Items tagged with Oracle

IBM on Tuesday announced that the way it's going to compete with Hewlett-Packard and Oracle in the server space is by offering lower priced and easy-to-configure solutions for small-to-medium size businesses (SMBs). Towards that end, IBM rolled out eight new servers powered by its latest Power 7+ processor, starting with an entry-level model that costs less than $6,000, along with new PureSystems for big data and cloud-storage chores. "Big data and cloud systems that were once only affordable to large enterprises are now available to the masses," said Rod Adkins, Senior Vice President, IBM Systems & Technology Group. "With these new systems, IBM is forging an aggressive expansion of its Power... Read more...
If our not-too-subtle hint a couple of weeks ago about the perils of having Java installed wasn't enough to convince you to uninstall, you should waste no time in heading on over to the official site and grabbing the latest version (7u13). When it comes to Java, the Swiss-cheese of the software world, it's important to snag updates whenever they're rolled-out - but this one is in a league of its own. Oracle managed to pack 50 fixes with this single update - the largest bulk of fixes ever seen in the software's history. For those interested in getting into the nitty gritty of what's been patched up, you can head on over to this very in-depth advisory page. Given the number of holes and exploits... Read more...
When Oracle released its Java Update 11 earlier this week, it patched several zero-day exploits that security researchers had previously identified. Nevertheless, a number of firms still recommended uninstalling Java due to a number of remaining bugs. It's taken less than a week for new flaws to surface -- and these are issues that hadn't previously been identified. Adam Gowdiak, of Security Explorations, noticed that while Update 11 fixed some outstanding issues, it did nothing to repair a flaw in the Java MbeanInstantiator that still allows for the execution of malicious code. Oracle's decision to leave the problem less-than-fixed inspired Adam Gowdiak, of Security Explorations, to go looking... Read more...
Java is a mess; Oracle’s software has become a popular target of cybercriminals, and news about Java exploits is becoming more and more common, even as the solutions Oracle provides offer little comfort. Wait, it gets worse: According to Kaspersky Labs and security company Seculert, the terrifying and massive Red October botnet espionage campaign that swiped sensitive data from governments worldwide used Java exploits to penetrate some systems. Specifically, the exploit in question is CVE-2011-3544, which is present in Java 7 and 6 (update 27) and allows “remote untrusted Java Web Start applications and untrusted Java applets to affect confidentiality, integrity, and availability... Read more...
Consider this a PSA: Oracle is going to patch that hole in Java, the one that security pros discovered last week. Cybercriminals were using a zero-day exploit in Oracle’s Java to deliver malware payloads, steal identities, and take over computers to force them to commit nefarious acts. According to Reuters, Oracle said that “A fix will be available shortly”, which of course begs the question of what “shortly” means, exactly. In an hour? A week? A month? In any case, the exploit apparently only affects Java 7, so users with older versions of the software can breathe a sigh of relief. However, everyone should note well that this is the second major security flaw in... Read more...
Intel's Itanium has spent the past year in an unwelcome spotlight. The war between HP and Oracle over whether or not the latter had an obligation to support HP servers after publicly promising to do so dragged Intel's Itanium roadmap into the limelight. Ultimately, the judge found that Oracle had to live up to its contractual obligations and concluded that the case was brought for personal reasons, but the damage to HP was done. Disclosures that came to light during the trial indicated that HP had paid Intel a sizeable sum of money to continue developing Itanium past the point when Intel would've otherwise canceled the project. There's nothing unusual about paying a company to build a processor,... Read more...
My, how times, have changed. It wasn’t that long ago that Apple reigned supreme on the security front and Windows (and the operating system's associated software) was a vulnerability-laden punchline, but over the years Microsoft has buckled down to fix its security woes. No one is saying that Microsoft is suddenly immune to attacks, but Kaspersky no longer has any Microsoft products on its list of Top 10 vulnerabilities for Q3 2012. In fact, in its “IT Threat Evolution Q3 2012”, Kaspersky lists two Apple products on that list: QuickTime and iTunes, both of which have multiple vulnerabilities. The list is compiled from all of Kaspersky customers’ machine from Q3 2012. There... Read more...
Believe it or not, but Macs are susceptible to security vulnerabilities too, and perhaps erring on the side of caution, Apple has begun removing dated versions of Oracle's Java software from OS X when Mac users upgrade to the latest release. "Java for OS X 2012-006 delivers improved security, reliability, and compatibility by updating Java SE 6 to 1.6.0_37. This update uninstalls the Apple-provided Java applet plug-in from all web browsers," Apple stated on its support website. "To use applets on a web page, click on the region labeled 'Missing plug-in' to go download the latest version of the Java applet plug-in from Oracle." Interestingly, Apple didn't specify exactly what prompted the change,... Read more...
HP has just announced that it will write off $8 billion dollars worth of goodwill due to poor performance of its Enterprise Services sector. In highly related news, the previous head of that segment, Jim Visentin, has quit to "pursue other opportunities." The move is seen as a readjustment in value of the properties HP acquired when it purchased Electronic Data Systems in 2008 for $13.2B. Do the math -- HP apparently thinks it overpaid, or is dubious of its long-term ability to compete with IBM. Visentin has been replaced by Mike Nefkens, with Jean-Jacques Charhon serving as chief operating officer for the embattled business unit. HP's $8B writeoff is an oddly high figure, given the performance... Read more...
The hard drive shortage, Oracle's assault on Itanium, and highly competitive scenarios in its ink-and-printer business combined to kneecap HP's earnings this last quarter. The company's net revenue fell seven percent, to $30 billion, while overall margins dropped to just 6.8 percent -- a decline of 3.7 percentage points. The steep decline in revenue was driven by a number of factors. Personal computing sales were down 15% year-on-year, imaging sales fell 7%, and enterprise server product revenue was down 10%. On the upside, HP's services business, software revenue, and finance division all grew profits over the same period -- but not enough to offset these declines. The company's CEO, Meg Whitman,... Read more...
In the ongoing HP/Oracle lawsuit, the judge has dismissed Oracle's fraud case against HP and decided to allow the unredacted version of Oracle's claim to be published, and it's chock full of juicy bits and choice quotes. None of the newly revealed portions change Oracle's claim that HP and Intel have unnaturally extended Itanium's life, or its accusations that HP engaged in slander, but they do back up some of the company's claims. The Situation According to Oracle According to Oracle, HP has paid Intel $690 million since 2008 to continue building Itanium processors and representing the processor as alive, well, and a crucial part of Intel's roadmap. The problem HP has is that it built an ecosystem... Read more...
The battle between HP and Oracle over the future of the Itanium processor has gotten large enough to pull Intel into the courtroom, but the CPU manufacturer successfully appealed to a judge to allow it to keep certain documents confidential rather than turning them over to Oracle. For those of you just tuning in, the entire spat kicked off when Oracle announced it was cancelling plans to support Intel's Itanium in future versions of its database software. Accusations between the two companies piled on thick and fast, with Oracle alleging that Intel's Itanium roadmap and support is the result of a secret contract with HP designed so that "HP can maintain the appearance that a dead microprocessor... Read more...
HP and Oracle have been slugging it out in court over the future of Intel's Itanium for months now. HP has just widened the front by asking the EU to investigate whether Oracle acted improperly when it terminated support for Intel's Itanium. HP claims that Oracle is improperly leveraging its software market to compel purchases of its own hardware, while Oracle maintains that Itanium is essentially a zombie chip. Just the Facts HP sued Oracle after the software company announced it would stop building software for Itanium. According to Bill Wohl, HP's chief communications officer, the two companies share ~140,000 customers. The lawsuit is an attempt to enforce what HP believes are contractual... Read more...
Oracle continues its push into the cloud computing market with an agreement to acquire RightNow Technologies for $1.5 billion ($43 per share). RightNow offers a slew of customer service tools designed to make interactions between its clients and their customers “rewarding and beneficial”, to quote the RightNow website. The company’s products and services will give Oracle plenty of instant new customers, as well as a ready-to-go service to battle Oracle’s cloud competitors in that particular space. In a press release, Thomas Kurian, Executive Vice President, Oracle Development, said "Oracle is moving aggressively to offer customers a full range of Cloud Solutions including... Read more...
Oracle revealed on Tuesday plans for its next-generation mobile and embedded development platform, JavaME 7. JavaME is the mobile system upon which the most intelligent phones were based before there were today's crop of smartphones, and it still powers billions of devices. It is also the thing over which Oracle is suing Google, claiming that Google illegally copied parts of JavaME when creating Android. (We'll quickly note before getting back to JavaME 7 that it looks like Oracle had a point. Earlier this month evidence surfaced that an Android developer did copy nine lines of code from Java, according to a report by MobileMedia ) Once upon a time, JavaME was the greatest thing to hit mobile... Read more...
It’s been a busy day for Oracle; at its OpenWorld conference, the company announced new hardware including the Oracle Big Data Appliance, Sun ZFS Storage Appliances, and Oracle Exalytics Business Intelligence Machine. The Big Data Appliance is designed to handle--well, Big Data. Oracle describes the concept of Big Data thusly: “Weblogs, social media feeds, smart meters, sensors and other devices generate massive volumes of data (commonly defined as ‘Big Data’) that isn’t readily accessible in enterprise data warehouses and business intelligence applications today.” The appliance is designed to help customers gather and make sense of Big Data and works in conjunction... Read more...
Oracle is publicly demonstrating its new T4 processor today and is shipping beta test systems to selected partners. The new T4 chip is a major departure from previous designs. Sun's T1 processor, codenamed Niagara and introduced in 2005, rejected a conventional focus on single-thread performance in favor of an aggressively multi-threaded, multi-core approach. CPU clock speeds were purposefully kept low to minimize power consumption. The Niagara T1, introduced in 2005 The T1, which was introduced in 2005, ran at a maximum of 1.4GHz and offered a maximum of eight cores, with each core capable of handling four threads for a total of 32 threads. The T3, released last year, is clocked at up to 1.67GHz,... Read more...
According to Samsung, Apple's request to the EU for an injunction against the Galaxy Tab 10.1 caught it completely by surprise. If that's true, Motorola may be in for a shock as well. Buried within Apple's injunction request is a reference to a similar request related to Motorola's Xoom. Apple and Motorola are currently engaged in their own nasty patent lawsuit in the US, but the Cupertino company's decision to open a European front passed under the radar. As FOSS Patents points out, Apple's decision to delay filing its injunction request could work against the company. German lawyers, according to the site, generally recommend that preliminary injunction requests be filed within 30 days of determining... Read more...
District Court judges are no strangers to outlandish demands or absurd claims, but Google and Oracle have jointly managed to push their case past Ludicrous Speed and into Plaid ("They've gone into plaid!"). In a hearing late last week, District Court Judge William Alsup informed both sides that they are "both asking for the moon and should be more reasonable." The judge questioned Oracle's estimate that Google had caused between $1.6-$6.1B in damages, particularly considering the fact that the lawyer who came up with that figure had been paid $700 an hour by Oracle to do so. At the same time, he scoffed at Google's claims that the money it's made through advertising on Android devices has... Read more...
The International Trade Commission (ITC) of the United States issued a ruling today that HTC's Android devices infringe of two of ten Apple patents. The ruling could cause major problems for HTC, given that Apple has asked the court for an injunction prohibiting the phone manufacturer from shipping any Android devices to US shores. HTC's counsel, Grace Lei, sought to downplay the decision in a recent statement. "Apple filed suit on 10 of its patents against HTC, but based on the judge's initial decision today only prevailed on 2 of those patents. HTC will vigorously fight these two remaining patents through an appeal before the ITC Commissioners who make the final decision," Lei said. The patents... Read more...
Android's rise to dominance as a smartphone/tablet OS has reshaped the mobile OS market--but recent actions by both Microsoft and Oracle could damage the operating system's appeal. Oracle and Google are locked in an ongoing lawsuit over Android's alleged infringement on certain Java-related patents, while both Oracle and Microsoft are negotiating licensing agreements with Android device manufacturers. While this is an ongoing situation, pressure has mounted in recent weeks.  Last week, news broke that Microsoft has demanded Samsung pay it $15 per Android device. The deal is similar to one the software giant reached with HTC last year; that handset manufacturer pays Microsoft $5 per Android... Read more...
Today, Microsoft released its detailed security report covering the latter half of 2010. Industry tends in general are positive—vulnerability disclosures in 2010 fell 16.5 percent from their 2009 levels and approximately 35 percent from 2006. Microsoft's own share of the vulnerability pie rose from 4.5 percent in 2009 to 7.2 percent in 2010; the company claims this is largely because industry disclosures fell so sharply in just one year. The general decline in disclosures hides sharp changes in the nature of the exploits roaming the Internet. From the report: Malware written in Java has existed for many years, but attackers had not focused significant attention on Java vulnerabilities until... Read more...
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