3 can also be put to use helping researchers understand diseases such as various forms of cancer, Alzheimer's & even Parkinson's disease.Due to the highly parallel nature of the research project and the aptitude of the Cell CPU for such tasks, it isn't very hard to figure out just why the project supervisors are giving the PS3 such praise:"The recent inclusion of PS3 as part of the Folding@home program has afforded our research group with computing power that goes far beyond what we initially hoped," said Vijay Pande, Associate Professor... Read more...
Aimbot, aimhack, cheats, or what have you is what we’re talking about today. We’ve probably all been victims of cheating at least once during the many hours we have spent playing games in front of the screen. And we all know that cheating usually spoils the fun for everyone. That might be why Intel has embarked on anti-cheat crusade, so to speak, with its research on a new anti-cheating system that would make cheating much more difficult for cheating cheaters. Known as the Fair Online Gaming System, it is unlike contemporary software-based anti-cheating technologies in that it would be built into a user’s computer and would combine software, hardware, and firmware. “Anti-cheating software can... Read more...
Just about everyone has at least heard some tale of neglect with video games and/or the internet to blame.  It seems that the American Medical Association (AMA), even after declining to call gaming an addiction (at this time), wants to study the subject further: “The call to examine gaming and Internet addiction may spawn from the widely reported, but isolated incidents of health issues – and even death – surrounding massively multiplayer online games, such as the World of Warcraft.Aside from addiction, the AMA may also look at the emotional effects of video games dealing with extreme content. Currently under intense scrutiny is Rockstar Games’ Manhunt 2, which has been temporarily suspended... Read more...
Haptic technology refers to technology that allows a user to communicate by means of the sense of touch via a computer interface. It seems complicated, but such feats as vibrating phones and video-game controllers are a few examples of haptics at work. In fact, the most famous haptic device is the PHANToM, which allows users to feel what they see. Users can identify an object’s form, shape, weight, and texture. The main applications of such devices are in the fields of medicine, education, industrial design, and accessibility; helping the blind. Researchers are looking to use the technology in the industrial field. “Currently, physical prototypes are replaced by virtual or digital prototypes/models... Read more...
What's the slowest component in your PC today?  Think about - your hard drive.  You can spin them at 15K RPM and still they're the slowest device, with access times measured in milliseconds, versus nanoseconds for virtually everthing else in your machine.  Also, what's the most unreliable component in your machine?  You guessed it... But Germany might have an answer. "It involves a relatively long nanowire that has three sections: a stored magnetic zones and domain walls area; a read area with a read/write sensor to read/write magnetised areas; and a termination area where the magnetic zones and walls are stored after reading or writing. A memory chip using this technology... Read more...
Jon Peddie Research Reports First-Quarter PC Graphics Shipments: Nvidia leaps to first place in desktop graphics chips displacing Intel Overall market down 5.5% quarter-to-quarter; laptops soar 24.6% year-to-year TIBURON, CA - May 2, 2007- Jon Peddie Research (JPR), the industry's leading research and consulting firm for graphics and multimedia, today announced estimated graphics shipments and supplier market share for the first calendar quarter of 2007.  Detailed First-Quarter results are available in the Q1 2007 edition of Jon Peddie's First Look,... Read more...
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