AMD Radeon R9 Fury Review: Fiji On Air Tested

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Radeon R9 Fury Summary And Wrap Up

Performance Summary: With the exception of higher operating temps as a result of its air cooling, the Fury is superior to the Fury X in many ways  when you consider price versus performance. This is the card that takes the fight to NVIDIA, delivering results that are on average only 4% to 7% behind Team Green's GeForce GTX 980 Ti, but for $100 less. And for $50 more than the GeForce GTX 980, the Sapphire Tri-X Fury we tested consistently defeats that card by a decisive margin. Add to this Fiji's improved power efficiency over Hawaii, recent Windows 10 WQHL driver support, relatively low operating temps, and reasonable overclocking headroom and you have a compelling choice on the table from AMD and Sapphire. 

While the Radeon Fury X was a gorgeously designed and cool-running piece of hardware that introduced some much-needed new technologies into the fold, it fell a bit short with performance expectations. The air-cooled Radeon Fury, however, once again shows AMD returning to form. What form is that exactly? Delivering bang-for-buck kings like the Radeon 7950 and Radeon 290. 
With the exception of higher operating temps necessitated by air cooling, the Fury is superior to the Fury X in every way when you consider the price versus performance. This is the card that takes the fight to NVIDIA, delivering performance that is in most situations only about 4% to 7% behind NVIDIA’s GTX 980 Ti, and for $50 more than the GTX 980 consistently defeats that card by a decisive margin. 
As always, there’s the entire ecosystem to consider when choosing between AMD and NVIDIA, but in terms of bang-for-your-buck performance, the Fury is an absolute winner. It’s a release that adds some genuine excitement to AMD’s product stack, is an important addition to the competitive landscape, and is a tantalizing precursor to what we might expect from the upcoming Radeon Nano.
fury pair
AMD Radeon R9 Fury Cards From Sapphire and Asus - Find Them At Amazon

While the Radeon R9 Fury X was an elegantly designed and cool-running piece of hardware that introduced some much needed new technologies into the fold, it fell a bit short with performance expectations, especially for such a high end card strapped with a water-cooled setup. The air-cooled Radeon R9 Fury, however, once again shows AMD returning to form. What form is that exactly? Delivering solid bang-for-buck, like they did with cards like the Radeon 7950 and Radeon R9 290. The Sapphire Tri-X Fury we tested offers solid value in the high-end video card segment.

As always, there’s the entire ecosystem to consider when choosing between AMD and NVIDIA, but in terms of bang-for-your-buck performance, the Fury is a champion and the offering we tested is only bolstered by Sapphire's cooling design. It’s a release that adds some genuine excitement to AMD’s product stack in our opinion, is an important addition to the competitive landscape, and is a tantalizing precursor to what we might see from the upcoming Radeon R9 Nano. 

Due to an unusually short review lead time, we weren't able to dive into each aspect of the Fury as extensively as usual, but it left a very good first impression and we're looking forward to additional testing in the near future.



  • Great performance
  • Competitive pricing
  • Bang-for-buck
  • Improved power efficiency over Radeon 300 series
  • Only 2 board partner releases 
  • HBM Memory not overclockable yet

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