Items tagged with thin

The Wall Street Journal has the skinny on the resurgence of "thin clients" in the workplace. And no, by "thin clients," they're not talking about being a clerk in an anorexia clinic. A new generation of simplified devices -- most often called "thin clients" or "simple terminals" -- is gaining popularity with an increasing number of companies and other computer users in the U.S., Europe and Asia. The stripped-down machines from Wyse Technology Inc., Neoware Inc., Hewlett-Packard Co. and others let users perform such tasks as word processing or accessing the Internet at their desks just as they did with their personal computers.... Read more...
As we mentioned yesterday, Google is useful for all sorts of things you might not know about. Slate's Michael Agger has a fascinating rundown on one of the strangest and most controversial applications Google's got: searching through patents: Now that the buzz is wearing off, it's time to ask what Google Patents is actually good for. The wizards of Mountain View have stated that their corporate ethos is to organize all of human knowledge. But why is it that Google's search technology often seems like a killer app for ending pointless conversations? With the debut of Google Patents, a question from a cubicle mate along the line of, "Do... Read more...
Well, "Black Friday" has come and gone. But we who live on the cutting edge don't pay attention to such outdated calendar occasions. We go to work on the Monday after Thanksgiving, boot up the web browser, and buy, buy, buy. Nothing evokes the holiday retail season more than shoppers lined up outside of department stores at 4:59 a.m., the day after Thanksgiving, waiting to snap up the hottest deals. The Internet has its own, albeit less visual, start to the holiday season: Cyber Monday. It marks the day folks return to the office after Thanksgiving, replete with access to superfast workplace Internet broadband connections. JupiterResearch forecasts online shoppers will spend $32... Read more...
Well, this kind of make it official. Here's a review of Microsoft's Zune player, and it's featured on a news outlet with Microsoft in its name: msnbc, and they no likey much. Lately I've been playing with the fruits of that insomnia: Zune, due for sale on Tuesday. I should say, Zune Version One of many to come. The division that created Zune is the same one that created the Xbox project, another very long-term assault on a dominant competitor. Like the Xbox, Microsoft sees Zune as a Long March, and is ready to spend five or even 10 years evolving the product so that somewhere in the mid-twenty-teens, it becomes your music device.... Read more...
Hello Everyone.  We're writing to let you all know that we've just posted a new article where we evaluate the features and performance of IBM / Lenovo's Z61p wide-screen mobile workstation. Here's a snip from the article... "In 2005 IBM sold the Thinkpad line to Chinese computer maker, Lenovo making it the 3rd largest computer vendor in the world. Under the agreement with Lenovo, IBM would retain its branding on the Thinkpad line for several years to follow. Shortly after the acquisition, Lenovo began producing new Thinkpads. In the mix was the first widescreen Thinkpad, the Z60, that offered an optional Titanium cover.... Read more...
Back in 1992 IBM introduced its Thinkpad line of laptop computers. Since that time the Thinkpad has become a staple in mobile business computing. Thinkpads have had a history of firsts in the laptop industry with the invention and usage of such innovative features as the Trackpoint, Thinklight, Ultrabay, biometric fingerprint reader, and Magnesium/Titanium composite construction. These types of innovative features have even landed IBM a spot in the New York Museum of Modern Art with the butterfly keyboard from the 1995 Thinkpad 701C. Thinkpad keyboards are synonymous with quality and durability and are widely considered as some of the best in the industry. All of these attributes have helped... Read more...
I know you slept through quantum physics class. Your snoring woke me up. Luckily, Someone at Magiq Technologies, among other people, was sitting up straight and taking notes. And they think they can make the next generation of data encryption essentially impregnable by using those pesky photons from page 234 in the textbook we didn't read either: Magic combines a computer, a finely tuned laser, a photon detector, and a fiber-optic line. The laser inside the Magiq QPN box is adjusted to produce single photons, which are then sent over the fiber-optic cable to a second QPN box, which detects them and notes precisely their time of arrival.... Read more...
Ryan over at PC Perspective has stumbled across a very controversial discovery when testing a Radeon X1950 XTX graphics card for another review. Here, Ryan found that the standard Radeon X1950 XTX was really using 2xAA when the user selects 4xAA in OpenGL games such as Prey, Doom3, and Quake 4! The interesting part here (and possibly incriminating) is that the Crossfire version of the Radeon X1950 XTX operated properly and used 4xAA when it was selected. Could this be a driver bug or possibly be ATI taking advantage of reviewers only testing with popular FSAA modes such as 4xAA? We're not sure, though we are anxious to hear what ATI thinks of this issue.... Read more...
While the article suggests $16 million in losses for unauthorized access and theft for 2006, the actual amount is likely much greater since many violations go unreported. A single violation could easily result in losses of this magnitude when the loss is associated with confidential data from a Fortune 500 company. While some IT managers circumnavigate this problem by simply isolating critical data and prohibit it from being transferred to mobil devices, this is not a practical solution in todays mobile society. I protect sensitive information using EncFS, a Linux encrypted virtual file system. EncFS requires a typed password to decrypt (on the fly) certain folders on my laptop. While effective,... Read more...
Problems, problems, everywhere. We need power to solve these problems. And alternatives to burning the icky black stuff we find under deserts always have one problem: they cost more, and/or they don't store as well. But a company in Texas, EEStor, is working on a replacement for chemical batteries that make it cheaper and faster to supply power to pretty much anything. High capacity capacitors have the potential to replace lead-acid and other exotic batteries and make electricity storage finally triumph over very old dinosaur goo: Forget hybrids and hydrogen-powered vehicles. EEStor, a stealth company in Cedar Park, Texas, is working on... Read more...
What is YouTube, exactly? It serves different purposes for different users, but its main reason for existence recently seems to be for music industry lawyers to fight over any money that might be in it. But Warner Brothers music seems to have come to the realization that YouTube is a massive pile of eyeballs that want to look at their product, and have decided that maybe they'd like to get a little milk from that cow instead of hiring lawyers to try to cut it into steaks: Warner Music has agreed to make its library of music videos available to YouTube, marking the first time that an established record company has agreed to make its content... Read more...
The world's a dangerous place. Lots of bad people want to steal your stuff. They especially want to  steal the money you've got to buy that stuff. Some of the more sophisticated hoodlums know more than the security experts at the bank do about how your sensitive information is handled and stored. All of them know more than me about it. What to do about it? Maybe the ID Vault is the way to go: ID Vault is a USB security token with an embedded smart card chip. To access your financial accounts with ID Vault you need two-factors; you need your ID Vault PIN (something you know), and you need your ID Vault itself (something you have). If a thief steals your ID Vault, they can't... Read more...
AMD's acquisition of ATI has been causing some prominent motherboard manufacturers to rethink their current production strategy. There's a bit of uncertainty floating around over the state of Intel motherboards containing ATI chipsets. As DigiTimes reports, ECS may be having second thoughts about launching their Intel-based boards which contain ATI's RD600 and RS690 IGP chips. On the other end of the spectrum, Gigabyte Technology has plans to produce a motherboard using ATI's RS690 IGP for the AMD platform. To further compete with Intel in the OEM PC Market, AMD may also be planning to bundle their CPUs with ATI chipsets.... Read more...
AMD head honcho, Hector Ruiz reported late last week that sales have begun to soften for the company known as "David" to Intel's "Goliath" legacy. "...The question now is whether this is part of a seasonal slide--the second quarter is traditionally weak for semiconductor companies--or the effect of a nasty price war initiated by chip king Intel after AMD began to eat into its market share. Investors, who earlier in the year flocked to AMD, no longer seem interested in sticking around to find out how the story plays out. " At this point, we think it's too early to say whether or not some of this is related to the speculation that Intel will have significantly stronger... Read more...
If you are in the market for a new Core Duo powered notebook, you'll want to check out this article. We take a look at Sony's slick VAIO VGN-SZ150P/C. This notebook features a 13.3" XBrite screen and a hybrid graphics sub-system that can be powered by a GeForce Go 7400 or an Intel IGP. All in less than 4lbs of mobility.... Read more...
If you're in the market for a powerful new notebook, [H]Consumer -- sister site to [H]ard|OCP -- has just posted a preview of Lenovo's Core Duo powered ThinkPad T60 that you'll want to check out.  Seems like a really nice notebook.  I'm going to be adding it to my list of upgrade options; this X1000 has to go soon. "Carrying an Intel Core Duo processor and the innovative ThinkPad system management platform, the T60 is a look at the future of mobile computing. We give you the [H] Consumer perspective on what you can look forward to."  ... Read more...
Anandtech has posted an absolutely scathing review of ASUS' PhysX discrete physics accelerator. Although the card seems to perform well when testing AGEIA's own demos and tests, actual gameplay benchmarking reveals that the physics "accelerator" actually yields lower framerates. Granted, this is largely due to the use of higher quality physics effects and increased data flow. However, with no way of testing this higher quality physics mode in software we have no idea whether a dual-core CPU would be able to match the PPU's performance (or lack thereof). Rest assured, we'll have that answer in the very near future as we put AGEIA's PPU to the test on the Hot... Read more...
Coming Sooner Than You Think: Intel Next–Generation Enterprise Platforms Architectural Innovation through Powerful and Energy–Efficient Multi–core Platforms NTEL DEVELOPER FORUM, San Francisco, March 7, 2006 – Pat Gelsinger, Intel senior vice president and general manager of the Digital Enterprise Group, today showed how Intel will deliver superior computing performance and energy efficiency this year while reducing the total cost of IT ownership. "2006 marks a year of transitions for Intel –– a transition to a new process technology and a powerful new microarchitecture, along with the delivery of new platforms solving tough problems for our customers," said... Read more...
OK, so we're dropping this week's Old School update from Sully in here and then we're gonna duck.... If the title doesn't get ya, Janet Jackson wardrobe malfunctions and pre-dipped chips ought to! Sully sounds off again, with "The Old School Perspective": Xbox 360, I think NOT  ... Read more...
Hey folks! It's time to kick off the news with new edition of HotHardware. The news format is changing a bit, so keep a look out for more frequent updates. Now, If you're in the market for a new Tablet PC, CoolTechZone has posted their views on the Lenovo ThinkPad X41. Also, for those of you wondering how much CPU power Quake 4 can eat up, FiringSquad has benchmarked the game against high-end to mid-range AMD and Intel CPU's. Those of you who remember similar benchmarks with Doom 3 should have an idea of what to expect. The Athlon XP series is not included in the test, but from the Doom 3 CPU benchmarks I've seen, if your still using an Athlon XP, you should upgrade if you want to get the most... Read more...
It has taken quite sometime for ultra-portables to be fully accepted by the notebook community. This really has more to do with their price tags, than any specific design or aesthetic issue. Considering that ultra-portables are usually more expensive than traditional notebooks, it isn't hard to see why most people would choose the cheaper option. And because ultra-portables have traditionally been low power options, and battery life was lacking, they were usually relegated to the low end. Add that to the fact that any previous practical use of an ultra-portable still required a main system to compliment it, either a desktop machine or a more traditional notebook; an ultra-portable asked a lot... Read more...
Known as arguably one of the best selling Notebooks in the Corporate sector, IBM's T series of Thinkpad Notebooks has historically earned high marks for its build quality, feature set and general well-rounded performance. Today HotHardware's Andrew Ku takes a look at the new IBM/Lenovo Thinkpad T43 Notebook. Can IBM pass the Thinkpad's illustrious torch onto Lenovo and make the transition with this new machine? With a 1.73GHz Dothan core Pentium M, an i915PM chipset, DDR2 DRAM and ATi X300 graphics under it's hood, the T43 is looking like a pretty solid offering.   Step on in and find out for yourselves!... Read more...
Prev 1 2 3 4 5 Next