Items tagged with machine learning

Intel Xeon Phi Processor DieIt’s been nearly two years since we first heard about Intel’s next generation Xeon Phi “Knights Landing” processors, which are geared towards the High Performance Computing (HPC) segment. The processors are a big part of Intel’s Scalable System Framework (SSF) and are built on using general-purpose x86 architecture using open standards. Intel says that this offers customers greater flexibility with respect to programming languages and tools for software development — basically anything that can run on traditional Xeon processors is available to the Xeon Phi family. Today, Intel announced that its Xeon Phi processors are finally available to customers. This comes nearly... Read more...
The concept and implementation of artificial intelligence is nothing new, but with today's computer hardware at our perusal, AI advancement only continues to develop at a rapid pace. Siri and Cortana are both effective AI bots, able to understand a great number of your queries and spit back an answer immediately. As time goes on, AI is only going to become more prevalent, and more important. That's a thought that Dave Coplin, Microsoft UK's Chief Envisioning Officer, agrees with. At an AI conference held late last week, Coplin made the huge statement that AI is the most important technology anyone is working on today. It's something that's not just going to benefit the companies... Read more...
Microsoft has been at the forefront of the machine-learning craze, having developed demos that are both neat and useful. About a year ago, the company released a tool that took a guess at your age, and just this past fall, it created a tool to help identify your emotions. The company has even developed a solution that can give a computer a sense of humor. There's seemingly no limit to where machine-learning can take us. Not all in this machine-learning realm can be perfect, though. Just last month, Microsoft had to pull a Twitter bot it called "Tay" from the internet after people managed to manipulate its "thoughts" for the worse. In no time, Tay became racist and sex-crazed, and we're pretty... Read more...
If you're a fan of travel, you're probably going to love what Google has been up to lately. As we've covered many times, Google is no stranger to machine-learning and developing complex and powerful neural networks of computer resources. Now, the company has decided to focus on geography as well as testing you, not only its own neural network. Google's Tobias Weyand, with the help of other engineers, has developed a neutral network that helps pinpoint exactly where in the world a photograph was taken. For things like landmarks, this wouldn't be too complicated. But what about inside someone's home? Inside a shopping mall? On an ordinary road like the one below? The image above was pulled... Read more...
As we've talked about a number of times in the past, Google is very keen on taking good advantage of deep-learning to help accomplish some amazing things. Its latest venture could affect us in a very direct way: by making it easier to search for specific photos in our collection. Object identification is already a big part of Google's business; it's why the company's search engine is so eerily accurate at times. It knows the difference between "small" and "large", different types of very similar objects, colors, and so forth. With a partnership with Movidius, which is headquartered in San Mateo, California, Google will pack a special chip in some future smartphones that add acceleration to image... Read more...
We've talked a lot about "machine-learning" over the past couple of years, and it's for one good reason: small and large companies alike are taking it very seriously. Just a couple of weeks ago, we reported that Yahoo released a huge 13.5TB trove of data to be used for machine-learning, and at the same time, we recounted a couple of other good recent examples as well, such as Microsoft teaching computers to have a sense of humor and improved emotion detection. If you're new to the machine-learning world and don't completely understand what it actually is, the simplest description is "teaching computers to learn". While human brains are incredible devices, computers can offer the unique ability... Read more...
The digital landscape has evolved quite substantially over the past decade, primarily due to smart devices taking over our lives. Beyond that, "machine-learning" has also become a major force with many top-flight companies, with many of them seeing a lot of value (ultimately, revenue-wise) in churning through big data sets. It's even helping some companies collaborate with users at large. To give a couple of examples of what machine-learning can do, Microsoft released a neat project a couple of months ago that made use of machine-learning to detect your emotion; whether it be happiness, disgust, or anger. Microsoft even helped give computers a sense of humor, which is about as freaky as... Read more...
By now, it should be clear that machine-learning is turning into big business for the biggest corporations. We learned back in September that Apple is on a hiring spree to bring in some good talent, and Amazon even leases out the fruits of its efforts for researchers to take advantage of. Even more recently, we learned that Google loves and trusts its TensorFlow machine-learning library so much, it's willing to share it with the world by making it open source. Machine-learning can be used for a multitude of things, both serious and not-so-serious. Microsoft has shown us in the past some good examples of the not-so-serious side, including an age-detection platform it showed off back in May... Read more...
In the world of machine-learning, there are few companies putting as much effort into its progression than Google. We learned just a few weeks ago about one of Google's "signals" called RankBrain that helps handle our most outlandish search requests, and today, we learn of TensorFlow, an important learning library that Google wants to share with the world. In a new blog post, Google refreshes our memory about what wasn't possible just a couple of years ago. Trying to talk to your phone while on a busy sidewalk? Good luck. Translate a sign that's in a different language? Hah! In a very short amount of time, though, Google's machine- and deep-learning work has dramatically improved the situation... Read more...
As we wind down 2015, it's not hard to see some trends arise when looking back at the months leading us up to this point. Right from the get-go, an obvious trend with the biggest companies out there has been the adoption of machine-learning techniques. While machine-learning isn't new, it's now being treated as something of huge importance, and it's definitely going to be a big part of our future. Late last year, we learned that Microsoft had adopted NVIDIA graphics cards to help it accelerate its machine-learning capabilities, and this past May, the company released a neat age-guessing tool. While that's more for fun, machine-learning can be used for more important things as well, such as delivering... Read more...
It might sound like a buzzword that's come out of nowhere, but "machine-learning" is big business. It's a business of ultimate importance, even - one that Google, Amazon, even NVIDIA, and now Apple are trying to capitalize on and become better at than their competitors. In the past few months alone, we've seen Amazon release a machine-learning service which lets people tap into its expertise for a fee, Microsoft release an age-guessing tool, Google aim to improve spam filtering, and even some software that helps detect humor. It's clear that machine-learning will be an enormous part of our future, a reality that Apple seems to have caught onto a bit late. While its competitors have been beefing... Read more...
It might sound odd, but what if the only way to rapidly improve something was to kill off most of what we have? We're talking something so grim, I almost hate to write it: mass extinction. The idea is that if a large part of the population is purged, it'll inevitably speed up the evolutionary process of surviving persons. Fortunately, there are no planned tests of such a theory outside of a computer simulation, such as one some scientists at the University of Texas in Austin developed. Through much testing, Risto Miikkulainen and Joel Lehman discovered that when most of the learned information in a walking simulation was destroyed, the remaining AI began to evolve at a much quicker pace. As with... Read more...
Machine-learning can be used for a wide variety of things, but I admit one I never thought of was humor. No, not to tell jokes (though we've seen proof of how humorous that can be through Siri and Cortana), but instead churning through tons of jokes and deciphering which ones are the best, and ultimately, being able to single out unknown jokes as being worthy of being repeated. Of course, this all ties to a real-world example. For the past decade, The New Yorker has had a wordless cartoon at the back of its magazine, with readers being invited to send in their ideas for captions. Despite receiving thousands of entries each week, assistants at the magazine have been tasked with sorting through... Read more...
Computer learning has helped a multitude of different technologies become a reality, with one in particular being emotion-detection. Most examples I've seen in the past have been simple, though, such as being able to detect a smile or a frown - something that shouldn't be that challenging. But with today's super-fast computers, and even mobile devices, we're now able to detect emotion with far greater granularity. To see an example, we just have to turn to facial recognition expert Rana el Kaliouby. She gave a talk at TED last month to highlight just how accurate emotion-detection has become, and depending on your perspective, the result is either amazing, or downright scary. I highly encourage... Read more...
We may not have even hit the middle of 2015 yet, but it seems certain that one of the most-used tech buzzwords of the year is going to be "machine learning". While the idea behind getting computers to teach themselves is nothing new, the focus on it has been recently amplified. At March's GPU Technology Conference, NVIDIA spent a lot of time talking about machine learning, and since then, both Amazon and Microsoft have talked it up, as well. Now, it's Wolfram Alpha's turn. In a new blog post, company founder Stephen Wolfram touts a new feature that he's waited many decades for. It's called ImageIdentify, and it's designed to tell you exactly what you're looking at. Feed it a picture of a cheetah?... Read more...
Machine learning and artificial intelligence aren't easy things to grasp, but both are critically important for technology to march on, our surroundings to get smarter, and the digital assistants within our phones to become more useful. Microsoft Research and NVIDIA are teaming up this week to showcase what's possible when two giants in the space link hands and share insights. NVIDIA GPUs are being used by Microsoft Research, and the results are impressive. Microsoft Research employs around 1,000 scientists and engineers to make significant product contributions and address some of society’s toughest challenges. According to information released by both companies, an increasing amount of... Read more...
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