Items tagged with Web

Milestones come and go, but hitting the big ten is always a feat worth applauding. It seems like just yesterday that the first beta of Mozilla's Firefox was rolling out, but today -- millions of users later -- the tenth iteration is available for download. Firefox 10.1 is now ready to be used by Mac, Linux and PC advocates, with a number of user interface tweaks in tow. There are also a slew of new APIs that provide full-screen web app viewing, CSS 3D transition support, a new CSS inspector, and too many changes to list. Well, almost. The entire list can be found here, and the download is there in the Via link below. Anyone upgrading and care to tell us what plug-ins break?... Read more...
Well, there's no doubt that iCloud is the next hot thing for Apple, but MobileMe is where it all started for Apple's cloud initiatives. MobileMe was always a curious service. Why did it cost $99/year? Why did it do so little? Why were there so many problems? Why was it even an Apple service? Steve Jobs has reportedly been growing increasingly frustrated with MobileMe as a whole, even admitting during the WWDC opening keynote that the product wasn't Apple's finest. But if you're an existing user, don't worry, things are vanishing right away. Emails are going around to those who bought into MobileMe saying that the service will remain alive and active until June 30, 2012, after which it will be... Read more...
Guess what? The Internet is growing, by leaps and bounds. Tons of new users are joining the digital revolution each and every day, all across the globe, via mobile or fixed line connections. And now, a new study has found that global online traffic will quadruple by 2015. Yes, quadruple, even from where it's at today! That's massive growth, no question about it, and you have to wonder what changes will be required to keep all of those users happy. The study, put out by Cisco, also sees the amount of gadgets link to the Web climbing to 15 billion by that same year. Those figures were highlighted in the company's fifth annual Visual Networking Index Forecast, which also forecasted that around 3... Read more...
Facebook and Bing are making your searches smarter. As long as your friends are smart, anyway. Microsoft has just announced that Bing is undergoing a rather impressive update, where search will be driven by friends rather than "facts and links" solely. Research has shown the company that 90% of people seek advice from friends and family as part of a decision making process, and why should searching the web be any different? The "Friend Effect" is available to activate right away; starting now, users can receive personalized search results based on the opinions of your friends by simply signing into Facebook. New features make it easier to see what your Facebook friends “like” across... Read more...
Is your mom telling you what you can and can't look at on the Internet? Do you have Web surfing restrictions? Back in the day, these restrictions were seemingly everywhere, and the media made it a priority to inform parents about the kinds of trouble their kids could get into online. Now, that has died down somewhat, and despite age restrictions attached to a number of Websites, a new survey found that more kids are using them than ever before. According to the findings, the amount of U.S. parents who would allow kids ages 10-12 years old to have a MySpace or Facebook account has "doubled" in the span of just a year. 17% of parents in the U.S. that were questioned said that they had no problem... Read more...
Another week, another new monitor, and this time it's coming from Acer. The company's new DX241H isn't just your grandma's monitor, though -- it's a "Web Surf Station." What's that mean? It means that this is the first monitor that'll let you surf the web and enjoy multi-media without the need of a computer. It's a bit like "Instant On" for netbooks, but this is on an LCD. ncluding both wireless and wired connectivity options, the Acer DX241H ensures seamless access to available networks for instant Internet access, and with a 24" panel, it should fit nicely into most workrooms. Without even needing a PC, you can launch an internal web browser to surf away (though don't expect too many advanced... Read more...
Well, what better way to celebrate your one hundred millionth user than to unveil plans of expansion onto new platforms, all but guaranteeing another flood on your way to 200 million? That's the question being posed to Opera today, which just reached the 100 million mark on the mobile side of things. According to the numbers issued today in Opera’s State of the Mobile Web report, 90.4 million people now use Opera Mini every month and approximately 15 million people use Opera Mobile each month. In all, 105 million people use Opera on their phones. Are you surprised? You shouldn't be. A recent IDC report found that in the final quarter of 2010, more smartphones were sold worldwide than PCs,... Read more...
Have you noticed something different about Google recently? Yesterday, Google started rolling out a major overhaul to its familiar homepage. Now, you'll see instant search results that are generated with each key that you type. These results will be shown in addition to the search suggestions that were previously available. The new feature is known as Google Instant. It's based on the idea that people type more slowly than they read. Because you'll be able to scan for results while you type, Google hopes you'll find the right content more quickly than before because you won't have to finish typing a search term or even press search to find the result you want. 126 million results, just .27 seconds...... Read more...
Like it or not, the world wide web is taking over. And when we say "taking over," we really mean it. The web is everywhere these days: on your PC, on your netbook, on your airplane, on your smartphone, on your HDTV, and soon, on your printers. Hewlett-Packard today introduced their first Officejet printers with Web connectivity, alongside their ePrint and Print Apps. If you aren't keeping pace with technology, chances are you'll have difficulty working this generation's printers. Imagine that! These two new printers are the first designed specifically for small business and prosumer use with access to the Internet, and the new feature set is quite impressive. Users can print web content such... Read more...
It's sort of amazing where we have come with mobile Browsing, really. Just think back in the year 2000. When people were ringing in the New Year, no one had a smartphone capable of Browsing the Web in a way that was even close to as comfortable as with a PC. It simply wasn't a reality. Today, smartphones are canned and immediately overlooked if they cannot Browse the Web in a respectable manner, with Apple's iPhone arguably setting the original benchmark. Google's Android also has a remarkable Browser, but now that mobile Web surfing has become so popular, consumers are being shown alternatives to stock Browsers in an attempt to spruce up the market and forge ahead in mobile surfing. It's becoming... Read more...
Oh, brother. Okay, we won't jump to conclusions and be immediately skeptical, but there's just something strange about how quickly the industry is latching onto 3D without any real proof that it'll work in more than just the cinema. Of course, when power house companies like Sony and NVIDIA get behind something, it leaves little choice for everyone else. They either follow suit or get left behind, in most cases. Now, Adobe is expected to introduce full 3D support in their next version of Flash. Yes, 3D Flash. One has to wonder if the Nexus One, which runs Flash fairly well, will ever be able to even support 3D Flash, though obviously you'd need it output to a 3D monitor to fully see the effect.... Read more...
Google has released its Caffeine indexing technology. As the most significant change Google has made to the basic technology that crawls the Internet and ranks Web pages since 2006, Caffeine has been in the testing phase for almost a year. According to Google, "Caffeine provides 50 percent fresher results for web searches than our last index, and it's the largest collection of web content we've offered." In a blog post announcing the completion of Caffeine, Google Software Engineer Carrie Grimes explained how Caffeine is different from the company's previous indexing system: Our old index had several layers, some of which were refreshed at a faster rate than others; the main layer would update... Read more...
Last summer, we took a deep dive into Apple's (then) newest Web browser, Safari 4. One of the major problems we had with it was the lack of Extensions support that makes Firefox such a great alternative. It seemed to be a fine browser overall, but it lacked that "extra" that Firefox had and has. This week, Apple introduced something other than the iPhone 4 when they took the wraps off of Safari 5. It's a pretty monumental release for the browser, with the major new addition being Safari Reader. In keeping with Apple's newfound success in the reading/ebook business, this new feature allows users to "read articles on the Web without distraction," mostly by automatically popping the article out... Read more...
AT&T has it bad. They can't borrow bandwidth from Sprint or Verizon (GSM isn't compatible with CDMA), and they have the biggest bandwidth-sucking smartphone ever on their network, and their network alone. They consistently get panned for not doing enough to keep iPhone owners happen, and yet they're spending billions in infrastructure upgrades. They just can't win. And if they soon lose the iPhone's exclusivity to Verizon, it'll be just another blow. Reports have been published lately detailing AT&T's trouble in getting more equipment shipped over from China. They simply cannot get expansion equipment built fast enough to install and appease the consumers. It has been an ongoing issue,... Read more...
Did Google miss a critical opportunity? Some might say they did. Google has obviously capitalized on quite a number of market openings, paving the way for true smartphone competition with Android, putting Yahoo! and MSN on their toes with Google search, and putting Yahoo! Mail as well as Hotmail on guard with Gmail. And that's just the beginning. Google is also doing their best to bring cloud applications into the mainstream, with the Google Document suite putting serious pressure on Microsoft's Office suite. But no one needs to tell you that Google is on top of their game. Google is even looking to revolutionize the television industry and content delivery business with Google TV.  In fact,... Read more...
Google's own I/O conference in California is wrapping up today, but not before the company goes out with a serious bang. To our knowledge, Google is about the only technology company out there today that is big enough to throw their own party and get people to come, aside from Apple of course. One of the major announcements from today's keynote speech was something that had been rumored for awhile: Google TV. Unlike what we had heard earlier, there's not going to be a special Google TV set-top box, at least not yet. Basically, Google is taking the Apple TV concept, but going way overboard by introducing apps, screen customization and channel searching. Google is really, really good at two main... Read more...
Here's something you probably already knew: Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser has been around awhile, with varying editions carrying on through the years. IE 6, for whatever reason, was a version that saw huge adoption, and with so many non-upgraded Windows XP machines still in use, it's no surprise that a huge majority of Web surfing still goes on via Internet Explorer 6. But IE6 is old. Way old. And even Microsoft knows it. The world, including Microsoft, has moved on, but legions of Web users have not. In an effort to get those laggards to "get with the times," Microsoft has launched a tongue-in-cheek campaign to get people to upgrade from IE6, and they aren't even being coy about it.... Read more...
Oh no! Sound the alarm! Alert the neighbors! The sky is falling! Or is it? We've heard before that the Internet may eventually run out of bandwidth and/or IP addresses, but none of those horror stories ever came to light. But now, another End of the World scenario is presenting itself: the world could soon run out of Internet addresses, despite the fact that ICANN just recently enabled the use of non-Latin domain names. That's according to Rod Beckstrom, chief executive of ICANN, who is worried that the explosion of connected devices could eat up the 8% or 9% of remaining IPV4 addresses, and that if companies didn't switch over to IPV6 soon, we could all be in a big mess when that wall is hit.... Read more...
Simple software launches don't often grace the front page here at Hot Hardware, but Office is the 800lb. gorilla that no one can ignore. Yet. Google is working tirelessly to replace the need for standalone desktop Office products with Google Documents, an online suite of similar products that can be used on any machine connected to the Internet. It's a shift toward cloud-based computing, and Microsoft's obviously not ignoring that bandwagon. This week, the company launched their latest version of Office: Office 2010. Early reviews have found that this shouldn't be high on your upgrade list if you're a simple home user, but for enterprises who need to create files that are more graphically intense... Read more...
Net Neutrality has always been a hot button topic, just like anything else involving politics. What really pushed the discussion over the edge was Comcast's decision to throttle some users in hopes of providing a "better experience" for others; you can probably imagine why this made some people glad and some people upset. But the question always lingered: could Comcast really do that? As the Internet becomes more of an asset and a bigger factor in the global economy, we knew the American government would step in at some point to have their say. And now, the FCC is doing just that. Over the course of this week, the agency has been looking into how to best add some oversight to an Internet that... Read more...
Isn't it ironic? Or maybe that's not even the best term to use here. Isn't it...weird? Wikipedia has quickly become the go-to place for knowledge on the Internet, and while it cannot always be trusted completely, it's usually a great place to start searching for information on pretty much any topic you can think of. It's certainly better than the paper-based encyclopedias of old, which is what makes this whole situation so strange. We've always heard that history repeated itself, but it literally is with this bit of news... Wikipedia is now offering books, as in paper books. There's no mistake or typographical error here.  PediaPress is the official print-on-demand partner of Wikipedia,... Read more...
My, how the mighty have fallen. It wasn't long ago that Internet Explorer simply dominated the Internet. Everyone used it be default, and no other browser came close in terms of market share. IE was so powerful that the European Union banded together and forced Microsoft to insert a Browser Selection Screen on all new copies of Windows 7, and we wouldn't be surprised if other nations followed suit.Since then, a number of worthy competitors have not only hit the market, but gained serious steam. Mozilla's Firefox has become a huge player, and Google's Chrome has grown faster than pretty much any other unconventional Web browser in the history of the space. The newest data from Net Applications... Read more...
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