Items tagged with (NASDAQ:FB)

If you live in San Francisco, Washington D.C., New York, L.A., Atlanta, Miami, or Boston, you’ve been looking for love in the top six wrong places. Or put another way, you’re least likely to find that special someone in those cities, according to Facebook. The Wall Street Journal asked Facebook to run some data based on available profile information. In October, Facebook measured the number of people who were single at the beginning of the month and those who professed to being in a relationship at the end of the month from 48 U.S. cities, with sortable results. The aforementioned cities had the lowest relationship formation rates, while Colorado Springs, CO; El Paso, TX; Louisville,... Read more...
Wondering why it's still a good idea to run security software on your system even if you practice safe computing habits? One reason is because even legitimate websites get hacked, and depending on the extent of the attack, visiting what you thought was a benign domain could open up a can of worms. It doesn't matter how large the site is either -- just ask Facebook, latest victim of the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA). Hackers representing the SEA tried to take control of the Facebook.com domain by hacking into the social networking site's registrar, MarkMonitor, which has a number of high profile clients and "strong security practices" in place, according to a SecurityWeek report. The hackers were... Read more...
There's a general perception out there that Google's social network is a virtual ghost town, versus Facebook's online playground, which is always bustling with activity. Google's tried to dispel that notion on occasion by revealing user stats, and if you look closely at the latest numbers, you might be surprised at just how busy Google+ is these days. Tina Courtney-Brown at SiteProNews did some digging and discovered that Google+ is now home to over 1 billion registered users, which compares favorably to Facebook's 1.19 billion. It's true that Google+'s stats are somewhat artificially inflated due to Google integrating accounts for its various services. However, Courtney-Brown says over 540 million... Read more...
Facebook is launching an app called “Paper” that appears to be an effort to bring you all the best news features of Facebook without actually being on Facebook. “Paper makes storytelling more beautiful with an immersive design and fullscreen, distraction-free layouts. We’ve also made it easier to craft and share beautiful stories of your own,” reads the blog post announcing Paper. In other words, Paper makes it easier and more enjoyable to catch up on news from your friends as well as the news from various outlets. In addition to your NewsFeed, which is the default section, you can browse a variety of other sections that pertain to topics you’re interested... Read more...
It's been said that it takes money to make money, though that's not the only thing piles of green paper are good for. Toss enough dollars at the U.S. government and you can enact change, among other things, because let's face it, money talks. If it didn't, the top technology firms wouldn't have spent a combined $61.15 million on government lobbying last year. That figure comes from Consumer Watchdog, a nonpartisan and nonprofit public interest group. According to Consumer Watchdog, the money spent by tech firms on trying to influence federal regulators and lawmakers in 2013 increased 15.9 percent over 2012. "Policy making in Washington is about how much money you can throw around," said John... Read more...
A lot can change in three years. In 2011, Google launched its own social network, Ultrabooks became a thing, Steve Ballmer was the head of Microsoft for the foreseeable future, and it looked like we'd all own a glasses-free 3D TV someday soon. That's really just a sampling of how the landscape has changed in three short years, but it begs the question, what major events are in store for 2017? Try the death of Facebook. A couple of graduate students at Princeton University published a paper claiming Facebook will lose around 80 percent of its active membership by 2017, which would virtually destroy the service. They've come to that conclusion based on treating Facebook like a disease. "We use... Read more...
In the coming months, you'll stop receiving ads in your feed based on what your family and friends are into. They're called Sponsored Stories and the way they work is by showing up sporadically on your news feed based on the activity of your Facebook friends. So, if your mom Liked a Sponsored sewing page, there's a good chance it will show up in your feed even though you couldn't care less about sewing. Advertisers have until April 9 to purchase a Sponsored Story. After that date, Sponsored Stories will transition to other ad formats, such as a Page Like ad, and advertisers will no longer be able to purchase Sponsored Stories, Facebook announced on its developers page. Image Source: Flickr (SESConferenceSeries)... Read more...
Facebook is facing a lawsuit from two users who allege that the company's "private" messaging is anything of the sort. We've seen a number of these cases over the years, going all the way back to Google's ad-crawling for Gmail, and it's generally known that if you use a service, company's are going to attempt to monetize your input. In Facebook's case, that includes all the things you post, the things you don't post, and apparently, even your private messages. Over the past few years, Facebook has been caught handing over user information to advertisers (including names and user IDs, despite promises to anonymize the information). According to the complaint, however, FB has been caught "clicking"... Read more...
Hackers claiming to represent the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA) decided to deface Skype's social media pages with disparaging messages about Microsoft and its digital properties. On Skype's Twitter page, for example, the hackers posted a status update telling followers not to use Microsoft's email services (Hotmail and Outlook) because "they are monitoring your accounts and selling the data to the governments." Skype eventually regained control of its Twitter account, but not before the restless bunch of hackers posted Steve Ballmer's contact information. It was followed by a message that read, "You can thank Microsoft for monitoring your accounts/emails using this details. #SEA." The SEA, if... Read more...
Social networking has become one of the hottest online activities with 73 percent of adults using a social networking site of some kind, according to data compiled by Pew Internet. Around 4 out of 10 online adults get their social groove going with multiple sites, but which are the most popular? Facebook is the obvious big man on campus, but you might be surprised at where the other sites stand. Like Facebook users, Instagram users are likely to check in on a daily basis. However, Instagram is the least popular social networking (by a hair) out of Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and Facebook. Source: Pew Research Center Mark Zuckerberg's online playground dominates all others with 71 percent of... Read more...
We won't make fun of you if you decide to don a tinfoil hat, not anymore. A few years ago you might have looked pretty silly wearing one and been the butt of jokes, but these days privacy is no laughing matter, even if companies and our own government treat it like a joke. There's the whole NSA/PRISM thing, but did you know that Facebook can see statuses and comments you type even when you don't publish them? It's true and Facebook even confirmed it's able to track unpublished posts after a pair of researchers disclosed they had tracked the activity of around 5 million random Facebook users, the Los Angeles Times reports. The study focused on how often users would censor themselves while typing... Read more...
Facebook is wading into treacherous waters. The social media giant started testing out an autoplay video feature earlier this year that would silently play videos as you scroll past them in your NewsFeed. That’s one thing is it’s videos from your friends or family, but it’s quite another when those videos are from advertisers. But that’s exactly what Facebook is planning to do. “Marketers will be able to use this new format to tell their stories to a large number of people on Facebook in a short amount of time - with high-quality sight, sound and motion,” wrote Facebook in a blog post. “This approach will continue to improve the quality of ads that you... Read more...
Instant messaging in some form or another has been around since the dawn of man and woman (slight exaggeration), though don't tell that to Instagram, which yesterday held a major press event to unveil Instagram Direct, its own take on sending messages to friends. While Instagram was super excited to add a feature that's found on just about every major social app for mobile devices, it was a bit of a letdown to members of the press hoping for something bigger. To be fair, this could end up being a big deal for Instagram. At minimum, it's a much needed feature if it's to compete with services like SnapChat and WhatsApp, though rather than blaze a trail into new territory, Instagram is just now... Read more...
Habitual complainers rejoice, Facebook may soon implement a "sympathize" button so that other users can send their virtual condolences. If you're like me, you probably loathe the idea of encouraging self-pity posts, and while a sympathize button will certainly lead to more of those, there are other scenarios where it makes sense to have such a feature. Posting about the passing of a friend or family member comes immediately to mind, or being laid off from work, breaking up with a significant other, getting injured just before the championship game, and so forth. These are all situations in which a sympathize button would be more appropriate than mashing "Like." According to The Huffington Post,... Read more...
Here's a bit of news that's far from deserving of a "Giddyup!": Thanks to the work of a botnet called "Pony", hackers have gained access to credentials for over 2 million individual accounts. These accounts span the entire gamut: Facebook, Twitter, Google (Gmail), and even a payroll service provider - perhaps the most dangerous of them all. Pony works as a keylogger, capturing login details as users type them in. In this particular instance, the transactions end up going through a central server in the Netherlands, one that security analysis firm Trustwave has been tracking. After discovering all of the accounts that Pony had been exploiting, the firm notified the biggest companies in question,... Read more...
The concept of Facebook is pretty great. At its best, Facebook is a fantastic tool for staying in touch with friends and family scattered all over the world, as well as reacquainting yourself with high school buddies and college cohorts. This is the beauty of Facebook as its most basic, and as you peel away layers, you find there's much more to the social network, such as organizing events, staging protests, and more. At this point, you're probably shaking thinking, "I WISH Facebook was like that!" Somewhere along the line, our feeds get cluttered with crappy posts like Candy Crush invites, those annoying (and unfunny) Bitstrips, and incessant rants from that one friend or family member that... Read more...
Starting today, Windows Phone users can finally join in the fun that is Instagram, which at its core allows you to add filter effects and "transform everyday moments into works of art," or something like that. That's the good news. The bad news is that in an attempt to rush Instagram to the Windows Phone platform, certain features have been left off, at least for the time being. "We wanted to make Instagram available to people with Windows Phones as quickly as possible, so we focused on creating an awesome experience with Instagram’s core features. We’re not finished, and our team will continue developing the Windows Phone app to keep releasing features and bringing you the best Instagram... Read more...
When the NSA forced several major tech companies including Facebook, Google, and Yahoo to cough up data on their users, one got the sense that it was a situation of an unstoppable force meeting an immovable object. The first round of that battle went to the NSA because it had (some shadily-acquired) court documents that forced compliance, but these are companies with leaders that are not accustomed to being told what to do. (If anyone is going to spy on Facebook users, by god it’s going to be Facebook itself.) Further, the companies are concerned that the NSA is also hacking their network transmissions, including tapping fiber optic cables and breaking encryption. Unsurprisingly, the companies... Read more...
Snapchat's founders evidently have some big things planned for their startup, and it doesn't involve selling to Facebook for $1 billion. It takes some mighty big you-know-what to scoff at that kind of cash, especially when you're in your early twenties as co-founders Evan Spiegal (23 years old) and Bobby Murphy (25 years old), but these guys believe in their product. So much, in fact, that they reportedly turned down another offer from Facebook, one that's said to have been around $3 billion. Take a moment to clean the coffee off your monitor, we'll wait. Got it all wiped up? Okay, let's continue. According to The Wall Street Journal and people it spoke with that have been briefed on the matter,... Read more...
As I sit here writing this, I'm thinking, "Should I depressed that it's a newsworthy topic when Facebook changes its 'Like' button, or just accept that it's a sign of the times we live in?" I'm not sure of the answer, but as silly as it sounds, in this case, a revamped icon is kind of a big deal, and for a number of reasons. The first, of course, is that Facebook is home to more than 1.15 billion active monthly users, making it the most popular social network in the universe. All those members add up to one very large asset for Facebook, which rakes in tons of cash by advertising to all those eyeballs, plus the cut it gets from in-app purchases of casual games that flood the network. Without... Read more...
By the end of the week, there's a good chance Twitter will be a publicly traded company on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). Twitter's bigwigs are targeting Thursday, and barring any surprises, it will go down as the biggest tech IPO since Facebook, making several people very wealthy over night. However, it's what happens to Twitter after going public that's of interest here. Twitter recently overtook Facebook as the most popular social network among teens in terms of which one has a bigger influence on buying habits and trends. That's not to say Facebook is losing users -- it's not -- but teens are definitely adding alternative services to their growing social portfolios, starting with Twitter,... Read more...
The most surefire way to make teenagers disinterested in something is for their parents to adopt it, and it appears that Facebook is having just such a problem. Facebook has finally admitted that there has been a dip in teen usage--although the company hasn’t provided any numbers. This is a sharp turnaround from Facebook’s position on the matter in Q2, when CFO David Ebersman used the term “urban legend” to describe the assertions that teens aren’t as into Facebook as they used to be. Of course, for as fickle as kids can be and how quickly their interests shift, it’s entirely possible that a fiscal quarter ago there wasn’t a teen problem. Instead, it... Read more...
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