PC Components, Peripherals And Gadget Reviews And News

Dig into our deep-dive product reviews and news of PC components from processors, to motherboards, graphics cards (GPUs), sound cards, and storage, along with other gadgets and peripherals that complete the computing experience. Whether you're a DIY PC enthusiast builder or just looking to read-up on what should be inside or connected to your next pre-built PC, here's where you'll find all the nuts and bolts sorted on what makes modern computer systems tick, as well some of the best user interface devices to go with them.

Netgear has released a new line of high-end-yet-consumer-friendly Network Attached Servers (NAS) dubbed the RN210 family. They are available in both two-and-four bay models, and this time around we’ll be examining its two-bay model, the RN212. Keep in mind, however, that almost everything we cover here applies to the four-bay model as well, which goes by the moniker RN214. The big deal with this NAS is that, according to Netgear, it’s the “only ARM-based NAS that delivers full HD 1080p to 480p transcoding,” with the purpose being the ability to stream content from the NAS to your smart phone or tablet without any dropped frames. Another notable is that it uses the BTRFS file system, which... Read more...
NVIDIA’s power-efficient Maxwell GPU architecture is a perfect fit for the notebook market, as evidenced by the slew of strong products up and down the company’s mobile GPU line-up. But today NVIDIA is taking things is a slightly different direction at the ultra-high-end, and introducing a “new” mobile GPU, that’s not really a mobile part—the GeForce GTX 980. Notice, there’s no “M” on the end of that model number. NVIDIA is betting that the enthusiasts which are most likely to buy a notebook with a GeForce GTX 980 in it are savvy enough to understand the difference. Through some careful binning and optimizations of the components that accompany the GPU, including the memory, voltage regulation... Read more...
NVIDIA is launching a new mainstream graphics card today, the GeForce GTX 950, based on the company’s GM206 GPU. If you remember, the GM206 debuted on the GeForce GTX 960, which launched a few months back. As the new card’s name suggests though, the GM206 used on the GeForce GTX 950 isn’t quite as powerful as the one used on the GTX 960.We’ll have more details on the GPU itself below (hint: it’s got a couple of SMs disabled) and will show off and benchmark a couple of retail-ready cards from EVGA and ASUS on the pages ahead. Before we move on though, we should talk about NVIDIA’s positioning of the GTX 950. The company is targeting this card at MOBA (massive online battle arena) players, who... Read more...
To compliment today’s launch of the GeForce GTX 950, Nvidia is also announcing that they’ve taught their GeForce Experience software a few new tricks. Two and a half years ago when Nvidia debuted GeForce Experience, it carried a simple tagline: “Console Simplicity, PC Performance.” In its infancy, it merely analyzed your unique hardware and recommend ideal settings for a popular selection of games, targeting a perfect balance between performance and visual fidelity without the user needing to experiment with dozens of graphics tweaks.  Since then, GeForce Experience has seen healthy growth with an install base of 65 million people. Along the way they’ve introduced some genuinely useful features... Read more...
When NVIDIA launched the GeForce GTX Titan X a few weeks back, it did a couple of things. In addition to releasing the fastest single-GPU-powered graphics card we have seen to date, it also created a huge gap in NVIDIA’s desktop GPU line-up. The GeForce GTX 980 can be had for about $530 give or take a few bucks (though that will be changing after today). The GeForce GTX Titan X, however, landed at a cool $1000. That’s a big price gap to leave empty. Consider the Titan X’s massive 12GB of memory and the fact that its GPU leverages all available resources of the GM200 design, and it becomes obvious that a card with less memory and fewer CUDA cores could easily drop in between the GTX 980 and Titan... Read more...
NVIDIA's Maxwell architecture has already torn up the gaming world, thanks to cards like the GeForce GTX Titan X and the GeForce GTX 980. NVIDIA recently took time to bring that same Maxwell goodness over the workstation market as well and the result is the new Quadro M6000, NVIDIA's new highest-end workstation platform. Like the Titan X, the M6000 is based on the full-fat version of the Maxwell GPU, the G200. Also, like the GeForce GTX Titan X, the Quadro M6000 has 12GB of GDDR5, 3072 GPU cores, 192 texture units (TMUs), and 96 render outputs (ROPs). At first glance, the M6000 may seem like a fairly small upgrade compared to NVIDIA's previous top-end GPU, the K6000. Both the older GPU and the... Read more...
NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang kicked off the company's 2015 GPU Technology Conference today with his keynote that focused heavily on "deep learning" and analytics that essentially teach computers to think, recognize and react like a human (AI). Huang disclosed a number of details regarding the just-launched GeForce GTX Titan X as well, along with some news regarding the company’s upcoming Pascal GPU architecture and future-looking initiatives in autonomous driving, accompanied by a special guest, Tesla CEO, Elon Musk. In case you missed out on our full review, we have all of the GeForce GTX Titan X’s juicy details chronicled for you all right here. The card is based on NVIDIA’s 8 Billion transistor,... Read more...
A couple of weeks back at GDC, in a bit of a surprise move considering NVIDIA’s CEO Jen Hsun Huang just left the stage at the company’s own GPU Technology Conference (GTC), the GeForce GTX Titan X was unveiled. The unveiling, which took place during one of EPIC’s talks, was somewhat casual and only a couple of details were disclosed. Jen Hsun said that GeForce GTX Titan X cards featured 12GB of memory and a GPU that packed in roughly 8 billion transistors. Besides whatever we could discern from a few quick pictures, no other details were given.Today though, we can give you the full scoop. We’ve have a GeForce GTX Titan X in house for a little while now and have taken it for a spin,... Read more...
During one of EPIC’s “State Of Unreal Engine” briefing session out at the Game Developer’s Conference, Tim Sweeny talked about the need for more powerful GPU technology to bring us closer to true photo-realistic rendering. At that point in his talk, Sweeny asked if there was anyone in the room that could answer that call, and NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang entered the room carrying a box, concealed within a large jacket.NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang Reveals The GeForce GTX Titan XNIVIDA has their own conference—GTC—happening in about a week’s time, which is where the company usually announces next-gen GPU technology, but Jen-Hsun went ahead and announced a new GPU right in the middle of EPIC’s talk. Out... Read more...
To date, NVIDIA has introduced only a couple of Maxwell-based desktop GPUs. Back in September, the company launched the powerful and potent GeForce GTX 980 (and its little brother, the GeForce GTX 970), featuring the GM204. The GM204 is currently NVIDIA’s fastest single-GPU, though a larger “big” Maxwell-based chip akin to the GK110 powering cards like the GeForce GTX Titan, will likely be introduced at some point as well. Looking even further back, we first got a glimpse of Maxwell on the diminutive GeForce GTX 750 Ti. That card was based on the GM107 GPU, a smaller Maxwell variant, that targets low-power and mainstream applications.Today, NVIDIA is going after the sweet spot of the discrete... Read more...
A few months back, we took a look at the GeForce GTX 750 and GTX 750 Ti, which features a GPU based on NVIDIA’s bleeding-edge Maxwell microarchitecture. Although there have been a few exceptions, when one of the big GPU makers releases a next-gen GPU, they typically start at the high-end and then scale the GPU back to flesh out a top-to-bottom line-up of products, at various price points, leveraging the same core chip architecture. That wasn’t the case with NVIDIA's Maxwell, however. With Maxwell, NVIDIA took a somewhat different approach. The GeForce GTX 750 and GTX 750 Ti are low-power graphics cards targeting mainstream PC users; higher-end GPUs in NVIDIA’s product stack... Read more...
While you were busy blinking, a new development was fast tracking its way onto the monitor scene. We're talking about the transition to 4K, otherwise known as Ultra High Definition (UHD). No matter what you want to call it, the technology shift treats your eyeballs to four times as many pixels as the current standard, which is Full HD 1080p. That's a huge increase, not just in the number of pixels, but in the resulting picture quality that comes from having so many more dots crammed into the same space. Usually when there's a major shift in technology, it comes with a standoff between hardware makers and content creators, each of which is waiting on the other to create a category big enough to... Read more...
The mid-range graphics card market has seen a lot of action as of late, with an infusion of new products and the discontinuation of popular previous-gen products. Last week it was AMD’s turn to announce a new card—the $150 Radeon R7 265—and with its arrival also came a price cut on the Radeon R7 260X, which can now be had for as low as $129, though the MSRP has been reduced to $119. Today is NVIDIA’s turn to introduce a new mid-range graphics card. But unlike AMD’s re-brand and soft-launch, NVIDIA is at the ready with a brand-new GPU architecture and cards should be hitting store shelves immediately. The new GeForce GTX 750 Ti and GeForce GTX 750 are the first... Read more...
NVIDIA's Jen-Hsun Huang took the stage at CES 2014 to discuss NVIDIA's overarching gaming technology efforts, starting with a discussion of PC gaming streaming courtesy of NVIDIA's Shield. We've discussed Shield's game streaming capability before -- it's easily one of the stronger selling points for the product. According to the NVIDIA CEO, the game streaming that the company showed at CES was actually being rendered from an NVIDIA GRID server that was currently located in France. The idea here? NVIDIA can render from thousands of miles away, push those frames to your PC or mobile device, and do it in a manner that feels like a local solution. After covering a number of other NVIDIA innovations... Read more...
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