Radeon 9700 Pro Battle Tyan vs Gigabyte

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Radeon 9700 Pro Battle Tyan vs Gigabyte - Page 6

The Gigabyte Maya II R9700 Pro
Vs.
The Tyan Tachyon G9700 Pro
Two Full Featured Radeon 9700 Pros Go Head to Head...

By - Marco Chiappetta
January 5, 2003

   

Overclocking The Gigabyte & Tyan Radeon 9700s
As If They Weren't Fast Enough!

Of course, we can never leave well enough alone, so we set out to find just how high we could overclock the Maya II and Tachyon G9700.  We used the latest version of Powerstrip to raise the core and memory clock speeds until our test system could no longer reliably complete any benchmarks.  We wanted to clearly demonstrate the performance differences we saw when the cards were overclocked, so we re-ran the 3DMark2001 and Quake 3 benchmarks, with 6XAA enabled...

Our overclocking experience with both of these cards was pretty good.  By default, the Tachyon G9700 Pro and Maya II ship with 325MHz and 310MHz (620MHz DDR) core and memory clock speeds.  We were able to take the Gigabyte Maya II R9700 Pro all the way up to a 387MHz core clock, with a 348MHz (696MHz DDR) memory clock, and the system remained completely stable.  The Tyan Tachyon G9700 Pro had a bit more headroom.  With the Tachyon, we hit a 394MHz core speed, with a 352MHz (704MHz DDR) memory clock.  We could have gone even higher with both cards, but the visual anomalies were just too prevalent for us to call the cards "stable".  Overclocking yielded about a 15% increase in performance on Maya II, and an approximate 17% increase with the Tachyon G9700 Pro.

We spent quite a bit of time with both the Gigabyte Maya II R9700 Pro and the Tyan Tachyon G9700 Pro, and only one thing is abundantly clear.  The Radeon 9700 Pro is a killer product, and should be on every gamer's wish list.  But which one would we choose?  Well, picking a "winner" between these two cards was an extremely tough choice, but in the end, we'd have to give the nod the Tyan Tachyon G9700 Pro

GIGABYTE MAYA II R9700 PRO:

The Gigabyte Maya II R9700 Pro had by far the better bundle, and is less expensive than the Tachyon, coming in at $343 US.  The Maya II performed very well throughout our entire benchmarking suite and it was a good overclocker.  The cooling solution wasn't terribly loud and seemed to do its job well, but we would have liked to have seen heat sinks mounted on all of the BGA memory chips, not just the ones situated on the front of the card.  Overall, we have absolutely no problem recommending the Gigabyte Maya II R9700 Pro to anyone looking for a high-end gaming card.  In fact, if price is your most important consideration, the Maya II is the clear choice and you'd end up with four full games added your collection.  Based on its relatively "low" price, excellent bundle, stability and performance we're giving the Gigabyte Maya II R9700 a HotHardware Heat Meter rating of 8.5..

TYAN TACHYON G9700 PRO:

After inspecting, and benchmarking the Tyan Tachyon G9700 Pro, we were very impressed and are happy that Tyan, long known for their quality motherboards, has entered the graphics card market.  Although it is more expensive than the Maya II, $377 US on Pricewatch.Com as of today, the increased cost is justified.  Currently, the Tachyon G9700 Pro, is the only RADEON 9700 Pro we have seen with hardware monitoring capabilities.  It also has one of the most impressive cooling solutions on the market, reminiscent of what Leadtek has done with some of their recent high-end cards.  At default clock speeds, it squeaked by the Maya II in the majority of our tests and it was also the better overclocker.  Until someone comes along to change our mind, the Tyan Tachyon G9700 Pro is "THE" Radeon 9700 to own.  Based in its feature set, performance, cooling solution and "overclockability", we're giving the Tyan Tachyon G9700 Pro a 9 on the HotHardware Heat Meter and the coveted Editor's Choice award...

 Come get some in the HotHardware PC Hardware Forum, now!

Tags:  Radeon, Gigabyte, ATT, pro

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