Items tagged with Oracle

No information is safe in the Internet age. Citycomp, an Germany-based IT services company, reported that they had been hacked and blackmailed. Some of their clients include Oracle, Airbus, Toshiba, Volkswagen, Leica, and Porsche. Citycomp is an IT services company that provides items such as servers, storage, and other computer equipment to other major companies. It appears that the hackers targeted the German branches of these international companies. The list of victims includes both corporations with an international reach and strictly German companies. The hackers, who go by the alias "Boris-Bullet Dodger", have distributed some of the stolen files on a website. Some of the affected firms... Read more...
Facebook is not the only company whose user data policies have captured the attention of a government agency. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) is investigating claims that Google harvests private data from Android users. This investigation could potentially affect over 10 million Australian Android users. The ACCC is particularly concerned that digital platforms like Google and Facebook have tremendous influence on the advertising market. Oracle Australia, a branch of Oracle Corporation, recently met with members of the ACCC and claimed that Google harvests an average of a gigabyte of data a month from individual Android users. This data includes location information... Read more...
Oracle is not going down without a fight. The company is currently funding a nonprofit group to help blacken Google’s name following their legal battle over Java. Ken Glueck, Senior Vice President of Oracle, has admitted that Oracle is “absolutely a contributor” to this smear campaign. Oracle is currently aiding in the “Google Transparency Project” on the Campaign for Accountability website. The “Campaign for Accountability” was created this past Spring in Washington in order to promote initiatives such as LGBTQIA rights and clean water. Daniel Stevens, Deputy Director of the “Campaign for Accountability” has refused to name any of their other donors. Microsoft has stated that they are not a... Read more...
MICROS, one of the largest point-of-sale payment systems in the world, has been hacked by a Russian organized cybercrime group with a history of hacking into banks and retailers. The full extent of the security breach is still being evaluated, but given the size and scope of MICROS, this could turn out to be another lucrative payday for the Russian cyber thieves.Oracle purchased MICROS in 2014. At the time, Oracle said its point-of-sale systems were being used at more than 330,000 cash registers around the world, including more than 200,000 in the food and beverage industry, over 100,000 deployed at retail sites, and more than 30,000 in place at hotels. In short, if you've been out to eat, shop,... Read more...
In what can be considered another legal setback for Oracle, a jury has ordered the firm to pay Hewlett-Packard Enterprise (HPE) $3 billion in damages for its decision to stop developing database software for HP's Itanium-based servers in 2011. Oracle plans to appeal the verdict, but for now it's on the hook for a significant sum over a contract dispute. What this all boils down to is whether or not Oracle had a legal obligation to continue supporting Itanium after Intel indicated that its end of life was near as it began focusing more on its x86 microprocessors. Oracle feels strongly that it had no such commitment, while HP successfully argued the opposite, adding that its servers would be obsolete... Read more...
Google has beaten Oracle in what became a protracted legal battle over the use of the latter's Java APIs in the former's Android mobile operating system. Oracle had sought $9.3 billion in damages, but any hopes of winning a big payday from Google were mostly dashed on Thursday when a U.S. jury unanimously sided with Google in the dispute. Oracle took issue with Google injecting certain parts of its Java platform into Android, the world's leading mobile OS (by market share), without a license agreement. The dispute led to a lawsuit being filed in 2010 that stated "in at least several instances, Android computer program code was also directly copied from copyrighted Oracle America code." Two years... Read more...
Oracle is hoping to score a major damages award from Google in court. Specifically, Oracle wants Google to fork over $9.3 billion, the amount Oracle claims Google now owes it for injecting certain parts of its Java platform into Android, the world's leading mobile operating system (by market share), without a license agreement.The dispute between Oracle and Google is one that's been going on for over a half a decade. Oracle initially sued Google in 2010, stating at the time that "in at least several instances, Android computer program code also was directly copied from copyrighted Oracle America code." It took two years for that case to go to trial, and when it finally did in 2012, a jury ruled... Read more...
It now looks as though we can chalk up yet another win for computer users around the globe, as Oracle has announced that it is “moving to a plugin-free web” from this point forward. And thankfully, that means that demise of the hated Java browser plugin. Like Adobe Flash, the Java plugin has long been a dangerous security risk for Windows and Mac computers, with hackers taking advantage of poor coding to deliver malicious payloads. Oracle has finally seen the writing on the wall, stating in a blog post that it will “deprecate the Java browser plugin in JDK 9.” Oracle goes on to explain that the plugin “will be removed from the Oracle JDK and JRE in a future Java SE release.”(Image Source: Rob... Read more...
If you don't pay close attention, you may end up switching your default search engine without realizing it. That's the whole idea, really. During Yahoo's annual shareholder meeting on Wednesday, company boss Marissa Mayer talked about how search was in Yahoo's DNA and always will be. More importantly, she announced a three-year partnership with Oracle aimed at getting more users to try Yahoo's search engine. As part of the partnership, Yahoo will be the default search provider for Oracle's Java software. What this means is when you install or update Java, the software will ask permission to change your browser's default search engine and homepage to Yahoo. The option to change both will be selected... Read more...
You would think that companies would have learned their lesson after the Superfish debacle, but I guess it should be no surprise that money talks. Windows users that install Java on their machines have attempted to dodge the installation of the Ask.com toolbar for years. Oracle bundles the adware with its Java package and counts on unsuspecting or simply inattentive users to allow the installation of the Ask.com toolbar. Mac users that chose to install Java were immune to such trickery; that it is until now. Unfortunately, Oracle has doubled down on its Ask.com “deliveries” by adding the adware to the Java 8 Update 40 installer for Macs. ZDNet’s Ed Bott reports that as with Windows installations... Read more...
IT admins would do well to prepare themselves for a rather large collection of security updates that Oracle is planning to release this Thursday. The updates are supposed to fix precisely 113 security vulnerabilities that a apply to hundreds of versions of the company's products, including Database, Fusion Middleware, Solaris, MySQL Server, and many more. "A Critical Patch Update is a collection of patches for multiple security vulnerabilities. This Critical Patch Update contains 113 new security vulnerability fixes across hundreds of Oracle products," Oracle explain in a blog post. "Some of the vulnerabilities addressed in this Critical Patch Update affect multiple products. Due to the threat... Read more...
Oracle sued Google over its use of Java to build the Android operating system a few years ago, but Google won the case. However, an appeals court has overturned that ruling, finding that “the declaring code and the structure, sequence, and organization of the API packages are entitled to copyright protection”. This ruling is a big deal because it could severely limit what software makers can safely do without getting sued and could hamper innovation. Google is of course displeased with the ruling, but others in the industry are none too happy either. Image credit: orangesparrow/Flickr Bryan Cantrill, CTO of Joyent, told Wired that the notion that you can copyright APIs is a perverted... Read more...
Though the hardware market has been contending with declining sales -- at least in terms of traditional PCs -- software is another story altogether. According to latest data released by market research firm Gartner, the worldwide software market grew 4.8 percent to $407.3 billion 2013, compared with $388.5 billion in 2012.d Microsoft is by far the biggest benefactor of a thriving software market in which it gobbles up nearly two-thirds, or 65.7 percent, of total dollars spent. That's up from 62 percent a year prior, putting the company in an even more comfortable lead for the top spot. Oracle now sits underneath Microsoft and collects 29.6 percent of the revenue spent on software, up from 28.7... Read more...
The launch a month ago of the Healthcare.gov website, the online portal for President Obama’s Affordable Care Act (AFA), aka Obamacare, went as badly as it possibly could have gone. Millions attempted to use the site, and it simply didn’t work. To fix the problems, the Obama administration is reaching out to the heaviest of hitters in the industry, including employees from Google, Red Hat, and Oracle. This, in addition to the work that Verizon will be doing to help clean up the disaster. Specifically, Google site reliability engineer Michael Dickerson and Presidential Innovation Fellow Greg Gershman will be on the case. Dickerson will work with QSSI, the company that built the information-collecting... Read more...
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