Items tagged with Open

One or the other of the two high-definition formats has to get an edge eventually, doesn't it?  This might help Blu-ray. Panasonic has started shipping samples of the world's thinnest internal Blu-ray drive -- just 9.5 mm high.Now available to PC manufacturers, the new sample 9.5 mm high BD drives, were accomplished by combining Panasonic's own technologies such as the low-profile, 2-lens actuator and spherical aberration compensation mechanism and an optimized optical design for CD, DVD and Blu-ray disc laser.Even with its 9.5 mm high thin profile, the new Panasonic BD drive features double speed reading and writing for both write-once BD-R and rewritable BD-RE discs. The product is also... Read more...
What would year-end magazine issues be without wild-eyed predictions for the future?  The Economist has wisely decided to limit their predictions to just next year, and to only three guesses. And unlike the usual flying car daydreams or SARS  epidemic nightmares, these seem pretty likely: Surfing will slow. Surfing will go wireless. Open source will begin to push out proprietary code, from the bottom up. Linux freaks will rejoice!And because it is free, Linux become the operating system of choice for low-end PCs. It started with Nicholas Negroponte, the brains behind the One Laptop Per Child project that aims to deliver computerised education to children in the developing world. His... Read more...
My mistake. That's Open Source. In a bid to get the European Union off their back after their stunning defeat in the EU's anti-trust trial, Microsoft has now licensed some of its proprietary code to the company that developed "Samba," software that allows operating systems other than Windows to communicate with a Windows client.So basically what Samba does is to provide interoperability between closed-source servers (Windows) and open-source ones. Samba debuted back in 1992 and since then it has grown into a popular, community-supported alternative to other SMB/CIFS implementations.However, interoperability with Windows servers was often hindered by Microsoft’s protocol formats modifications... Read more...
Run, don't walk, to your nearest PC to sign up.   Only the first 15,000 registrants will get in, according to Ulteo, developers of the online version.The beta which is open to the first 15,000 subscribers, offers access to the complete OpenOffice suite without any prior installation, and 1GB of free storage.The suite also adds collaboration capabilities, allowing multiple users to work on a shared document, with the changes tracked in real time.Ulteo clearly has high hopes for the software, citing the potential uses in schools and colleges. The company also claims that taking OpenOffice online could help broaden adoption of the open-source office package.There are apparently still openings... Read more...
While you're waiting for your Crysis downloads to finish (Don't be fooled, it's just a pre-load and store.  You have to wait until 11/16 for the ability to activate), you might want to check out the new Lightsmark OpenGL demo.  It's even got real-time global illumination and real-time Penumbra shadows... and stuff.    "Natural lighting makes artificial graphics life-like. Computers get faster, but rendering more polygons doesn't add value if lighting looks faked, so insiders know that the next big thing is proper lighting aka Realtime Global Illumination. Typical workloads in realtime rendering will shift. Lightsmark simulates it. Global Illumination renders often take hours.... Read more...
British Telecom and Fon, a Spanish tech firm backed by Google, are attempting to persuade British households to open up their Wi-Fi connections so that others can use them.The question is: why?The answer is actually not as surprising as the one we were hoping for:“They are hoping it will push wireless broadband access, or wi-fi, into suburban and even rural areas. In return for letting other BT customers use part of their broadband connection, anyone signing up to "BT Fon" will have free access to the networks of other British "Foneros" and more than 190,000 Fon-enabled wireless access hotspots across 50 countries including the US, Japan and France."The UK will become the country with the most... Read more...
As of today, Microsoft is taking pre-registrations for "Office Live Workspace," their answer to Google Docs. Only a limited number of pre-registrants will be allowed into the first group.The software maker is announcing Office Live Workspace, a free online tool for viewing, sharing and storing--but not editing--Office documents online. (Its existing Office Live efforts will be rebranded as Office Live Small Business.) It's not quite ready--starting Monday customers will be able to put in their name to be part of a beta testing program expected to begin later this year.The biggest difference between Google Docs and this service is the lack of an ability to use the browser to edit any documents. ... Read more...
Software unlocking of the iPhone has been a source of threats from AT&T.  However, there is an exemption in the DMCA that allows software unlocking of phones - the question has been what will happen if that's tested against a commercial product.  In this case, an open source, free product, there's no recourse, except for a ROM change that stops this, of course.The first, non-GUI version was released last night; a beta GUI version has been released. If you want to try the manual version, that’s linked at the same site. Kudos to the iPhone Dev Team and all involved on this. This was (and still is) a lot of work.How soon will the 1.03 version of iPhone software be released, hmm?... Read more...
AMD Works with Novell to Accelerate Open Source Linux Driver Initiative Targeting Developers for ATI Radeon™ X1000 Series and ATI Radeon™ HD 2000 Series Graphics Processors Sunnyvale, Calif -- September 7, 2007 --AMD (NYSE: AMD) today announced a major strategic initiative to support the Open Source development community for ATI Radeon™ graphics processors. The week of September 10th, AMD plans to provide an open source information and development package supporting the ATI Radeon™ HD 2000 series as well as ATI Radeon™ X1000 series of graphics processing units (GPU) on Linux desktops. To accelerate... Read more...
In the spring Amazon.com said it would unveil a digital music store by year's-end. It looks like they are going to beat their timeline. Sources indicate that Amazon.com will launch an MP3-based music service in mid-September. However, it's also indicated that the date is somewhat fluid, as it has been pushed back several times already (shades of Microsoft and Windows Vista!). The online retail giant has tentatively set a mid-September target for the launch of its long-anticipated music service, sources familiar with the situation said. The store will offer songs in the iPod-friendly MP3 format and give consumers who use the popular music player an alternative source for major label... Read more...
Electronics giant Sony  announced a new version of its Walkman today. But instead of Pet Shop Boys and Flock of Seagulls cassette mix tapes, this one plays digital media, including video. And Sony was sure to point out that the devices aren't tied to any particular media format, unlike *cough* Apple *cough* players. And to sort of drive the point home, Sony also announced they were ending their proprietary ATRAC audio format in North America and Europe. Why, it's like open platform heaven over there at Sony these days.  The Japanese company, one of the world's biggest electronics makers, said its NWZ-A810 and NWZ-S610 series of Walkman digital music players would be available in... Read more...
CableLabs, Intel to Bring OpenCable Platform to Future Intel Consumer Electronics Products Member Companies Collaborate to Deliver Innovative Set-Top Boxes for Interactive Services SANTA CLARA, Calif. and LOUISVILLE, Colo., June 25, 2007 — Intel Corporation and CableLabs, the technology consortium of cable operators, announced today that the two companies have signed an OpenCable* Platform Agreement and will include support for the OpenCable Platform in future Intel consumer electronic (CE) system-on-a-chip (SoC) products. Incorporating support for OpenCable allows digital televisions, set-top boxes, digital media... Read more...
Google CEO Eric Schmidt recently gave a speech about the future of Google to a crowd of surfers and texters.  The talk covered several topics from dealing with governments such as China to the future of Google.  Here's a snippet:   "Just weeks after Google announced iGoogle, a new name for its personalized home page with gadgets that tell Google about users for individualized service, Schmidt indicated Google would become much more personal in the future."You can imagine in 10 years, Google will say, "Good morning Eric! You're late already, but, Eric, you're always late."Friedman said the Internet makes it difficult for politicians to escape their mistakes, and few... Read more...
In a lengthy interview in Fortune magazine, Microsoft general counsel Brad Smith outlined Microsoft's contention that they can prove 235 patent violations by open source software. And they'd like to be paid royalties, please.  Smith broke down the alleged patent violations during the Fortune interview, saying the Linux kernel violates 42 patents and the operating system's user interface violates a further 65. He went on to claim that the Open Office application suite violates 45 patents and open-source e-mail applications infringe on 15 more. Other open-source software applications infringe on 68 patents, Smith said. The short answer here is Microsoft owns a lot of patents now,... Read more...
Last month, nearly 10% of the Class of 2008 at Duke University's business school were caught cheating on a take-home final exam. But is it really cheating to collaborate on projects anymore? How dumb would you have to be to work that way in the real world? Still, many believe that a rethinking of the assessment process is in store. The Stanford University Design School, for example, is so collaborative that "it would be impossible to cheat," says D-school professor Robert I. Sutton. "If you found somebody to help you write an exam, in our view that's a sign of an inventive person who gets stuff done. If you found someone to do work for free who was committed to open source, we'd say,... Read more...
McAfee's semi-annual overview of their on-going security research says that cyber-criminals are becoming more sophisticated, and are banding together in loose associations to swap code and deliver support for their nefarious endeavors. They've got their eye on your smartphone, too. Among the specific trends outlined in the report are expectations for the continued growth of botnets with the cooperation among hackers adding to the problem via group efforts to develop and refine threat code in the same manner that open-source contributors work in a community. The vast majority of botnets will continue to target flaws in Microsoft products and propagate themselves through buffer overflows,... Read more...
In order to combat crime in a world dominated by technology, the Secret Service has announced the opening of the National Computer Forensic Institute. The institute, to be built in Hoover, Alabama, is scheduled to open in 2008. The plan is to turn out about 900 computer forensic law enforcement officers each year. High-tech training is increasingly important for police officers, detectives, and federal agents as crime continues its migration onto the electronic byways of the Internet. Unfortunately, the level of training offered to law enforcement is "diverse," as the Secret Service delicately puts it. To better educate US crime fighters, the Service has announced the creation of the National... Read more...
In reaction to the rising number of Chinese youth addicted to the internet, many new centers have opened to help treat these addiction such as The Internet Addiction Treatment Center in China's Daxing county. Half boot-camp and half rehab center, the center uses military discipline coupled with therapy to help treat teens and their addictive cyber-surfing ways. Rehabilitation centers are not the only step China is taking to stop internet addiction, the Chinese government is also cracking down on violent video games as well as restricting the opening of new internet cafes. Combining sympathy with discipline, a military-style boot camp near Beijing is at the front-line of China's... Read more...
NVIDIA's CEO, Jen-Hsun Huang presided over the NASDAQ opening bell this morning to commemorate the company's 8th year on the NASDAQ stock market. "Jen-Hsun Huang, Chief Executive Officer of NVIDIA Corporation, presides over the NASDAQ opening bell. This event coincides with the Company's eight year listing anniversary on the NASDAQ stock market. NVIDIA Quadro FX professional graphics solutions are driving the graphics for the NASDAQ MarketSite Tower and Video Wall. Commanding attention in New York City's Times Square, the NASDAQ MarketSite Tower is the largest stationary video screen in the world."... Read more...
According to a report at CNET, Intel is in the process of launching a new fabrication facility in China. The new facility will focus on producing multi-core processors at the 65nm level. Inside sources were unable to give exact details on date and costs of the facility, but considering previous facility projects, the new plant is estimated to cost Intel roughly $2.5 billion to $3.5 billion USD. Just several years ago, a full plant would cost Intel nearly $5 billion. Intel already has an established presence throughout China, making the new 65nm plant its third major operation in the country. Shanghai and Chengdu are two locations where Intel branches staff roughly 6,000 employees. CNET's... Read more...
AMD Announces Development of DTX Open Standard to Help Enable Broad Adoption of Small Form Factor PCs SUNNYVALE, Calif. - Jan. 10, 2007 - AMD (NYSE: AMD) today announced development of DTX, an open standard specification designed by AMD to enable the broad adoption of small form factor PCs. The DTX standard will be designed to empower OEMs, ODMs, and component vendors to deliver innovative solutions to market that are smaller, quieter, and desktop-friendly, while leveraging commonalities within the ecosystem that benefit both customers and end users. The DTX standard will take advantage of the existing ATX infrastructure and benefits, including cost efficiency, system options and backward-compatibility,... Read more...
Early in 2004 IBM challenged Sun to co-develop an open-source implementation of Java. Sun did not immediately warm to the idea. Though IBM has its own implementation of Java and could easily have open-sourced it, IBM believed that any open source version of Java should have Sun involved. At the same time Eric Raymond, president of the Open Source Initiative and one of open source's fathers, backed IBM and called on Sun to contribute Java to the open source community. In Raymond's opinion, the "'Sun Community Source License' promoted proprietary lock-in. He also contended that most open-source developers simply would not want any part of that. Through continued support... Read more...
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