Items tagged with Privacy

Google is at the center of another privacy lawsuit, this latest one filed in the UK on behalf of around 4.4 million iPhone owners who may have had their browsing data improperly collected. Should Google lose the legal battle, it could be on the hook for 3.2 billion pounds, or roughly $4.29 billion, the company revealed in a court filing. Google denies the allegation and doesn't believe the issue even belongs in a London court. The crux of the lawsuit is the use of tracking cookies of Apple's Safari browser. It's similar to what led Google to pay the United Stated Federal Trade Commission (FTC)... Read more...
New Spectre flaws have been revealed by the former head of Intel's advanced thread team, Yuriy Bulygin. This is a man who knows what he's doing, so his opinions and findings are not to be treated as fly-by-night like some others. Through his new security agency, Eclypsium (a neat name, it must be said), Bulygin posts of a new application of speculative execution attacks which hinge on Spectre variant 1 (bounds check bypass), although it's believed that the same exploit would work with variant 2 (branch target injection), as well. Ultimately, Bulygin's exploit leverages the bounds check bypass element... Read more...
Facebook has another small crisis on its hands, and users are panicking all over social media. Over the past 24 hours, Android users have been receiving prompts from the Facebook app requesting superuser privileges.  For those that might not be familiar with Android's permissions system, superuser access would basically grant the Facebook app full or "root" access to your phone. And that's not all; the app is requesting superuser access "forever" -- yikes. Needless to say, the scores of users that received the prompt immediately took to their favorite place to vent their frustrations:... Read more...
Sometimes it feels like security and privacy are myths in this day and age of data leaks, hacking, and everything else. The latest example comes from a LocationSmart, a relatively obscure (to the public) location-as-a-service outfit has been leaking real-time location information of cell phone users on all of the major wireless networks in the United States, including AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, and Sprint. LocationSmart offers a free demo in which anyone can see the approximate location of their own mobile phone simply by entering in their name, email address, and phone number into a form on... Read more...
When testifying before Congress, Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg was upfront about the fact that Cambridge Analytica was probably not the only company to abuse the social network's policies and improperly obtain data about its users. An investigation would likely yield more incidents, and that's what we are seeing now. Following the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Facebook has suspended in the neighborhood of 200 apps that had access to a large amount of user data. That's not likely the final number, either. Those 200 app suspensions are the result of just the first stage of Facebook's... Read more...
If you use Facebook Messenger, hate malware, and always click on links you're sent without a second thought, then you're going to want to exercise more caution moving forward. A new strain of malware has been making the rounds since March, and depending on how you view things, the effect of "Nigelthorn" is somewhat smashing! This latest malware is named after the Nigel Thornberry character in the popular The Wild Thornberrys cartoon, and while it might seem like an odd choice, it was done because the malware works by exploiting the 'Nigelify' browser extension that changes pictures into an image... Read more...
Technology companies that collect any sort of data are scrambling to be sure that they are being as careful in the wake of Facebook's Cambridge Analytica privacy problems. The latest tech firm to take a hard look at user privacy is Apple, with reports that it is cracking down on apps that share location data with third-party companies. Apple has begun removing the apps in question from the App Store if it finds that data is being shared and notifying the developers of the app that they have violated two different listing guidelines (sections are 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 of the App Store Review Guidelines).... Read more...
There has been a privacy issue with Android for quite some time that gave apps the ability to access the network activity of your device without asking for permission. These apps are unable to eavesdrop on the content of your network activity, but they can peek at incoming and outgoing connections via TCP/UDP and figure out what server you are connecting to. In practice, this means that apps can do things like detect if you have connected to the server at your bank to conduct online transactions. One concern with the issue is that it could allow social media apps to track network activity without... Read more...
The name Cambridge Analytica has become synonymous with the illicit use of Facebook user data over the last few months. Facebook originally claimed that Cambridge had exploited the data of 50 million users during the last U.S. Presidential election. The social giant came back later and said that Cambridge Analytica had improperly accessed data on 87 million Facebook users. The privacy fiasco resulted in Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg having to testify in front of Congress. Cambridge Analytica CEO Alexander Nix speaking in November 2017 The fallout from the privacy debacle is now forcing Cambridge... Read more...
Following the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Facebook's privacy policies have been put under a microscope, more so than they have always been. Mark Zuckerberg was called to testify before Congress, and users who have grown tired of Facebook's repeated mishaps engaged in a '#deleteFacebook' campaign on social media. In the wake of all this, Facebook has been making changes to its policies, and is also working on a new tool that lets users erase their histories. "Today, we’re announcing plans to build Clear History. This feature will enable you to see the websites and apps that send us information... Read more...
Ads are what drive much of the web experience as we know it—without them, more websites would have to erect paywalls or figure out other ways of generating revenue. Typically that means seeing ads on webpages. However, a similar business model is creeping into Firefox, with Mozilla announcing plans to add sponsored content to new tabs in Firefox 60 in the US later this month. "We believe the Internet can do better. So earlier this year, we started to explore a new model and showed an occasional sponsored story in Pocket’s recommendation section on Firefox New Tab. Starting today, we’re... Read more...
The world is up in arms its seems of late, over the amount of data that social media websites like Facebook track and accumulate on their users. This came to the forefront with the Cambridge Analytica fiasco that Facebook has been in hot water over for months. With so much focus on Facebook, many have begun to wonder what other websites and services millions of internet users visit every day are collecting hordes of data on us. Google, however, with its far-reaching web data harvesting powers may be even more responsible for hoarding information on its users. British web tabloid The Sun has an... Read more...
Researchers with the International Computer Science Institute claim to have discovered thousands of free Android apps on Google Play that track the location of children, serve up targeted ads to kids, and perform other functions that are potentially in violation of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). The researchers published their findings in a study (PDF) titled, "'Won't Somebody Think of the Children'? Examining COPPA Compliance at Scale." "Based on our automated analysis of 5,855 of the most popular free children's apps, we found that a majority are potentially in violation... Read more...
Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg has offered up some choice words of his own after Apple boss Tim Cook sharply criticized the social networking site over its recent privacy flub involving Cambridge Analytica, a political data firm that is reported to have shared information about more than 50 million Facebook users with Donald Trump's presidential campaign in 2016. Cook last week said Apple considers privacy "a human right, a civil liberty," and suggested that Facebook's fumbling of so much user data constitutes a need to issue some "well-crafted regulation." His comments added to a... Read more...
1 2 3 4 5 Next ... Last