Items tagged with Nielsen

Not only is Netflix cheaper than a cable TV subscription, the value proposition is higher—much higher, in fact, which some might find surprising (and even outright dispute) due to Netflix's limited catalog of titles. Be that as it may, Netflix subscribers pay roughly three times less per hour of content than cable TV subscribers.That's one possible takeaway from a comprehensive report by Nielsen (PDF) that examines content consumption across television, radio, TV-connected devices, PCs, smartphones, and tablets. Nielsen didn't set out to compare Netflix to cable TV directly, but using the numbers provided, the folks at AllFlicks did some interesting math to figure out how much Netflix costs per... Read more...
Prior to the Internet, we all watched our favorite TV shows and movies on these big, bulky television sets with curved glass and just a handful of channels to flip through, even on cable. Television viewing has evolved over time, and now that so many people live connected lifestyles, it would be silly to ignore mobile viewing habits when analyzing TV ratings. Nielsen realizes this and so for the past several months, the information and measurement company has been sharing with client and industry leaders how to incorporate audiences viewing TV content on digital devices into traditional TV measurement for the 2014-15 TV season. Taking it a big step further, Nielsen said it plans to make a Software... Read more...
When fun, interesting, or mindblowing (or unfortunately, often mind-numbing) things happen on TV, the chatter about it ramps up on Facebook and Twitter. Names, TV shows, and topics trend, and those analytics help media companies gauge engagement. The old Nielsen ratings system is what it is, but instantaneous, global social networking data--now that’s something else entirely. In the head-to-head competition between Facebook and Twitter, Facebook is looking to get a step on its rival with the big four TV networks by giving them data reports about how many actions a given TV episode has generated on the social network. Thus, all of those likes, comments, and shares will be part of a mountain... Read more...
Twitter has become a force all its own, and a recent partnership with Nielsen is proof that the social network has mainstream reach, too. Now, a Nielsen research report is suggesting that tweet count does indeed have a link to TV ratings. A new independent study by Nielsen provides, for the first time, statistical evidence of a two-way causal influence between broadcast TV tune-in for a program and the Twitter conversation around that program. The study used time series analysis to determine if Twitter activity drives increased tune-in rates for broadcast TV and if broadcast TV tune-in leads to increased Twitter activity. By analyzing minute-to-minute trends in Nielsen’s live TV ratings... Read more...
Many consumers have figured out they can save a bundle by cutting out cable/satellite service in favor of streaming media. Hulu Plus, for example, runs $8 per month and gives you access to many of the same TV shows that appear on cable TV networks, including extended director's cuts of sitcoms like Parks and Recreation. Toss in another $8 for Netflix, and now you have access to a wealth of TV shows and movies for $16 per month, all on-demand and with less commercials than regular TV. It makes sense for a lot of people, so why isn't Nielson counting those viewers? That's a good question, one that even Nielsen couldn't answer, so the company has decided to get with the times and start tallying... Read more...
Wondering if smartphones are just another fad, like 3D? Wonder no more. Nielsen's latest research shows that nearly two-thirds of new mobile buyers are selecting smartphones over "dumbed" alternatives, despite lofty data prices and those nasty tiers. During Q2 2012 smartphone penetration continued to grow, with nearly 55% of U.S. mobile buyers owning smartphones as of June 2012. The growth here is unmistakable: it's coming from those selecting smartphones. As for the OS split? Android's still leading the pack in the U.S., with 51.8% of those studied using Google's mobile operating system. Next was iOS (iPhone), with 34.3%. RIM's troubles are seen quite clearly with the 8.1% share of BlackBerry... Read more...
It may seem like everyone owns a smartphone these days, and that's because over half of all mobile subscribers living in the U.S. -- or 50.4 percent, to be exact -- do own one, according to the latest data from market research firm Nielsen. That figure is up 2.6 percentage points since December 2011 back when feature phones were still the most popular option.  Not anymore. According to Nielsen, Apple is the top manufacturer of smartphone handsets, but iOS isn't the most popular mobile operating system in town. That honor belongs to Android, which is installed on 48.5 percent of all smartphones, compared to 32 percent for iOS. Sitting in a distant third place is RIM Blackberry (11.6 percent),... Read more...
If you grew up playing on an Atari 2600 or ColecoVision, your parents may have shrugged off your obsession with videogames as nothing more than a fad. They couldn't have been more wrong. Videogames are more popular than ever, as evidenced by more than half -- 56 percent, to be exact -- of U.S. households laying claim to at least one modern generation game console, according market research firm Nielsen. Not surprisingly, nearly two-thirds of consoles are located in the living room, which underscores that these devices are not just adept at playing games, but also serve double duty as media centers. What some might find surprising, however, is that the Nintendo Wii leads the way in the living... Read more...
Don't worry Android smartphone fans, now that your platform of choice is on top (in terms of market share), it's probably going to stay there for awhile. The latest data from market research firm Nielsen bear this out, pegging 46.3 percent of all smartphone owners choosing Android in the fourth quarter of 2011. At the same time, it was the iPhone 4S that proved to be the uber popular device last quarter. "The high-profile launch of Apple’s iPhone 4S in the Fall had an enormous impact on the proportion of smartphone owners who chose an Apple iPhone," Nielsen said in a blog post. "Among recent acquirers, meaning those who said they got a new device within the past three months, 44.5 percent... Read more...
We all have our favorite smartphone apps, a go-to collection that we use more often than any others, and for Android users 18 years and older living in the U.S., they consist of Facebook and apps from Google like Gmail and the Android Market, according to data released by market research firm Nielsen. In fact, Google's Android Market ranked as the most popular app in all three age categories (18-24, 25-34, and 35-44), a good sign that means the masses aren't out there plucking apps from unreliable and potentially dangerous sources. If we discount the Android Market, which is the default vehicle of choice for installing apps in the first place, Facebook ranks next as the most popular app in all... Read more...
Wondering what to get your little ones for Christmas (or Hanukkah or Kwanzaa, or just because)? Well then, pay no attention to market research firm Nielsen if you're currently torn between a skateboard or a bicycle. Either of those will get your kids out of the house and moving around, which is a good thing for this generation. But if you're looking to score hipster parent points by getting them something they actually want, then stop being foolish and start turning your attention to electronic gadgets. This iHoliday, as Nielsen now calls it, is dominated by Apple devices on nearly every kid's wish list. Of those ages 6-12 years told, 44 percent want an iPad. Too rich for your blood? You could... Read more...
According to the most recent data from market research guru Nielsen, Google's mighty Android platform stands tallest in the U.S. smartphone space with a majority 39 percent share. That leaves Apple in an almost distant second place with 28 percent, and RIM clinging to relevance with a 20 percent stake. Credit Android's success to Google's decision to make its open source operating system available to all handset manufacturers, as opposed to Apple, which is the sole maker of the iPhone. As such, Apple ranks as the top smartphone maker in the United States. Image Credit: Android Wallpapers Second to Apple is HTC, whose Android smartphones comprise 14 percent of the market, according to Nielsen.... Read more...
New sales data from the RIAA indicate that record sales are up 1 percent for the first half of 2011 as compared to 2010. Total album sales in the first half of 2011 totaled 155.5 million, up from 153.9 million in 2010. A one percent gain might seem meaningless in any other industry, but we're talking about music sales, which have been declining every single year since 2004. There is, of course, a great deal of change going on underneath that single macro percentage point. Music consumption patterns have shifted dramatically in the past seven years. CD sales continue to decline, but a portion of that decrease has been offset by growth in digital track downloads, digital album sales, and various... Read more...
Whoa, whoa, whoa, hold the boat a minute, young fella. We like to fancy ourselves an intelligent bunch, but something just isn't adding up. According to market research firm The Nielsen Company, music sales in the U.S. are up 1.6 percent in 2011. The reason, Nielsen says, has a lot to do with the explosive growth of digital album and track sales. How can that be if, as the RIAA would have us believe, starving artists are out in the streets begging for handouts as piracy kills the music business? We're embellishing a bit here, sure, but the point we're making is that the RIAA's fear mongering needs to stop. Let's look at some more stats. According to Nielsen, digital album and track purchases... Read more...
Think back to when you were 6 years old waking up on Christmas morning. If you were lucky, your big ticket item was a BMX bike. Race car sets, Matchbox cars, and a new Michael Jackson album were all winning bets too. These days? Kids ages 6-12 want nothing more than to find an iPad sitting under the tree on December 25th. According to market research firm Nielsen, Apple's magical tablet topped the list of electronic devices kids in the above age category are pining for, with 31 percent hoping to score an iPad, lack of Flash support be damned. A computer and iPod touch tied for second place, each one claiming a 29 percent interest in a future purchase, followed by a Nintendo DS/DSi/DS Lite (25... Read more...
According to a recent wireless study by the Nielsen Co., the typical smartphone user consumes less than 300MB of data each month. This figure represents an increase of about 230 percent compared to last year's figure. Considering the increasing popularity of data-intensive mobile services such as video chat and Hulu streaming services, we have to expect that mobile data use will continue to rise. The Nielsen Co. sorted through about 60,000 mobile bills to discover that the average smartphone user was consuming about 298MB of data each month. As you may recall, AT&T recently unveiled new, tiered data plans. The lowest tier offers only 200MB of data for $15 per month. Although this allotment... Read more...
The long-discussed Comcast online television experiment will launch before year's end, allowing viewers to — legally — watch certain shows online for the first time. A couple dozen networks - including HBO, Showtime, TNT and AMC - have agreed to allow Comcast to provide access to their most popular television shows online to existing cable company subscribers. Time Warner is said to be next in line, if the Comcast experiment works out, and it's possible the move will extend beyond subscribers once the kinks are worked out. It's up to the individual networks to decide how much of their content is available online. For example, HBO could release all seasons of "True Blood," while AMC might decide... Read more...
Since announcing the inception of TV Everywhere last month, Comcast has managed to line up a whopping 23 networks to agree to provide their content online.It started simply, with an agreement between the cable company and Time Warner (owner of TNT and TBS and, interestingly enough, a cable company as well) to provide shows online, on demand. Original programming was to be accessible on Comcast.net and Fancast.net to customers of the cable company. The idea was to later stream the shows on TNT.tv and TBS.com.Now? There are 23 networks who've signed up: A&E, AMC, BBC America, CBS, Cinemax, DIY Network, Fine Living Network, Food Network, Hallmark Channel, HBO, HGTV, History, IFC, MGM Impact,... Read more...
Fans of The Closer, My Boys and Tyler Perry just got another way to watch their favorite shows: Online.Time Warner Inc. and Comcast Corp. yesterday announced a partnership to "develop broad principles for the TV Everywhere model to guide the distribution of its television content online."The basis of TV Everywhere are these principles:Bring more TV content, more easily to more people across platforms. Video subscribers can watch programming from their favorite TV networks online for no additional charge. Video subscribers can access this content using any broadband connection. Programmers should make their best and highest-rated programming available online. Both networks and video distributors... Read more...
The day so many had hoped to put off forever is almost here: June 12. That's the day when all broadcast channels must transition to digital broadcasting and millions of viewers across the nation will end up without TV service. The horror!While most people — anyone with cable or satellite television, for example — won't be affected, there are an awful lot of people out there who rely on the free broadcast signal that floats through the airwaves for their television service. It's estimated that fully 2.8 million people who get the basic broadcast channels now simply using rabbit ears or an old-fashioned antenna on their roof will lose that signal come Friday. That's 2.5 percent of Americans with... Read more...